Those not-a-taxi ridesharing services are facing all sorts of difficulties, from union challenges to unfriendly local laws. Of course, they're also enjoyed by thousands of people around the world and have support from other union groups, so you're forgiven if you can't keep straight who's in favor of what on the issue. One thing is certain, though, France might soon be a completely anti-ridesharing country.

French legislators are discussing a law that would really hinder the work that Uber and other app-based ridesharing companies (like French companies Snapcar and Chauffeur-Privé) are doing. Namely, between fares, Uber drivers would need to go back to their headquarters or to a parking garage. No waiting in the park. No driving around aimlessly. Nothing. Just go home and wait for another fare. The only way out of the "go home" rule is if the driver has another reservation lined up. The problem is that Uber would not be allowed to show where its cars are on an online map. So, yeah.

The underlying issue, according to The Wall Street Journal, is that the government only allows taxis to respond to street hails. Uber gets around this by using the app-based reservation system, but if you can see that there's an Uber car around the block, what's the real difference between that and a street hail, is the government's point.

In January, the government tried to force ridesharing drivers to have to wait 15 minutes between fares, but that decree was suspended after protests. The new "go home" law passed the French Senate last week and will now be voted on by the National Assembly in the fall. We expect more protests before then.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      Greg
      • 2 Days Ago
      This is a case of the govt should define the rules of the game--requiring a certain level of safety & performance (vehicle condition, driver training/certification, amenities/capacity, fairness of billing/handling disputes, etc.)--and then let people do their thing. I hate to see new ideas be squashed because the govt plays protectionist to existing systems. And who is to say that a parking garage or other convenient location is *not* a headquarters or similar "home" location? If "going home" is the same thing as going to pick up the next fare, the law could certainly backfire.
      Tysto
      • 2 Days Ago
      I favor unions, but France's anti-innovation labor movement will get them the backward culture they deserve. Uber is far and away better than the taxi industry, which hasn't changed much since the 1950s. If taxi drivers want to complain that Uber doesn't pay outrageous licensing fees like they do, then they should be protesting the licensing fees, not Uber. Vive la competition!
      Liz Miller
      • 2 Days Ago
      Go to http://www.lyftvsuber.com/ to try out Uber or Lyft for yourself! The website compares the two most popular ride-sharing services. $30, $25 of FREE ride credit for new passengers and up to $500 sign-up BONUS for new drivers!! Drivers can make as much as $40/hr! Hope you can see what all the hype is about :) Thanks!!
      Levine Levine
      • 2 Days Ago
      Since the day Marie Antoinette met Monsieur Guillotine, France became socialist. It should come not as a surprise the socialist Vichy government sided with the National Socialist German Worker's Party, commonly called the Nazi Party, during WWII. The Nazi rewarded the Vichy government with the governance of France during the German occupation. France's socialist economic policies have priced nearly all French products out of the world market --even French wine. On any given day there's a labor strike or dispute in France. French workers, especially government workers, are the most spoiled brats. Over priced and underwhelm quality French auto makers Renault got its butt first kicked out of USA in the early 70s. Peugeot and Citroen quickly followed. French militant labor unions ensured no French made auto will be competitive and re-emerge in the USA. In France Liberte' means the freedom to bribe politicians to impede your competitors; Fraternite' means labor unions run the country; Egalite' means every Frenchmen have equal access to government freebies.
        • 2 Days Ago
        @Levine Levine
        Dear Mr Levine I'm tired of people like you that spread this kind of "clichés" and abusive generalizations about foreign countries. Please update your knowledge before talking, instead of insulting people. This story is all about the taxi lobby that conduct a "war" against ridesharing companies, nothing to do with "socialism". By the way, the senate amended (not sure about the word, I'm not a native english speaker) that controversial "go home" law, that most people here in france regard as stupid. As the article say, let's wait until the law voted on by the National Assembly in the fall. Last thing, I'm a happy customer of those ridesharing companies. Thank you.
      Liz Miller
      • 2 Days Ago
      Go to http://www.lyftvsuber.com/ to try out Uber or Lyft for yourself! The website compares the two most popular ride-sharing services. $30, $25 of FREE ride credit for new passengers and up to $500 sign-up BONUS for new drivers!! Drivers can make as much as $40/hr! Hope you can see what all the hype is about :) Thanks!!
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 2 Days Ago
        @Liz Miller
        Sorry Liz, but that 40 dollar per hour is pure bull. Ride share is great but let's not lie about how much drivers make. I know how much they make and you are lying.