The storied General Motors' EV1 is in the spotlight once again, thanks to the "Race to the Museum" public voting promotion at the National Museum of American History. A main subject of the 2006 film Who Killed the Electric Car?, most EV1s were destroyed in 2003. A few were made inoperable and given to universities and museums with the caveat that the vehicles may never be driven out on public roads. Earlier this month, one of the few surviving EV1s was spotted on Google's Street View, piquing the public's curiosity yet again. We mentioned the Smithsonian's "Race to the Museum" a few days ago, but thought a bit of history we found on All Cars Electric is worth noting.

Back in 2006, conspiracy theorists were abuzz over news that just weeks after being granted a spot at the National Museum of American History, the Smithsonian decided to remove the EV1 from display. At the time, Smithsonian spokeswoman Michelle Werts told the Washington Post, "There was no pressure from GM to remove the car from display," claiming that the issue was purely logistic in nature: the museum was about to undergo renovations in September and the space was needed to display another vehicle.

Chris Paine, director of Who Killed The Electric Car? and the upcoming Revenge Of The Electric Car, said in 2006 that the EV1 should never have been in the museum in the first place:
It's so sad that EV1 is being portrayed as history. It's not an example of 'failed' technology. It's an example of what the 21st century can be in this country, if we had the willpower to do it. The Smithsonian should take the car out of the museum and put it back on the road.
With the Chevrolet Volt and the Nissan Leaf now on the road, perhaps times have changed enough to put the EV1 into history. Follow this link to get your vote in before January 11, 2011. Only the top two vote-getters will be included in the exhibit, and the EV1 is currently sitting in fourth place by a long shot.

[Source: All Cars Electric]

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