• Mar 24, 2011
Japan earthquake damaged roadDue to the extensive damage in Japan caused by the massive earthquake and resultant tsunami on March 11, many have questioned if the island nation can recover in a year, much less a few months. If the swiftness with which the Japanese can repair roads is any indication, we wouldn't bet against the country cleaning up this catastrophe in short order.

As a result of the quake, a 150-meter section of the Great Kanto Highway in Naka was absolutely obliterated, with massive chasms running right through the middle of the road. Work crews at the NEXCO road repair company sprang into action on March 17, working at a fevered pitch to help get their country on the road to recovery, literally. Amazingly, after only six days of labor, the road is silky smooth and ready for travel. Look at the the before and after photos above to see just how amazing this feat is.

Given the fact that road crews in the U.S. can spend three or more months repairing a single lane of concrete, only to leave the orange barrels on the road for another two weeks, we're blown away by this feat of engineering. Simply amazing.

[Source: Daily Mail via Jalopnik | Images: AP Photo/NEXCO East]


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  • 120 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      I lived in Japan for 6 years. That road is an expressway, their version of the interstate. The 2 key factors are 1) it's a toll road, & 2) the expressways are all privatized. The companies that own the expressway earn their money from tolls, but they are also solely responsible for maintenance & repair. The longer the road is closed, the more money they will lose. When government gets out of the way, private enterprise proves they can do it faster, cheaper, and better. Maybe the US will remember that lesson one of these days.
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's just a different angle guys...
      http://i.imgur.com/qxCwb.jpg
      • 3 Years Ago
      Just to show you ,that money has nothing to do with it ,,,,,,,,,,,this Japannis labors like their jobs ,,,,here in America the labors like their pay check 60 dollars an hr. ,,,,that is why the labor union take a job and milk it to make more money
      • 3 Years Ago
      I imagine it was a little easier to work on a road no one was using. All of the long running road work projects I see happen while the road is still open and being used, like on the freeway when they start from one side and kind of do a stretch of one or two lanes then expand out again and then switch sides. It'd probably go a lot quicker if they were able to shut down a complete stretch and do all lanes at the same time.
        • 3 Years Ago
        The problems I saw most was there no one at work most of the time I passed by, daytime or nighttime. Where were the workers?
        They just blocked one lane of the road for weeks, caused traffic but no workers there.
        They could have done fast, but they chose not to.
        Wasting people's time are wasting money.

      • 3 Years Ago
      A lot of fascinating comments from people engrossed into whether this was union or not.

      No one seems to care that they were pouring AC paving in near-freezing temperatures, and the picture shows three separate layers (two previous AC pavings), one right over the other, and that the picture is not exactly of the buckled portion.

      But eh, this is all about how QUICK you can repave a section, not about how durable you make it.
        • 3 Years Ago
        You are making too much sense for this nim-com-poop bunch.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Need to bring these guy's to New Jersey to work on the turn pike,,,,for 40 years the turn pike has being under construction and stiil not finish ,,,,wonder if they got union labor in Japan ????????????????
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow! The Japanese amaze me. I would love to go there and learn more about their culture. And I would put good money on this road not falling apart again unless there is another major quake. Not only do they do it fast, they do it right!
      • 3 Years Ago
      If that happened in the USA, they wouldnt even have the CONES out in 6 days yet.. and of Congress had to ok the funding, forget it, it just became a dead end road! Way to go Japan!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Its great that it can be done so fast. Too bad it will be unsafe to live in Japan and use it.


      Look out Alaska, They will be turning your state, into little Japan soon.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Major props to the Japanese. They are handling this quake/tsunami disaster like champs. I hope the best for all of them. It's good to see through all the photos of disaster that there are some strides towards recovery. That road will probably be greatly beneficial to aid. It looks like nothing happened at all.
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Japanese have shown us how much can be accomplished when motivated by "the common good."

      We seem to have forgotten that lesson.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Problem over here is, large construction companies bid for the work. Say they win it at $50/Square foot. THEN they offer it for $40 to other Companies, then THAT company lists it for $30...and on and on until Jacks Paving picks it up for $14/Sq and does the work with ancient equipment and low-rent workers.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Coupefan : You can say that again!
        • 3 Years Ago
        You can say that again.

        No corporation would have even started working on these roads in the US unless they were making oodles of money on the reconstruction.
        • 3 Years Ago
        'The common good' of the nation??? Don't say that too loud, you'll get labeled a socialist or something.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Good Job Andre! Ruin a perfectly good point by generally denigrating a person's entire nation of origin. Everyone makes mistakes and all people are sometimes wrong or have opposing points of views. Your platitude speaks very informatively about your own personal upbringing wherever that may have been.

      -sun
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