• Dec 7, 2009
Volkswagen Up! Lite concept - Click above for high-res gallery

Volkswagen Group of America President, Stefan Jacoby, has confirmed that the next-gen New Beetle, due to hit North American as a 2012 model, will be offered with a clean diesel engine. The current New Beetle was last offered with a 1.9-liter TDI in 2006, but was discontinued the following year due to tougher emissions requirements.

In addition, the U.S. market will reportedly get an electrified version of the Up! hatchback in 2014, but it will not be the gasoline version (the diesel/electric Up! Lite concept debuted at the LA Auto Show last week). Ulrich Hackenberg, head of technical development for Volkswagen AG, says the car will be manufactured in Germany and sold in the European marketplace before it makes its way across the Atlantic.

The complete Up! lineup -- including a hatchback, minivan, and sedan -- all are slated to go on sale in Europe during 2011. but still no word on which models will make it to the U.S.



[Source: Automotive News - Sub. Req.]


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  • 24 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      A diesel hybrid makes perfect sense. Trains are diesel
      electric, so it's a proven technology that really works.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @nobody2you

        Yes trains are diesel-electric, but the engines are used as generators to power electric motors similar to the chevy volt minus batteries. I think this is more along this lines of a prius type hybrid. I havent read too much on the Up! so someone correct me if im way off base.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @ stk718 - correct, like a prius.

        @nobody2you - you aren't serious are you?
      • 5 Years Ago
      The Up! needs to be a regular hybrid, or diesel, or diesel-hybrid... anything other than just electric. This car has great style and is uniquely VW. It could be the next "Prius." But if it's electric-only, then they are missing a great opportunity.
        • 5 Years Ago
        It just needs to be diesel. end of story. the fact that it's 500 lbs lighter and gets worse fuel economy than the A2 is just ridiculous. I love the look and feel of this car but damnit, if vw managed to get 78 (US!) mpg out of the a2 at 2000lbs than what's the use of 70 out of a 1500lb car with an expensive hybrid and diesel setup with even more ludicrously expensive materials. Talk about a step back. Maybe it gets such crappy (relative) fuel economy to bolster vw's point that they'd like to focus on diesel. To go from 78mpg (and up to 89) to something lighter and more expensive a decade later? I just don't get it.
      • 5 Years Ago
      A diesel hybrid just makes sense. Good work VW.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Concur on the seemingly insurmountable situation with an inexpensive diesel hybrid. That's why the TDI-hybrid needs to be on a much more expensive car. Tying up $10+k in drivetrain alone for a $20k car doesn't make sense. On a Volt competitor at $40k it might be far more feasible assuming some amazing real world MPG (50+). Sounds like an Audi to me.
        • 5 Years Ago
        "Also, good mileage out of town + low emissions and costs in town = what negatives?"

        Cost. Double the cost of just tdi or just hybrid increase over standard cost. He already addressed it, in fact that's his main contention, he never mentions huge power figures or sportscars. Who areyou replying to?
        • 5 Years Ago
        From a cost-perspective, a diesel-hybrid makes absolutely NO sense.

        Diesels are more complex and more robust than their gasoline counterparts, so that alone adds cost and weight.

        (gas) Hybrids, while they have come a long way, are also more complex/costly than regular gasoline engines.

        Also, factor in that both diesels and electric motors are both very torquey - which is not a bad thing, but they also both tend to have low HP.

        So if you are going to have 2 powerplants, why not use two that can complement the other's weaknesses instead?

        I don't see how the highway mileage benefits of a diesel and the city benefits of an electric motor can outweight the fairly large negatives.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Yes, the only delay is both (diesel and hybrid) typically bring an increase and customer reaction thus far in focus groups has not been fond of a $4000-6000 increase for both tech in a single car, especially when VAG's already been selling cars for years that managed over 75 mpg on the highway with just tdi power.

        Anywho, I can't wait to see the production up, if it looks anything like this car, or the previous concept, i'll be getting one to replace the GTI for around the town driving.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Diesel hybrids don't make sense, except as a technology showpiece. Both diesels and hybrids are dubious as strict economic propositions; neither will save you much money and they make sense mostly as nice $25-30k cars with low running costs. Combine the two and you're talking a monstrous upcharge for minimal benefit over a hybrid gasser or diesel alone. Same way with PHEVs. They're great for folks who can afford the luxury of a car they can feel good about, but they're not money savers and they're not totally rational.

        What really makes sense are downsized, turbocharged, four-cylinder engines with mild efficiency tweaks like idle-stop, electric accessory drive, and a dual-clutch transmission. Cheaper than diesels or hybrids, and about 75% of the benefits.
        • 5 Years Ago
        zamafir

        That's what they all say, too expensive, too complex, no one will buy it...and then it's a runaway success. PSA is also working on Diesel/Hybrids with stellar fuel economy, so that means it's feasible.
        • 5 Years Ago
        about half a foot shorter, narrower and a few inches shorter. Feels about the same size as the polo in person. though it is even sexier :)
        • 5 Years Ago


        Hazdaz, A diesel hybrid does make sense from a cost perspective.

        Although heavier than a petrol (gas) engine, a diesel still gives improved mpg in the real world, not just on paper.

        And the people who would be interested in getting a hybrid are not, repeat NOT, interested in having sky high horse power. They are likely to be more interested in conserving the environment, and saving money on fuel.
        So torque vs horsepower is a meaningless topic to them.

        Also, good mileage out of town + low emissions and costs in town = what negatives?
        (bearing in mind this isn't the latest sports car)
      • 5 Years Ago
      You might be on your own if there were a mechanical problem. View my VW experience at: http://reesphotos.com/VW/
      • 5 Years Ago
      Honda, VW just created the next generation CRX!

      Look at that roof line, belt line and rear window, that's all CRX.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Damn you, double post!!!
      • 5 Years Ago
      These VW concepts could use some color, either way they will sale well in the US of A.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I'm sure every VW dude are beating it to those wheels on the Up
        • 5 Years Ago
        I'd rock them if they weren't several times more expensive than standard gallardo wheels
      • 5 Years Ago
      vw needs to move quicker. this car should be in the us by 2012 and ideally by no later than mid 2011 if vw is serious about gaining market share. 2014 is way too late!!
      • 5 Years Ago
      It is possible that a diesel-electric hybrid could pass emissions test more easily without diesel particulate filters or other complicated equipment. So maybe diesel-electric cars could sell for about the same as a DPF-equipped non-hybrid diesel car?

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