It looks as if Scion may be hard at work on a new turbocharged FR-S prototype. Motor Trend nabbed a quick video of what appears to be a forced-induction version of the coupe darting around Laguna Seca. With its tall wing and sideways antics, the vehicle is likely being put through its paces by the Scion drift team, which has had to rely on specially modified TC models until now. It makes sense for the drift team to strap a turbo onto the vehicle's 2.0-liter flat four for a little extra grunt, but it's unclear if a forced-induction version of the FR-S will make its way to production.

If a hotter version of the coupe is coming down the pike, we'll have to wait for it. The first production FR-S models won't show up until summer, and any variations would trail along after that. Either way, it appears we should be able to catch a glimpse of high-performance FR-S on the Formula D circuit in no time. Hit the jump to watch the quick video for yourself.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 54 Comments
      JC914
      • 3 Years Ago
      Stay calm everyone. it's a drift team, they do engine swaps, add force induction, and other crap like this to their cars. [| ]-(86)-[ |]
      Lester
      • 3 Years Ago
      IF (I said IF) this is turbo and it is for a drift team (best guess from the wing and tail happy exit out of the turn) I would not be surprised if they shoehorned a 2.5 turbo motor from an STi in there. Being a drift car, they would have done a custom radiator and intercooler setup anyway so plumbing issues may not be a concern. Drift teams tend to go the easist most reliable route for power/engine setups so I doubt they would go through the trouble of developing a turbo system for a brand new motor when a well established setup and aftermarket is available from the current STi.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Lester
        [blocked]
        Kris
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Lester
        You are probably right.
      Jason
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wouldn't get too excited folks. This is the drift team testing their cars, doesn't mean we're going to see a turbo FR-S anytime soon...
        recharged95
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jason
        Scion knows its customers **want** a 300HP **turbo** car, but knows they are fine to buy a 170HP (tC) car. And its FR-S owners will be happy to point out there's a 300HP turbo drift car on the race circuit. Funny. In the video, no BOV sound == no turbo.. it's a Japanese sports car (BOV is mandatory!).
      Justin Campanale
      • 3 Years Ago
      FRS.... turbo *does a happy dance*
      MONTEGOD7SS
      • 3 Years Ago
      I have from the beginning considered it a sure thing that they will have a turbo version. A 2.0L boxer built by Subaru with no chance of ever having a turbo version? Yeah right. Plus, isn't Subaru moving the WRX turbo engines to a 270hp 2.0L soon? It just makes sense for this car to get the same engine.
      Guerro
      • 3 Years Ago
      "partnered with a high 12.5:1 compression ratio" Not exactly what you would call "forced induction friendly"
        Kris
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Guerro
        I'm sorry, probably when you educated yourself about compression ratio in Wikipedia you didn't knew that aftermarket parts manufacturers like Cosworth and others will sell to you pistons with lower compression ratio on very reasonable prices. The hell, they'll even make you whatever ratio you want.
          Kris
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Kris
          @Guerro, sorry I couldn't reply earlier I hope you read it. I have a simple question for you. So if you agree with me that changing the compression ratio when installing aftermarket forced induction is doable (and it is pretty common), what is the problem for the engine manufacturer to make a little tweak on its own design and build its own engine with different ratio? Is it for some reason - that I for the love of God can't think of - so hard to do it by the factory? Are the Japanese somehow stupider than the Germans who build Opel's C20XE with 10.5:1 ratio and its turbocharged version C20LET with 9:1 from the factory in the early 90's? Please, as an adult to child explain it to me!
          Krishan Mistry
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Kris
          @ Acid Tonic, that being said, regardless of fuel type, the lower compression, usually the more boost can be added before detonation problems. Race gas or E85 is fine for a track toy or drift racecar, but requiring a production car to run on 100+ octane (or risk blowing up) is simply not going to happen. Not saying that for low boost applications the FRS turbo would need a compression ratio in single digits, but 12.5:1 is pushing insanity even with direct injection. Add a turbo with such a high ratio + street gas and you wont have an engine, you have a frag grenade.
          AcidTonic
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Kris
          He probably also hasn't educated himself on how awesome a high compression motor paired with E85 is. Evo's running 10:1 compression and 20lbs+ boost all day long on E85. It's only high compression if you're running crap fuel. Race gas or E85 has no problems with higher compression because it doesn't knock as easily.
          Guerro
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Kris
          @Kris, Wikipeida, yeah, that's it. Now be quiet while the adults are talking. I was referring, of course, to a mass production turbo version. Obviously you can do what you need to lower compression before putting a turbo on this car if you are performing a turbo upgrade with aftermarket parts. From the factory, there is no way they are putting any amount of serious boost on this engine at 12.5:1. See, when you put the eBay leaf blower mod on your car, the factory couldn't give 2 ***** what happens to the engine. When the factory puts forced induction on the car, they have to worry about things like engine survivability, longevity, quality, etc. and they have to be able to warranty it.
      benzaholic
      • 3 Years Ago
      First question: How does one know the car on the track is turbocharged? Second question: Didn't we just read in the FR-S review that there wasn't really any room to turbocharge that engine in that car?
        Brandon Allen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @benzaholic
        They didn't say there wasn't any room period, they just said there isn't any room for a TMIC setup and the unequal length turbo manifold setup Subaru usually uses so something would have to be developed from scratch. The down-pipe from a WRX would just be blocked by the fire-wall on a FR-S or BRZ. The newer Legacy GT has the turbo mounted in the center in front of the engine but still uses a TMIC. I'd say there's a 50/50 chance the BRZ will get a turbo and perhaps a 75% chance the FR-S will. With the predicted price of the base BRZ coming in just under WRX territory, they'd either have to charge more for a turbo BRZ than their WRX which isn't likely or increase the price of the WRX significantly to get their performance line-up priced in a logical manner. Turbos are like Jello you see, there's always room for them!
        Kris
        • 3 Years Ago
        @benzaholic
        Well if one listens carefully, one would hear a the blowoff. And the engine noise is different than the NA, because of the unequal length headers and now sounds like the rest of the stock turbocharged Subaru's.
          Kris
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Kris
          AB it's about a time to make that "edit" button.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        SunnyDli+3
        • 3 Years Ago
        R – Race I – Inspired C – Car E – Enthusiast
        Elmo
        • 3 Years Ago
        It's not supposed to look good, you moron. A wing is put on a car for function, not style. You're not even seeing this car up close, so I don't know how you can judge a car that you can barely see.
        Phontsolo
        • 3 Years Ago
        You now look like shyte with you're retarded comment.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Phontsolo
          [blocked]
          Elmo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Phontsolo
          Your*
        AcidTonic
        • 3 Years Ago
        Actually it makes sense to only add the wide exhaust on the turbo model since those "fart cans" you describe are usually people installing 3inch exhaust for more power. Turbo motors gain the more horsepower from simply opening the exhaust restrictions than other cars get from performance mods. That's not always done for sound like you assume.
      Elmo
      • 3 Years Ago
      This IS NOT a FR-S street car. It is a drift car being tested on Laguna Seca. It's most likely Ken Gushi's FR-S that is probably replacing his tC drift car.
      Andre Neves
      • 3 Years Ago
      Glad in 2012 we are watching videos at 74p HD. Here I am with a 27" screen running 2560x1440 resolution and now I have to go out and get myself a magnifying glass to keep on the desk for situations like these. Thanks.
        Elmo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        Uh there's a full screen button on the video...
      patrialuvien
      • 3 Years Ago
      While the whining down definitely sounds of forced induction, there was no pop or pressure release normally associated with a turbo. It could very well be a supercharger too, or just a really small turbo. Very curious to hear about what gains they've made from such a strung out engine to begin with.
      RedHoodJT
      • 3 Years Ago
      Honestly, I wish Toyota would just kill Scion already. If Toyota would just bring out the Toyota GT86 here in the states as a Limited Edition vehicle, only allowing like maybe 1500 in the USA...that would be better. Plus people would want to buy the GT86 over the FRS, cause it'll be more rare. I can guarentee people will be RE-BADGING THEIR FR-S' WITH TOYOTA BADGES...cause they want the REAL THING: THE GT86. I would rather own a GT86or a BRZ than an FR-S (even though, technically, they are the same car). Quality, people. Quality.
        Rich M.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @RedHoodJT
        who cares if its a Scion or Toyota as long as it drives great. the one advantage of it being a Scion is that they won't do Market Value Adjustments with $5k mark ups because it will be a low volume car like they did with S2000 and MR-Spyder when they came out in 2000.
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