LX 4dr Front-wheel Drive
2015 Honda CR-V

MSRP

$23,445
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Smart Buy Avg. Savings

N/A
EngineEngine 2.4LI-4
MPGMPG 27 City / 34 Hwy
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2015 CR-V Overview

Honda sold 335,000 CR-Vs in 2014, meaning the long-running compact CUV accounted for one in every four Honda-badged vehicles sold. And honestly, it's not too difficult to see why. It's efficient, comfortable, reasonably well equipped and reliable, much as it has always been. While it's arguably the least-exciting entry in what is, to be frank, a fairly dull class, the CR-V has always been remarkably competent at being all the vehicle its customers could possibly need. The facelifted 2015 model is all of those things and more, as we found out during a full week at the helm. Honda has been remarkably consistent in the slow evolution of the CR-V's styling over the years. If you were to compare the rear of the third-generation model (released way back in 2007 and updated in 2010) with the back of this fourth-generation version (released in 2012 and freshened for this most recent model year) you'd be hard pressed to tell one from the other. The 2007 model featured tall taillights that got wider at the bottom, while a low rear bumper, large aperture and upright tailgate made access to the rear cargo area a piece of cake... just like the 2015 model shown above. Honda has been more progressive in front for its new CR-V, however, retaining the same wide, canted headlights and three-slat grille that first appeared in 2012, but this time lining them in LED accents (as is the trend nowadays). As for the interior, the material quality is easily among the best in this fiercely competitive segment, with soft, attractive dashboard plastics. We aren't crazy about the faux leather stitching, although that's true on a lot of vehicles in this class. Other accents, like the thin strip of faux wood at the bottom of the dash, look good and have a quality feel. The leather-wrapped steering wheel is a nice item, too, and we couldn't be happier about Honda's decision to replace the old-fashioned ruched leather on the seats with cleaner, tauter hides. Those seats are quite wide and comfortable, as well, although they aren't exploding with side support for cornering (it's a Honda CR-V, after all). Visibility is excellent fore, aft and laterally, regardless of how you set up the seat. In back, leg and headroom are both in abundance, while the bench seat should prove adequate throughout a family's normal use, or on long drives. That isn't to say there aren't problems in the cabin, though. Honda's bizarre two-screen center stack still isn't particularly intuitive, and the touchscreen infotainment system was a source of scorn during our week behind the wheel. For reasons that are clear only to Honda, the only traditional buttons are on the left side of the screen and are tiny, indistinguishable and feel particularly cheap. Instead, you're forced to work through the touchscreen for virtually everything, including simple functions like changing the radio station. The other tech items offered as standard on our Touring level tester, though, worked just fine. Honda's excellent Lane …
Full Review

2015 CR-V Overview

Honda sold 335,000 CR-Vs in 2014, meaning the long-running compact CUV accounted for one in every four Honda-badged vehicles sold. And honestly, it's not too difficult to see why. It's efficient, comfortable, reasonably well equipped and reliable, much as it has always been. While it's arguably the least-exciting entry in what is, to be frank, a fairly dull class, the CR-V has always been remarkably competent at being all the vehicle its customers could possibly need. The facelifted 2015 model is all of those things and more, as we found out during a full week at the helm. Honda has been remarkably consistent in the slow evolution of the CR-V's styling over the years. If you were to compare the rear of the third-generation model (released way back in 2007 and updated in 2010) with the back of this fourth-generation version (released in 2012 and freshened for this most recent model year) you'd be hard pressed to tell one from the other. The 2007 model featured tall taillights that got wider at the bottom, while a low rear bumper, large aperture and upright tailgate made access to the rear cargo area a piece of cake... just like the 2015 model shown above. Honda has been more progressive in front for its new CR-V, however, retaining the same wide, canted headlights and three-slat grille that first appeared in 2012, but this time lining them in LED accents (as is the trend nowadays). As for the interior, the material quality is easily among the best in this fiercely competitive segment, with soft, attractive dashboard plastics. We aren't crazy about the faux leather stitching, although that's true on a lot of vehicles in this class. Other accents, like the thin strip of faux wood at the bottom of the dash, look good and have a quality feel. The leather-wrapped steering wheel is a nice item, too, and we couldn't be happier about Honda's decision to replace the old-fashioned ruched leather on the seats with cleaner, tauter hides. Those seats are quite wide and comfortable, as well, although they aren't exploding with side support for cornering (it's a Honda CR-V, after all). Visibility is excellent fore, aft and laterally, regardless of how you set up the seat. In back, leg and headroom are both in abundance, while the bench seat should prove adequate throughout a family's normal use, or on long drives. That isn't to say there aren't problems in the cabin, though. Honda's bizarre two-screen center stack still isn't particularly intuitive, and the touchscreen infotainment system was a source of scorn during our week behind the wheel. For reasons that are clear only to Honda, the only traditional buttons are on the left side of the screen and are tiny, indistinguishable and feel particularly cheap. Instead, you're forced to work through the touchscreen for virtually everything, including simple functions like changing the radio station. The other tech items offered as standard on our Touring level tester, though, worked just fine. Honda's excellent Lane …Hide Full Review