If you've been sniffing around the PlayStation Vita debating whether to pull the trigger, Scion has an offer for you: buy an iQ and you'll get the Vita free. This isn't the first tie-up with the little car and the little console: the iQ was one of the available vehicles in the MotorStorm RC game.

The offer is good only until June 31, 2012, so you've got some time to think about it. Sure, this will add (just) $15,700 to the price of your portable gaming station... but at least you'll have some way to carry it. And when you're finished making that deal, can we interest you in a Mercedes for the low low price of $1 million? But first, scroll down for a read of the Scion press release with details.
Show full PR text
Scion Announces Collaboration with its iQ and Sony's PlayStation®Vita

TORRANCE, Calif., May 1, 2012 – Scion is pleased to announce that starting May 1 through July 31, 2012, buyers of a new 2012 Scion iQ will receive a PlayStation®Vita (PS Vita), portable entertainment system, while supplies last. The promotion coincides with the nationwide release of the iQ, Scion's fourth vehicle and the world's smallest four-seater. For full details, please visit www.scion.com/psvita.

"Scion is very proud of the iQ's intelligent and functional design," said Jack Hollis, Scion Vice President. "Similar to the PS Vita, the Scion iQ comes loaded with premium technological features, has a focus on functionality, is concentrated into a suitably small package and most importantly is tons of fun."

Scion is excited to give iQ owners an entertaining way to enjoy the world's smallest four-seater, even when they are not in the driver's seat. Originally released March 7th as a limited-time free download to PS Vita owners, MotorStorm RC included the Scion iQ as an in-game vehicle option. The award winning PS Vita is equipped with a 5" OLED, high definition touch screen, dual analog sticks, front touchscreen and rear touch pad, two cameras, built in microphone, and combined with the best gaming content, provides an unmatched portable gaming experience.

Meeting the needs of a new trendsetting generation of urban drivers, the iQ succeeds at taking big ideas and concentrating them into a small package. The iQ is a small car that offers the functionality and comfort that drivers expect from a car twice its size. The iQ comes standard with 11 airbags and features an impressive EPA rating of 37 miles per gallon on regular unleaded gas.

The Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) for the 2012 iQ is $15,265. The delivery, processing and handling (DPH) fee for all Scion models is $730 and is not included in the MSRP. DPH fee for vehicles distributed by Southeast Toyota (SET) and Gulf States Toyota (GST) may vary.

Warranty and Complimentary Scion Service Boost
Like all Scion models, the iQ is covered by a 3-year/36,000-mile comprehensive warranty and a 5-year/60,000-mile powertrain warranty. The iQ will also come standard with Scion Service Boost, a complimentary plan covering normal factory-scheduled maintenance for two years or 25,000 miles whichever comes first, and three years of 24-hour roadside assistance.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 35 Comments
      Jonathan
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow a play station . They still wouldn't sell this trash if they gave away a PS3 and 20 free games with it .
      Making11s
      • 2 Years Ago
      That's cool if you were already going to buy one, but I don't see this changing anyone's mind.
      Mike Pulsifer
      • 2 Years Ago
      The offer is good until June 31? Is this a new kind of leap year?
      Master Austin
      • 2 Years Ago
      Thats cute...Buy one toy, get one free...
      owenrec
      • 2 Years Ago
      I would love a tiny car like this if I could get it with a manual transmission and some decent gas mileage. How on earth does this only get 37mpg?
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @owenrec
        My 1.3 Toyota iQ gets around 40-41mpg (US) on a run, and around 36mpg (US) around town. That's pretty impressive for a 1.3 litre engine mated to a CVT 'box. It would be nice if the US version had the 6-spd manual in the 1.3 and the option of the 1.0 litre unit, both of which offer greater fuel economy.
      The Wasp
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm surprised no one said this yet -- I would rather buy the car at a decent price with no Playstation Vita...why the hell is this car over $15k?? Why is it over $13k? How is this not Toyota/Scion's cheapest car?
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @The Wasp
        Because it's a good quality product. The problem stems from the US mindset that small should equal cheap. Maybe it's because you've had too many rebadged old Suzuki Swifts and Kia Prides over the years.
          The Wasp
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Also don't give me the line about the compactness of European roads. If you have a road where a Yaris can't go, that's not a road -- that's a sidewalk, or a forest, or maybe you're inside a building.
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          "You guys really need to get the word out on how small European roads are and how high the taxes are -- every city I've been to there has plenty of medium and large vehicles because, as best I can guess, the owners simply haven't noticed that their vehicles don't match 'European sensibilities'" European roads aren't troublesome until you get into a major city. Indeed, there are plenty of much larger vehicles, but I'm guessing you haven't seen parking scenarios where cars are literally crambed in bumper to bumper and how drivers back ForTwos into parallel parking spaces. As far as sensibilities, what can you say about a country which thinks that four weeks minimum paid leave and Statutory Maternity Pay are "evil socialist dogma"? No wonder the US ranks way behind western Europe as a decent place to raise kids.
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          "I have traveled, quite a bit actually including several European cities. Obviously you haven't. I'm surprised, given that as a purported car enthusiast, you seem to question why these cars exist. "I didn't know European taxes are based on emissions. That would be a good argument for the iQ if it were significantly more efficient than the Yaris/other Toyotas." The iQ's 1.0 and 1.33 litre units qualify for free RFL and the lowest paid rung respectively. The Aygo, despite being a larger, A-segment full four seater, comes only with the 1 litre unit and is cheaper than the iQ. It too qualifies for free RFL, but doesn't have the same urban chic cache of the iQ. Its interior also feels cheaper. In Europe, the Yaris shares the iQs engine units and is larger still. It also offers a 1.4 litre diesel. Much of the range is cheaper than the iQ, and the design is far more anonymous - undoubtedly a deliberate ploy by Toyota since the class-beating first-generation 1998 Yaris to accommodate the smaller, more characterful models introduced since. But the iQ's big trump card comes into play when dealing with some of the ridiculous parking scenarios found in number of European cities, where a Yaris, in comparison, would simply be too large. You no doubt understand this, right? "I think you're trying to put Americans down for thinking of cars as appliances." It's true. Americans buy cars, and cross-shop segments, solely to get the best bang for the buck. As a result, many manufacturers offer diluted versions of the same cars sold in Europe and elsewhere. "I guess I can then infer that you think of the iQ as a stylish and/or sporty 'fun' car? Is that how you feel?" The iQ is certainly very stylish, very chic, and fun to drive. "If that's the case, then yes -- Americans would never consider this an exciting car." Americans don't know the word "chic", I agree. "That's not even a factor of the size, that's because it has a low-power engine, is an econobox (without the good price), and is expensive. That doesn't sound fun at all. (Don't get me wrong -- if the iQ had high fuel mileage, I would totally understand the reason behind it. But it doesn't.)" 95bhp from a car of this weight is superb. But Americans aren't used to anything with 95bhp. Ignorance is bliss. It isn't an "econobox", it's a premium microcar. And MPGs of 36mpg (US) around town and 41mpg on a run are perfectly acceptable for a 1.3 - if you have vast experience of small engines, you'd understand this to be the case. But you don't. In the land of the fat, lardy arsed, arrogant and utterly ignorant of the world, you like to think you understand small cars, but you don't. Far from it. It's one of those things Americans can't understand why they're such a laughing stock.
          The Wasp
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          I have traveled, quite a bit actually including several European cities. Obviously you haven't. (Is that how the logic works? Someone has a different point of view so I assume they haven't traveled.) I didn't know European taxes are based on emissions. That would be a good argument for the iQ if it were significantly more efficient than the Yaris/other Toyotas. I think you're trying to put Americans down for thinking of cars as appliances. I guess I can then infer that you think of the iQ as a stylish and/or sporty 'fun' car? Is that how you feel? If that's the case, then yes -- Americans would never consider this an exciting car. That's not even a factor of the size, that's because it has a low-power engine, is an econobox (without the good price), and is expensive. That doesn't sound fun at all. (Don't get me wrong -- if the iQ had high fuel mileage, I would totally understand the reason behind it. But it doesn't.) You guys really need to get the word out on how small European roads are and how high the taxes are -- every city I've been to there has plenty of medium and large vehicles because, as best I can guess, the owners simply haven't noticed that their vehicles don't match 'European sensibilities'. I'm not denying there are some narrow roads -- I'm just pointing out that most people there with cars have a car larger than an iQ (or Yaris) and they still manage to get around somehow. Maybe it's an optical illusion.
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          "Quality or not, how is this more valuable than Toyota's own Yaris? Is it higher quality than the Yaris?" Well, you have a point there from an American standpoint - because traditionally, America has been home to the most dire range of automotive products on earth. This is because of the US mentality that all small cars are appliances, and if you want to look flash, you spend between $3 and $4K on a Mustang replete with engineering from 1870. But that doesn't matter - because it looks good. In Europe and most of the rest of the world, however, things are different. The cost of motoring is relatively high, and infrastructure is much tighter than many US urban areas. If you've ever been to Rome or Paris and seen ForTwos, 107s, Twingos and the likes parked literally bumper to bumper you'll know what I mean. Furthermore, small cars have that chic factor in non-American cultures, further adding to the appeal. So when you go up through the class segments, Toyota begins with the iQ, and onto the Aygo, then the Yaris, and then the Auris. All the mainstream manufacturers largely have a similar range of offerings. Europeans have different sensibilities - most people will buy something small and economical for commuting and shopping, and they'll have a family car at home for times when they need to take out the family. If they need the utility to move their shite around on occasions, they'll rent a van. "My reasoning for saying it should be cheaper is because you can get cars with more raw materials for less money and you can also get vehicles with greater utility for less money." But your reasoning is American - cars are mere washing machines, don't forget. "The problem I have is not that 'small should equal cheap' -- it's that 'smaller with less utility should not equal more expensive'." That mentality remains en masse in America, and as a consequence, there aren't many desirable cars for the average punter to choose from. At least nothing like compared to Europe. But thank goodness Toyota, Ford, GM and the likes are now offering their European designs for greater choice Stateside. Choice is a good thing.
          subierider
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          This is a joke right?
          Tuga
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          " Also don't give me the line about the compactness of European roads. If you have a road where a Yaris can't go, that's not a road -- that's a sidewalk, or a forest, or maybe you're inside a building " Or it's a road in a city that was built centuries before cars existed. You still don't see a lot of IQs on them, because they really are very expensive, but trust me, there are roads like that.
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          "Also don't give me the line about the compactness of European roads. If you have a road where a Yaris can't go, that's not a road -- that's a sidewalk, or a forest, or maybe you're inside a building." You've never travelled, obviously. Are you also aware that in Europe, annual registration and company car tax costs are based on CO2 emissions? Thanks for playing.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      FoxJ30
      • 2 Years Ago
      great, two things nobody really wants to buy, now sold together.
      JDam4131
      • 2 Years Ago
      I looked at the sideline profile of this car and laughed my a** off >< . What market does the iQ appeal to? Seems a bit desperate, i guess the gaming device is to play so you get taken a little more seriously in the world when you pull up in this baby.
        dfosco1262
        • 2 Years Ago
        @JDam4131
        It appeals to big cities, New York, Chicago etc. I live in Madison Wi and they are all over the place. Easy to park, they do a full circle in under 11 feet.. If you are a city driver, its a great car.
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @JDam4131
        Cars like this seriously make the average American male feel insecure.
          The Wasp
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          I want you to know that I actually gave you two +1s on your earlier comments on this article. This...is incorrect, though.
        Making11s
        • 2 Years Ago
        @JDam4131
        What? You don't like the the smallest 4 seater in American costs about $6000 more than the most inexpensive car in America?
      Jeremy Pennini
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'd rather have that $250 spent on a Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 (7.0").
      subierider
      • 2 Years Ago
      This just means neither iQ or Vita is selling well...
      bg516
      • 2 Years Ago
      these little cars are really neat, at least when i looked at them in europe. perhaps if they built them with that turbo or supercharger that was talked about and a real automatic gear box it might make a difference. they are not sporty enough in the present configuration to make you want to buy one. they don't get really outstanding gas miliage and are slow. they were talked about as having the 4 cyc. engine for the states, but never did. skip the faux ipad and add some guts to the car. it's not the price that is holding this car back, it's lake of a specific character, make it appealing and you won't have to add a stupid give away to hope for sales. I own a prius, and it was and is exactly what it should be, this car isn't our cities are too big and parking too easy for create any demand for this, just look at the smart car a few years down the line. MAKE IT GO, AND YHO CAN MOVE THEM.
    • Load More Comments