• Jan 7, 2008
Europeans anxiously awaiting their chance to buy a Chery will have to cool their heels a little longer. Chery's delaying the export of their B21, but it's not for anything major like crash performance woes. According to suppliers, Chery has pushed back production so they can revamp the interior design. The fitment that appeals to the Chinese domestic market is less thrilling to European buyers, so the cabin will get some attention before the B21 swings into production later this year. It won't be long until these cars start finding European buyers. Chery and its peers are getting their collective acts together and while these cars are currently punchlines, they won't be for long.

[Source: Automotive News - Sub. Req., Photo: Autoblog Chinese]



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  • 21 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      The car on the picture appears to miss the front breaks. I hope it has its steering wheel attached to the steering mechanism when it goes on sale in Europe.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Thats a good thing they are reworking the interior. Shiny plastic wood and pleated shiny leather looks pretty tacky.
      • 7 Years Ago
      "According to suppliers, Chery has pushed back production so they can revamp the interior design. The fitment that appeals to the Chinese domestic market is less thrilling to European buyers, so the cabin will get some attention before the B21 swings into production later this year"

      A Chery exec: "Oh, you mean cardboard dashboards and faux climate control panels don't appeal to the European market?"
      • 7 Years Ago

      While everyone is focusing on the Chinese one must not forget that Indian cars too are on the way. Already Jaguar and Land Rover are on the way to becoming Indian owned companies. Soon Indian automotive brand names might start selling in Europe.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Jag and Land Rover are about to have their names dragged through the mud and any quality Ford injected in the brands is about to be removed and then some. Sad really.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Jeez Frylock, xenophobic much? Tata is a large, well managed conglomerate. Turning the traditional model on it's head, the Indians will be telling Jaguar and Land Rover how to run the company while the product is manufactured in England. Tata wants to get into the global automotive business, and purchasing two well-known brands avoids having to build a name from zero. I honestly think that Tata will be very successful.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Actually Tata is a highly respected brand and that is who the Union wanted to be sold to. They will be fine
      • 7 Years Ago
      "Chery and its peers are getting their collective acts together and while these cars are currently punchlines, they won't be for long."

      I completely agree with this statement. It will only take a couple product cycles for these cars to at least match the current Kia's and Hyundai's. They will be laughed at for the next decade but could easily surpass Japanese automakers if China mimics the Japanese business and design models of 20 years ago. That is if they don't start using mercury lined air filters and lead lined air bags.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Shawn: There is a difference between "a couple product cycles" and "a couple of years". For most auto manufacturers, one product cycle = about 4 years.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Price and slave labor. I work with many Chinese people and they are tenacious and hard working. They are also VERY business minded.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Shawn
        Disgree with your dogma:

        "most if not all of Chinese technology is either stole or taken from someone else"

        History/future proved /will prove you were/are wrong.

        • 7 Years Ago
        Big Rocket, my mistake. It still doesn't answer the question why anyone think the Chinese can overtake the Japanese or even the Koreans. What is the basis of that argument?
        • 7 Years Ago
        To Shawn:

        你的有些观点使你有点像“井底之蛙”。因为你“只见树木、不见森林”,还有些“骄傲自满”,一点儿都不懂得“居安思危“,更不懂得“风水轮流转“、“三十年河东,三十年河西”。那咱们就“骑驴看唱本--走着瞧“!
        • 7 Years Ago
        graviton, like I said, the Chinese are hard workers and they have massive manufacturing capacity. They can probably price the car below anything else. However, Japanese didn't succeed by that. Japanese products are known for quality and innovation. Those are the 2 things the Chinese products do not have.

        I don't see the Chinese catching up with the Japanese for two reasons: First, Japanese aren't sitting around waiting for others to catch up. They work just as hard or even harder. Second, Chinese industries will be limited by their system of government. Social change will be happen when more people have higher standard of living...Chinese people will demand freedom and rights. I just don't see how the people in power will let that happen. We are not dealing with a government where people are free to think, speak or even breed according to their will. If you have ever done business in China you know the restriction and brutality for which they deal with any critic.
        • 7 Years Ago
        GSP: If you think you have a valid point, feel free to share it in English. This isn't http://cn.autoblog.com
        • 7 Years Ago
        I disagree with your assessment because China has been mimicking the Japanese industries for some time now, and they have not accomplished your stated goal in any industry. I don't understand why, or maybe you can explain, that you think the Chinese will do in a couple of years what Koreans couldn't in a decade.

        I been doing business in China for many years, and I love visiting there and love the people. However, I just don't see them being able to overtake the Japanese in 2 years. Mainly because most if not all of Chinese technology is either stole or taken from someone else. Their industries lack innovation.

        Their greatest resource is obviously the enormous manufacturing capacity. There is an uncertainty on how the Chinese government will react when more of their citizens demand more freedom and rights. We can't ignore the sheer brutality of their policies. It’s hard to predict the future of a government that will murder or imprison a citizen for merely speaking or writing critical remarks.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Shawn - to put it in the proper context, it took the Japanese auto manufacturers more than a decade to approach respectablity.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Yes they did. The point is? It took a particular team 6 years to win the World Cup, therefore every single team will win a World Cup every 6 years following the same strategy?
      • 7 Years Ago
      Hopefully they don't paint these things with lead paint.
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