• Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
  • Image Credit: Renault
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While F1 engine manufacturers haven't exactly succeeded in getting the FIA to open up engine development again, a loophole will allow them to make certain modifications over the course of next season.

Renault is a company accustomed to winning in Formula One. In the past ten years alone, it has claimed an unfathomable six world championships, first with Fernando Alonso two years in a row and then powering Sebastian Vettel and Red Bull Racing to four consecutive titles. But suffice it to say that things haven't been going so well this season since the introduction of the new hybrid turbocharged V6s as Mercedes-Benz has stolen its thunder. The teams it supplies aren't happy, and neither is the

Engine development is typically frozen in Formula One. So the Renault R27 engine that propelled Sebastian Vettel to the championship last season, for example, was by and large the same one that drove him to his previous three titles, and the same design that has motivated countless other Red Bull, Lotus, Caterham, Williams and Renault challengers since 2007. But for 2014 the FIA has completely changed the rulebook, ditching the 2.4-liter V8 engines and their Kinetic Energy Recovery System for an