• Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Lorenzo Marcinno
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi
  • Image Credit: Alberto Bornaghi

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If you've been looking at the seven-figure price tags (plus or minus) on the latest batch of hypercars, and wondering how their manufacturers could possibly charge that much, consider that their predecessors typically traded at well above their list price as it is. The Ferrari Enzo, for example, listed for "only" $650k, but with production limited to 349 units, demand far outstripped supply, driving the mark-up into seven-figures. In fact Enzos are still selling for a million or more at auction.

In the late 1970s, performance cars suffered a huge blow when the necessity for better economy and lower emissions crippled their power. It took nearly a decade for the horsepower to return. Today, we're in the middle of another push for greater vehicle efficiency, but don't expect another era of malaise this time. Instead, lightweight materials, turbos and hybrids mean that everyone can be happy. However, the pressure to clean up isn't just for the mass market, supercars must improve too, but F

Niche though its products may be, Ferrari typically rolls out a new model every year. 2009, for example, saw the introduction of the California. In 2010 came the 458 Italia, followed by the 458 Spider in 2011. In 2012 we greeted the FF, and in 2013 both the F12 Berlinetta and 458 Speciale. This year the hyper-exotic LaFerrari was joined by the California T, and you can bet that Maranello will keep up that pace by rolling out new versions of and replacements for each of these models in succession

The Red Icing And Candles On This Year's Hybrid Hypercar Cake

What a year it's been for enthusiasts who love high-performance, higher-dollar automobiles. The past twelve months or so have been consumed with the three horsemonsters of today's hybrid hypercar enlightenment: the Porsche 918 Spyder, the McLaren P1 and the Ferrari LaFerrari. Getting into just two of the three would be better than a lump of coal in one's stocking come holiday time, but for me, it'd still leave things feeling sadly incomplete, gnawing from within 'til the end of days.