• Nov 22, 2010
Toyota has big plans for its model lineup, as the automaker intends to introduce 11 new or redesigned vehicles by 2012. This will be accomplished by offering hybrid versions of existing models, as well as introducing all-new hybrid vehicles. However, Toyota's focus isn't going to be entirely on improving the electric half of the hybrid equation. The automaker is looking at ways to produce more efficient gasoline engines, and turbochargers and direct fuel injection are both in the cards.

There's no word yet on which models will benefit from either technology first, but the initial round of products should also come equipped with start-stop technology in addition to the DI and turbo. It was hard to believe at the time, but maybe a turbocharged, hybrid MR2 really is right around the corner.

[Source: Autoweek]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 66 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      And the last Toyota turbo engine wasn't? lol
      • 4 Years Ago
      I was wondering what their next gen lineup was gonna look like :)

      Hm... Toyotas... exciting again? am i dreaming?
      • 4 Years Ago
      In my opinion, worth 2 cents, turbo-charging the family car will never work out. I see a lot of people as being very impatient and uncaring about their vehicles. Requiring them to let their car idle for a few minutes to let the turbo cool down will make a lot of towing companies very wealthy. Not to mention the car thieves :) unless of course there was a turbo timer from the factory

      http://www.mikesautorepairlg.com
      • 4 Years Ago
      Great!
      Now Honda will have it too, give 1 to 5 years lag...
        • 4 Years Ago
        Honda does have a turbo vehicle...though unfortunately so far they've limited the powerplant to the RDX.
        • 4 Years Ago
        as a 2002 WRX owner im a turbo fan myself. But i have yet to see convincing evidence that a turbo DI engine is more efficient per hp than a DI engine with more cylinders. IT seems as though applying the same modern tech to both still results in the naturally aspirated engine being more efficient.

        Example - (I know these are not DI engines) compare the Rav-4 with 267hp and 27mpg to the RDX with (240?)hp and getting 24mpg. Also throw in the MX-7 with its horrid mileage.

        The only engine that seems to be showing high hp and mileage is the hyundai 2.0L turbo. But i cant help but wonder what a non-turbo v6 with the same basic tech would produce.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Holy sht. this is awesome. Hell yea for competition
      If Honda announces an eight speed as well, all's well with the world again.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Good idea.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Why would I spend tens of thousands on this kind of toyota when I can just strap a turbo onto my toaster and get the same thing. And the toaster will be better looking and come in something other than beige.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Copy cats as usual!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Ahhh...your Japan Headquartered "Prized" Toyota is now a follower...again!!! GM and Ford have had these reliable technologies for years now...and they are American companies (designed, built, and keeping the American dollar right here in the USA). BUY AMERICAN!!!
      • 4 Years Ago
      With turbos making a major comeback, coupled with the over abundance of electronic components to break, new cars are going to be quite pricey to fix a decade from now.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Agreed. Folks just bought an Acura RDX, and I cringe to think of the repair bill the first time something goes wrong.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Having had looked under the hood of some 2009-2011 models, i have to agree with ya. Turbochargers just make everything worse.

        Some turbo cars do last a long time, but a well engineered one is rare.

        This is why i'm hoping electric cars come down in price and go up in range. That will bring back the era of simplicity that gas cars had before the 70's.
      • 4 Years Ago
      After VW started the trend and Ford and Hyundai took up the mantle.. well.. better way late than never. Half a decade late is better than the decade late they were with brake override etc.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Zamafir, and that would largely explain the unreliability of VW products especially with turbo engines... Besides, Mitsubishi was the trend setter with turbo + DI in 1996. Anyway, before the whole industry jumps on the turbo DI bandwagon, I wanna see the reliability ratings of the Ecoboost and Hyundai Turbo DI engines 3-4 years from now. The only two companies that have the turbos right so far are Subaru and Mitsubishi, rest as far as I know are rather problematic for most cases and that includes Mazda/Volvo/VW/Audi. It is all nice and well when everything is working as it should, problem is, that usually there is always something prone to go wrong. Turbo DI engines are more sophisticated in a bad way where its more difficult/expensive to fix. This is all cool for high performance cars where service intervals are every 3000 miles but for cars for everyday Joe, it could turn out to be a very expensive hobby once the warranty runs out (although KIa/Hyundai do offer a 10 year powertrain warranty, who the hell wants to go to service department and deal with all this explaining/hustling/blaming game crap).
        • 4 Years Ago
        Well is usually goes: The Germans invent something new (and complicated), the Japanese copy it, simplify it, and make it work right, and then a few years later the Domestics call it something else and say its a "new innovation!"
        • 4 Years Ago
        Because an econobox owner's #1 concern is being able to hit 130mph. O_o
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ummm, maybe not DI but Toyota has been turbocharging a lot of cars since over 2 decades ago and the reliability factor in those machines is really high as evidenced by high HP modded applications on the more common 3SGTE and 1JZGTE / 2JZGTE motors not to mention all the boosted non-US models.

        Late to the party? More like came to the party early and left to go take a nap.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "and that would largely explain the unreliability of VW products especially with turbo engine"

        No... VW's horrendous turbo issues stemmed from the 1.8T and 2.7T, neither of which were direct injection and both of which were developed last decade.

        "To him VW pioneered every innovation and trend."

        AWD in rallying and production cars, DSG, Turbo+Direct injection. Every? No. First to market with most of the relevant ones? yup. Sorry if the truth doesn't jive with your toyota love'n but it's good to see you back man, been a while. I mostly post in toyota posts cuz we miss you. Aside from the hybrid drive in the prius what other innovations have we seen from toyota in the last decade that they were first to market with and other automakers jumped on board after (as with vw and dsg, turbo+direct injection, etc)?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Id bet your 10-year old 100k mile Toyota econo-box cant hit 130mph without skipping a beat like VW/Audi 1.8T's can. Reliability what?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Does it really count as pioneering if your pioneering work scared everyone into avoiding that technology for years? Seriously, there were/are reliability problems with almost everything you listed coming out of VW. That vaunted DSG transmission was also plagued with mysterious failures (i.e. flash of death), and needless to say the transmission isn't the only part of the powertrain that VW's reliability reputation is questionable for.
        Other companies avoided these technologies in their more affordable cars because they were waiting until they would be reliable enough to put into regular cars, not because they didn't know how to install a turbocharger. Any mechanically inclined person would be able to do that, but it takes a lot more skill to make a motor that'll keep running for a decade or more without costly upkeep.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Don't mind zamafir, he's a VW worshiper. To him VW pioneered every innovation and trend.
        • 4 Years Ago
        About 15 years ago, the Toyota minivan Previa had a turbo 4 banger under the floor. Not exactly a late comer.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Most of the credit goes to VW/Audi in my book too.

        Putting a turbocharged 4-banger in a luxury car was a strong statement. I do have to reluctantly agree that despite the legend of the Ur Quattro, Audi just isn't all that good at turbochargers. Even when they led in adoption, they were not tops in reliability. Now that that's settled down a bit, they still don't do well in anti-leg or specific output. Heck, even GM buries them on this front and seems to have the bases covered on reliability too.

        But hey, they aren't alone. BMW has jumped in and is bringing their own brand of screwups to the turbo market.

        I know several Japanese companies (Mitsubishi, Toyota, Mazda, Nissan) developed a lot of good turbo tech in the early 90s too. But when gas got cheap again, they ultimately turned to V6s and forgot what the had developed, reinforcing the idea that turbos were just a poor substitute that you made do with when you couldn't afford to own/run a physically larger motor. This is the trend that VW/Audi started to reverse and everyone is building on it.

        • 4 Years Ago
        @ essende:

        In regards to your comment about the reliability of the eco-boost: http://www.autoblog.com/2010/11/22/followup-ford-f-150-ecoboost-finishes-baja-1000-in-38-hours/
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Alex, thats one race prepped car (and if you believe that this is a regular Raptor with just removed front bumper, yeah, believe the marketing hype). VW won the Dakar rally (which is even more gruelling than the Baja) with its turbo DI cars and so what, it didnt translate into reliable production turbo engines... Again, I wanna see the reliability ratings of Ecoboost engines 3/4 years from now, and since Ford and Mazda were in bed together, I know for a fact that the 2.3l turbo Mazda engine (found in MazdaSpeed 3 and CX-7) are far away from reliable.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @LesPaul1

        I never would have guessed with his picture!

        =D
        • 4 Years Ago
        Heh, you know when i think about turbos, i think about unreliable VW's and other German makes that aren't exactly reliability queens.

        While Europe may have made the turbo car mainstream, they also scared the US. Look at how many people on autoblog who mention uncertainty about turbos..
      • 4 Years Ago
      Meh, I'll just take an EcoBoost F-150 instead.
    • Load More Comments