• Before
  • After
  • An actual fender roller beats the taped baseball bat we used on one of our original project cars. It bolts onto the hub and allows adjustments for both length and angle. We spent a good 15-20 minutes on each side, to ensure a clean roll without any adverse affects to the paint.
  • With the front wheel off, we were able to remove the three, 18 mm lower strut bolts.
  • After a fair amount of tugging, the caliper and brake came off and were quickly zip-tied to avoid pulling on the brake and ABS lines.
  • Removed the three, 13 mm bolts holding the strut top to the tower and were able to pull the whole strut/spring combo out.
  • We can't emphasize how important it is to have the right tools for the job. The spring compressor made our lives infinitely easier, allowing us to safely compress the spring to remove it from the strut. While it's doubtful that you have one of these laying around your garage, finding a local shop to perform this risky business will save you a serious headache and the deductible for your medical insurance.
  • Adjusting the arms to hold the spring firmly in place.
  • The 22 mm bolt to remove the top hat is hidden by a dust cover. Yank that off and you can pull the hat out, along with the bumpstop. The H&R kit recommends that you reuse the stock bumpstop. Ours were slightly worse for the wear, but were still usable. If they've deteriorated to the point of crumbling in your hands, don't skimp out on replacing them.
  • Laying the bolt back on before reusing the top hat on the new H&R unit.
  • The top hat about to be placed back on the spring press.
  • Everything is lined up and ready for the new strut.
  • Putting the new strut through the bottom of the spring, held in by the press.
  • About to tighten everything down. Wait... we're forgetting something...
  • Bump-stop!
  • H&R recommends cutting 3/4s of an inch from the bump-stop to allow it to sit flush. Gardening sheers FTW!
  • Okay. Everything is where it should be and we can install the strut and top hat to the spring.
  • With the whole unit assembled we can install the three, 13 mm bolts back into the top of the strut tower.
  • With everything tight up top, fit the brake and hub to the strut.
  • It helps to have a jack around to lift the brake/hub into place. From there, you can replace the three, 18 mm bolts and torque them to spec.
  • The brake and ABS line clip should be removed from the stock strut and fitted to the threaded dowel on the H&R unit.
  • With the clip reinstalled, you can route the brake and ABS lines around, making sure there's sufficient slack and suitable clearance from the wheel and tire.
  • In order to get to the strut towers in the rear, you have to remove the majority of the carpeting in the trunk. Be patient, but firm. It will come out, but take care not to rip any of the carpeting and be sure to remove the wire that actuates the fuel filler door.
  • After ripping the back of your hands to shreds on the coarse carpeting, you'll finally find the strut tops hidden underneath the speaker boxes. The speaker boxes don't need to be removed, as long as you've got a small enough socket and some patience. Two, 13 mm bolts hold the top hat to the strut towers.
  • Remove the 18mm lower shock bolt.
  • Remove the strut.
  • While we can't entirely recommend pulling out the rear spring with a pry bar, but it works and it's even quicker when you pry from the bottom. Afterwards, you can get a monkey to put pressure on the rotor so you can install the new spring.
  • Said monkey applying force to brake caliper to slot in the spring.
  • You can pry the rubber dust cap off, assuming it didn't come out when you pulled it through the shock tower.
  • FYI, it's a PITA
  • Unscrew the 17 mm nut and transfer it over to the new strut...
  • ... along with the rest of the hardware from the old strut.
  • Piece it together.
  • Some more...
  • Complete!
  • Torque it down and then reassemble in reverse order. And you're done.
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