• Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum

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    When a sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum opened up in Bowling Green, KY and gobbled up eight important examples of the American sports car in February, videos almost made it look like the hole picked the perfect spot to do the most damage to as many vehicles as possible. None of the cars made it away unharmed, but some were luckier than others. The Skydome sinkhole quickly became a national sensation, and Chevrolet smartly stepped in to offer restoration assistance with the damaged cars.

    Preservation or restoration. That's the question that faces anyone dealing with classic cars, and it's the issue with which the National Corvette Museum is grappling in the wake of the sinkhole that opened up in its midst this past February.

    Since the catastrophe, attendance has shot up 59 percent.

    The people at the National Corvette Museum are hoping to turn a catastrophe into an opportunity for continued success. Since all eight cars eaten by the 40-foot wide and 60-foot deep sinkhole were removed and put on display, the museum has seen an uptick in visitors to check the wrecked 'Vettes out. According to CNN, attendance was up over 50 percent for March. The next step might be stabilizing the hole and making it a permanent part of the Skydome hall along with some of the most damaged cars.

    Recovery and reconstruction efforts at the National Corvette Museum are moving forward on schedule since a sinkhole erupted in the middle of the museum's Skydome about two weeks ago. As of a few days ago, a crane was in place on a reinforced portion of floor to begin lifting the rare copies of America's favorite sports car from the Earth.

    If you've been following the news from Bowling Green, you know all about the sinkhole that opened up underneath the National Corvette Museum on February 12 and swallowed eight cars whole. You'll also know that officials have a plan in place to extract the cars from the ground and send them to Chevrolet in Michigan for full restoration. But in between, you might get a chance to see the damaged cars in their banged up, unrestored state.

    The rescue of the eight Corvette display cars that were eaten by a sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum last week has begun. Unfortunately, two of the cars are so thoroughly buried in soil and debris that they have not yet been seen. At least a geologist on scene says that he has not seen any further movement in the cars since the Earth consumed them.

    It wasn't any easy thing for any Corvette enthusiast to see, but the sinkhole that appeared last week at the National Corvette Museum tore a hole of its own in the hearts of Kevin and Linda Helmintoller. That's because their car was one of the eight Vettes that was sucked into the pit in Bowling Green. So rather than sit at home in Tampa, they drove 13 hours from Florida to Kentucky to see what was going on first hand.

    The eight cars swallowed up when a sinkhole erupted in the middle of the National Corvette Museum earlier this week will be sent to General Motors Design's Mechanical Assembly, which handles restorations for the GM Heritage Collection, in Warren, MI for full restorations. Vice President of Design, Ed Welburn, will oversee the process.

    New Videos Also Survey Destruction With R/C Helicopter

    If you've been with us all day, you know that the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, KY was struck by a sinkhole early this morning. The sinkhole, which formed under the museum's well-known Skydome, swallowed up eight cars on display and caused untold dollars in damage. We've shown you the early photos, we've shown you streaming webcam footage and still photos of workers moving other Corvette display cars out of harms way, and now we have security camera footage showing the actual moment

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