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2009 Honda Fit - Click above for a high-res image gallery

According to a report from Japan's Nikkei business daily, Honda plans to finally bring a gas-electric hybrid version of the Fit to market by the end of next year. The Fit Hybrid's arrival – a year and a half ahead of scheduled – is one part of a three-pronged approach to introduce more gas-electric models into the automaker's line-up. The initial step was the release of the 2010 Honda Insight, which will be followed by the debut of the production CR-Z later this year at the Tokyo Motor Show, and could be joined by an all-new Civic Hybrid. Rumors have swirled for months that Honda plans to bring another hybrid model to their home-town show stand, and with an on-sale date of fall 2010, the Fit Hybrid could be what all the fuss is about. However, we've been seeing reports about the gas-electric Fit's imminent arrival since 2006, so until it rolls onto the floor in Tokyo and U.S. distribution is confirmed, hold off on putting deposits at your local dealer.



[Source: Nikkei via Reuters]


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  • 33 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      a fit hybrid? this is a joke, right? Pretty sure the hyrbid motor is half the weight of a fit!
      • 5 Years Ago
      Why hybrid Fit??? are they dumb? why cant they kept their promise and sell DIESEL engine for Accord, Civic, Fit, Oddy, CR-V, Element,Ridgeline And stop the stupid hybrid war with the stupid boring company toyota who kept copying Honda here and there.
      • 5 Years Ago
      "Dm789 -Why hybrid Fit??? are they dumb?"

      Hmmm. So Dm ,are you saying your smarter than the collective Honda engineering staff?? Be careful....with "Dm" in your posting your already 1/2 way to answering your own question.
      • 5 Years Ago
      We need more body styles, not more hybrids; Accord wagon, Stream, JDM Ody....
      • 5 Years Ago
      I can't really imagine it getting better mileage than the Insight. It would seem logical that it would use essentially the same drivetrain as the Insight since the Insight is based off of the Fit platform. The Fit is less aero friendly than the Insight though, so wouldn't that hurt the mileage? And where to the batteries go? Will the impede on the ability for the magic seats to create the huge cargo space that the Fit is known for? And if they do, what's the point?
        • 5 Years Ago
        the Fit is about 200lbs lighter than the civic sedan though... any aerodynamic losses would probably be made up by the weight advantage
        • 5 Years Ago
        What does the Civic have to do with the Fit vs. Insight? The Insight weighs a bit more than the Fit, but adding batteries and a motor to the Fit would make it weight the same or more than the Insight in all likelyhood considering the amount of weight cutting that was done on the Insight to keep it fairly light for a hybrid.
      • 5 Years Ago
      For a car that small it just dosen't add up to the wallet. Just buy a Volt or a Smart . Either go all electric or make a great 3 or 4 banger.

      THIS IS THE FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN B-SEGMENT...
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEY5wycJtIE
      • 5 Years Ago
      Hmmm... this might be the hybrid that makes the most sense.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I'm inclined to agree. If they use the 98 hp 1.3-liter Four sold in JDM and Euro-market Fits, I see no reason why this couldn't match or exceed the Prius' 50 MPG figure.

        Also, the price premium for the JDM Jazz Hybrid is pretty mild: the Jazz starts at the equivalent of $12,600; the Jazz Hybrid, $15,800. Extrapolated, that puts the price for the USDM Fit Hybrid just over $18,000.

        The big question is how the Fit's cargo space and rear-seat-folding magic will be affected by the battery packaging. They haven't done such a good job with the Civic Hybrids in this regard.
        • 5 Years Ago
        This will be the cool hybrid.
      • 5 Years Ago
      @ P.V.: "A jump from 15 mpg to 30 mpg is actually a bigger jump than from 30 mpg to 300 mpg. Do the math (in gal/(100 mi)). It's true."

      2 is greater than 10 ? That's not right.
      • 5 Years Ago
      what is the point of having a true line of hybrid cars like Civic Hybrid, Accord Hybrid and now a Fit Hybrid. Where does the Insight stand now.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Sweet! Now whom do I make the check out to?
        • 5 Years Ago
        It's gonna be an awful big cheque for a car in this segment.

        I was helping my parents shop around for a small car to supplement their Dakota quad cab back when it cost $110 to fill the Dakota.

        They looked at absolutely everything small, and the Fit was at the top of the list until we discovered how much the bloody thing costs (try adding just air conditioning!).

        They ended up buying a half-model-year-old Mazda 3 for $1000 less and got a car with 45 more horsepower and way more torque, similar city mileage, a sunroof, 4-wheel discs, 16" alloys, a better stereo...

        Obviously the Fit will have better fuel economy, and don't get me wrong, I like the idea of the car, but when you're only paying $40 a month for gas is dropping to $32 really all that important?
      • 5 Years Ago
      This hybrid makes the LEAST sense. You'll get much more bang for your buck by making full sized pickup trucks, which are needed in our society, to be hybrids. As GM has done. Way more gas savings.
        • 5 Years Ago
        ...and lord knows GM always does everything right.

        GM's Hybrid trucks are overpriced top trim lines. If Honda snuck a Hybrid drivetrain in the next Ridgeline and priced it right people might actually have a reason to buy one. Ford's ecoboost engines in their F-150's will do more to cut emissions than all the Priuses on the road. The Corolla was already a efficient vehicle so making the Prius didn't change much. Truck sales are massive and they are the least efficient vehicles. Making them even 5% more efficient will make a much bigger difference.

        Personally I am disappointed by Honda's IMA system. It was cool in the original Insight but looks dated compared to Toyota and Ford's current designs.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I wrote this before here, but GM sold 122 Chevy Silverado hybrids in first 3 months of 2009......................COMBINED
        • 5 Years Ago
        +1. Hybrid V8 pickups would represent "more bang for your buck" if they sold in quantities roughly equal to hybrid compacts, but with no market demand, they're just a waste of engineering resources.

        Which is really too bad, since it's a great idea in theory. But I don't understand how GM could have anticipated any other outcome--when you've spent millions selling commuters on pickups by marketing them as four-wheeled 12oz steaks (and anything less would make them less of a man), you don't turn around and sell the same people tofu.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Hybrid full sized trucks don't work because no one that actually uses a truck as a truck would ever buy a hybrid truck. Real work truck buyers buy diesels because over the life of the vehicle they have lower fuel costs than gassers and when work needs to be done on them the same technicians that work on their diesel heavy equipment can also work on their truck. Real work truck buyers would not buy a truck that sacrifices payload with a thousand pounds of batteries, or couldn't be worked on in the diesel shop that services all their other stuff. I come from a small town in the midwest where nearly everyone has a truck and uses them as such. I hear all the time how they wish they could get a diesel in a half ton but the manufacturers are too stupid to realize it. I haven't found anyone that uses trucks that would even consider a hybrid, but they would all jump on a diesel.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Coolio is right in the context of more gas savings. Convert mi/gal to gal/(100 mi) and you'll see why. This is why European fuel economy quotations are often in L/(100 km). A jump from 15 mpg to 30 mpg is actually a bigger jump than from 30 mpg to 300 mpg. Do the math (in gal/(100 mi)). It's true.
        Anyway, this hybrid makes a lot of sense because it has more utility than the Prius and Insight despite being smaller on the outside. It also (sort of) looks the part too. I would buy one.
        • 5 Years Ago
        There is no market demand for large/truck SUV hybrids because people don't stop to think that increasing the fuel economy of a gas guzzler saves more money than putting a hybrid powertrain in a small vehicle that already gets great mileage.

        Going from 50 MPG to 60 MPG is a 15% increase in fuel economy. Going from 20 to 30 is a 50% increase in fuel economy. Not everybody's family can fit inside a Fit.

        It's now all about bragging rights on who has the best fuel economy. Instead of spending a few million the Insight's development budget to get one more MPG better fuel economy, Honda could have put the money towards developing a better interior and refining the car so it doesn't sound like a tin can when you close the doors.

        The fuel economy wars are as pointless as the horsepower wars in the past.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Actually we already have this. It is called the Insight.

      The Insight is essentially a more aerodynamic version of the fit. The front clips underpinnings are from the Fit.

      This will not get better MPG than the Insight. It will likely get worse due to poorer aerodynamics.
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