• Jul 20, 2011
The models have been made. The designs have been scrutinized. The talents have been exhibited, the ballots have been cast, and the prizes have been awarded for the 2011 Ferrari World Design Contest.

The competition attracted entries from 50 design schools and universities around the world, all vying for the eye of decision makers from both Ferrari and Pininfarina. In the end, the top prize went to a team from Korea for their innovative Eternità concept, pictured in the foreground above.

Second prize went to Samir Sadikhov from the Turin campus of the IED for his Xezri, and third place to the team from London's Royal College of Arts for the Cavallo Bianco.

Additional prizes were awarded based on proficiency with Autodesk design software (also taken by the winning Korean team from Hongik) and for the Most Unexpected Technological Solution (won by Jiangnan University). These prizes were awarded by Autodesk VP Brenda Discher and Ferrari CO Amedeo Felisa, while the top three were decorated by Ferrari chairman Luca di Montezemolo, chief designer Flavio Manzoni and Paulo Pininfarina.

Follow the jump for the full details and check out the top designs in the high-res image gallery.
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SEOUL'S HONGIK UNIVERSITY WINS FERRARI WORLD DESIGN CONTEST 2011

Students from Seoul's Hongik University have won the Ferrari World Design Contest, a competition in which 50 highly prestigious universities across the globe took up Ferrari's challenge of imagining its cars of the future. The Korean school was chosen ahead of the second-placed IED of Turin in Italy in the final with London's Royal College of Arts finishing in third position.

The first three classified models are:

1) Eternità– Kim Cheong Ju (Rep. of Korea), Ahn Dre (Rep. of Korea), Lee Sahngseok (Rep. of Korea) – Hongik University (Seoul)

2) Xezri– Samir Sadikhov (Azerbaigian) – IED (Turin)

3) Cavallo Bianco – Henry Cloke (UK), Qi Haitao (China) – RCA (London)

Following the prize-giving ceremony, Ferrari chairman Luca di Montezemolo commented: "Nurturing the creativity of young people is a fundamental strategy in every walk of life. The Ferrari World Design Contest represents a window that we want to keep open on the world and the creative energy of the next generation. I saw at first hand the many genuinely innovative ideas that these talented youngsters sent us and could feel the enormous passion and commitment that had gone into them. I am certain that some of these suggestions will come to light in the Ferraris of the future."

The Seoul students provided the finest interpretation of Ferrari's design brief for a thoroughbred hypercar brimming with new generation technologies and materials, aN extreme ("hyper") car not only in its architecture but also in every other aspect. Having completed an initial 2D design, the entrants then generated 3D models in 3D Autodesk® Alias as well as making a physical 1:4 scale model with particular emphasis on detailing and the car interior in addition to more functional concerns.

All of the design concepts focused on reducing fuel consumption through alternative propulsion systems, particularly hybrid engines. Another common thread was the boosting of driving pleasure through weight reduction. More geometric forms alternated with sinuous, almost organic lines in the various design projects.

There were also two special prizes. The "Autodesk Design Award", for the best use of Alias software in the design process, was presented by the technical partner to the contest to Hongik school. The second prize, the "Most Unexpected Technological Solution" award, went to the team from Jiangnan University (China) for the audacious technical solutions contained in The Drake concept. The prizes were presented by Brenda Discher, Autodesk's Vice President Industry Market, and Ferrari CEO Amedeo Felisa.

The three finalists, however, received their prizes from Ferrari Chairman Luca di Montezemolo, CEO Amedeo Felisa, Paolo Pininfarina, Chairman of the Pininfarina Group which has partnered Ferrari in the styling of its cars for over six decades, and Flavio Manzoni, director of the Ferrari Styling Centre, which organised the contest.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      Jorge Duran
      • 3 Years Ago
      A lot of these remind me of Renault's DeZir concept for some reason. They don't really yell "Ferrari."
      AldenBiesen
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nice designs 'n all but they don't scream Ferrari to me. In Fact, some remind me of future Lambo's.
      Burabus
      • 3 Years Ago
      really generic "future car" designs
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      IBx27
      • 3 Years Ago
      None of those look like what a Ferrari should look like. It's the same generic college art student concept car, but with a ferrari sticker on the front. Although...ferrari's don't look like what ferrari's should anymore either, now that they have the cottage-cheese-genetalia station wagon, so why not let the art students think they have the right idea?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @IBx27
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          IBx27
          • 3 Years Ago
          I do draw my own line of concept cars, you little art major, so shut the hell up. They have clean lines, no gimmicks, and in my slightly biased opinion look pretty damn good, and much more feasible than anything an art student could do. I'm a car guy and a Mechanical Engineering student, not some kid who wouldn't know what a good, clean car design is if it bit them in the Aston.
      hadji murad
      • 3 Years Ago
      these are very uninpired, in my opinion. they all look the same, epecially their proportions. all too busy, and 12 year old drawing-like
        sonicpunk32
        • 3 Years Ago
        @hadji murad
        Hmmm, "unin[s]pired" and "12 year old drawing-like," huh? Okay, please draw and submit to us your own prototype that you consider inspiring and adult-like.
          illnever tell
          • 3 Years Ago
          @sonicpunk32
          You don't need to be able to do something to critique something. Just because he can't personally do better doesn't mean that better can't be done. You're attitude is what holds back true innovation. \ You go to a restaurant and have the absolute worst butter poached lobster you've ever had, trust me you'll be complaining for the rest of the night, even though you most likely couldn't cook better. Or you just went to see Dude, Where's My Car, you'll be complaining about your wasted money because it was a piece of crap, even though you have no clue as to how to make a movie. Almost all of these are completely uninspired and lack cohesion. It looks like they just chose the lesser of all evils. I mourn. This quote comes to mind: "And this is the best that you-that the government, the US government could come up with? I mean, you're NASA for crying out loud, you put a man on the moon, you're geniuses! You're the guys that're thinking **** up! I'm sure you got a team of men sitting around somewhere right now just thinking **** up and somebody backing them up! You're telling me you don't have a backup plan, that these eight Boy Scouts right here [gestures to USAF pilots], that is the world's hope, that's what you're telling me?"
          sonicpunk32
          • 3 Years Ago
          @sonicpunk32
          You're right, sorry. I have indeed seen some horribly designed cars in the past. I do not mean to hold back innovation. But I'm interested in what was meant by them being "12 year old drawing-like." Personally, I think they're too out there and futuristic, but "12 year old like?" I don't know about uninspired, but then again, I'm no designer.
          hadji murad
          • 3 Years Ago
          @sonicpunk32
          someone needs to go to logic class. i assume you think every car is wonderfully designed since you aren't a car designer and therefore can't have a negative opinion of any of them.
        mike m
        • 3 Years Ago
        @hadji murad
        I forgot to add that Samir Sadikhov- the guy who came in second- has been doing this for awhile. I;ve been following his designs on both Car Design News and his blog: http://samirsadixov.blogspot.com/
        mike m
        • 3 Years Ago
        @hadji murad
        @illnever tell There's a big difference between the everyday disdain of a consumer and that of an art/design critic. It's a well known phenomenon when people can't quite grasp or understand a concept or a piece of art, they would resort to the "12 year old drawing" or "even my 4 year old can do that". Being critical isn't simply noting your disapproval.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @hadji murad
        [blocked]
      Paradigm ♂♂
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nice
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Paradigm ♂♂
        [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Paradigm ♂♂
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        IBx27
        • 3 Years Ago
        How would you know anything about interesting concepts, you orangutan armchair designer? You have no right to say that these look good because you didn't go to college like they did, and you're unable to appreciate their masterpieces in full glory. Don't you understand the difference between an elite, trained, professional designer and everyone else? How dare you have an opinion on the matter!
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