• Aug 20, 2009
If you are like most of us, you look back at your first DMV-issued driving test – that one you took with a dull nub of a pencil while standing in a crowded room – and remember racking your brain over questions that not only made no sense, but some that were downright confusing. Whether we approve of the age-old process or not, everyone eventually passes their first driving test (and it seems many forget everything the moment they hit the highways).

Now that you are well-seasoned driver with years (or decades) of experience under your seatbelt, and you know all the rules of the road, the folks over at AutoInsurance.org are offering you a chance to take a quick driving test all over again. Don't worry, this isn't a government-issued quiz (we can't recall our local DMV ever giving us a multiple-choice test with "flip him the bird" as a potential answer), and it won't count on your driving record. However, it will make you ponder about a few rules of the road that many of us have tossed into the cobweb-laden parts of our brains. Go ahead, take the test, and brag about your results in our comments section!

[Source: AutoInsurance.org]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 73 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Your Grade: C-
      72% You Passed with an Average Score

      Good enough for gov't work. ;)
      • 5 Years Ago
      The test is incorrect on many portions.

      1. The left lane CAN be used for more than just passing, on multi-lane roads. In fact, in heavy congestion, "use either lane but keep up with traffic". (Hawaii Driver's Handbook).
      2. Section 21706 of the California Vehicle Code explicitly states, " No motor vehicle, except an authorized emergency vehicle, shall follow within 300 feet of any authorized emergency vehicle."
      3. The NHTSA estimates that 7% of all accidents involve alcohol, whereas 32% of all fatalities involve alcohol.

      EXAM = FAIL.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I barely passed, mostly due to questions of "how many feet" which were totally not taught to me in drivers ed (perhaps we have low standards here in Michigan). Do many of these numbers vary between jurisdictions?
      Also, they mention 40% as the number of traffic collisions which involve alcohol which is TOTALLY WRONG. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates 40% of all FATAL accidents involve alcohol based on numbers such at the 2001 study that indicated that 12.8% of all drivers involved in fatal accident were impaired by alcohol (a number much lower than the 40% because it doesn't include the innocent people the drunkies tend to crash into).
      • 5 Years Ago
      I failed it.

      Whatever, stupid test. The ABS question was completely incorrect.
        • 5 Years Ago
        My point was, Rich, was that steering ability SHOULDN'T be related to breaking - period.

        Unless you are in an emergency situation, you shouldn't be breaking while turning..and if you're not breaking while turning, obviously ABS is irrelevant. Any friction used for acceleration or de-acceleration can't be used for turning..
      • 5 Years Ago
      67% and proud of it!
      • 5 Years Ago
      I don't flip birds in case I get improper hand signal tickets.

      C+
      • 5 Years Ago
      Thank God other California drivers out there pointed out the corrections. I failed, but I live down the street from three different schools. Each school is 25mph. This quiz was an epic fail.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Well that's "unless otherwise marked", but you're right enough: Arizona marks all school zones with the default speed limit of 15mph.
      • 5 Years Ago
      @ cheeseguy21: RE: "It depends on where you live. In Calirfornia, pedestrians have right of way at all times, and do so in many cities as well.", do you have the vehicle code for this? I've never been able to locate it.
      Derek
      • 5 Years Ago
      Apparently I also "barely" passed. Why I should care or have to know the percentage of accidents where alcohol is involved is stupid. And is there a single person here who if their low beams went out but their high beams still worked wouldn't keep driving until they were in a better place to leave their car? No way am I just pulling over with hazards for that one.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Derek
        The hand signal was one of the few questions there that actually mattered. Lots of motorcyclists and bicyclists use those signals to make their own visibility more apparent. The least you could do is remember a few simple signals to know what they are trying to tell you.
        -N
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Derek
        Now I remember, I think a right hand turn is exactly the opposite of what the diagram showed. Instead of pointing your hand down you point it up. Of course it's been 30 years since I took drivers ed.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Derek
        Ha - exactly. Those are the ones I got wrong too.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Maybe they should make the driving tests in America more strict to weed out the bad drivers.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I failed, I guess my perfect drivers record is useless against this test. Looks like I need to get off the road.

      I missed the percentage of accidents, the distance questions ( I thought you have to be 1,000 feet from an emergency vehicles), which car had the right away, and pedestrians rights.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I don't think that this is really true, because I believe that knowing how to drive is not just by taking test by writing,but doing this would really make you able to know how to do this.


      http://hostwisely.com
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