• Aug 10th 2010 at 7:58PM
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For most of us, getting anywhere near one of the world's most legendary supercars with a power tool is a recipe for the kind of disaster that's funny later but expensive now. But Cooperider's extensive experience allowed him to tackle the big-bad Ferrari with all of the weapons in his arsenal without fret. Even with so few miles, the paint had suffered the effects of 20 years of occasional enjoyment, and as such, multiple scratches and blemishes were present all over the car. Cooperider worked out which polishing compound, pad and sealant to use with this particular car and set to work.

Follow the jump
to see how he did it...

With the multiple compound curves, inlets and ducts all over the arching bodywork of the F40, Cooperider had to spend plenty of time polishing by hand, and even went so far as to have the car's badges removed to access the harder to reach paint behind the chrome.

If you're thinking that prying the trim off an F40 takes the kind of bravery that can't be bought, Cooperider says it's all part of the job.

"I'd say probably one of the most exciting [cars] I've worked on was a 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB 4 Cam, which is, you know, a seven-figure car. At first it's a little intimidating the more expensive the car is, but you have to back up a little bit. While you have to have the appreciation for the safety aspect of it, you have to realize it's just paint," he said. "You can't let the car get the better of you."

We'll just have to take his word on that one.

As part of the F40 project, renowned Ferrari mechanic Craig Reed stepped in to disassemble a few pieces and bring the car's visible mechanical bits back to their showroom shine. The guy even took the time to individually straighten the cooling fins on the car's massive intercoolers. The finished product is a sight to behold.

If you're thinking that your personal vehicle could use this kind of attention, be prepared to pay for it. An all-out restorative job like the one the F40 just enjoyed will set you back anywhere from $5,000 to $6,000 depending on the level of paint damage. Fortunately, less-extensive jobs that take anywhere from 25-30 hours are also available. Head over to Cooperider's web site for a closer look at the F40's pampering and also to learn how to detail your own car like the pros. Cooperider even has a blog to answer common cleaning questions. We have no idea how this guy finds time to sleep.

[Images: Todd Cooperider of Esoteric Auto Detail]

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