• Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
  • Image Credit: Yamaha
Yamaha PED1A big player in the two-wheeled world is hopping into the electric market. Yamaha's PES1 (pictured above) and PED1 (pictured right) battery-powered concepts are going into production in the near future, the company announced. Both bikes originally debuted at the 2013 Tokyo Motor Show.

According to Visor Down, the Yamaha disclosed in its annual report that both cycles would be in production by 2016. "In addition to the advantages of being electrically powered, these motorcycles will offer the operability expected by existing motorcycle fans, together with a new riding experience," said a portion of the announcement.

If their skeletal looks don't give it away, these are some very light motorcycles. In concept form, Yamaha reported that the PES1 sport bike weighed less than 221 pounds, and the PED1 dirt bike weighed less than 187 pounds. Power came from a removable lithium-ion battery pack and brushless DC motor that were housed in a monocoque frame that was shared by both cycles. The concepts were equipped with a transmission with both manual and automatic modes.

Yamaha hasn't released performance figures for either bike yet. However, an earlier video suggested that the top speed of the PES1 was limited to 62 miles per hour. Granted, that was the concept version, and the production model could be faster.

Considering that Yamaha has a long and storied history of building fantastic bikes with internal combustion engines, we have high hopes it can do the same to challenge the electric cycle world.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 33 Comments
      jeremie
      • 1 Year Ago
      It will be interesting to see how this stacks up to offerings from Zero and Brammo. Range and performance is already pretty good, and they make a compelling case for low operating and maintenance costs. It's that initial purchase price that needs to come down for these bikes to really take off.
      scraejtp
      • 1 Year Ago
      Curious to see the range, performance, and price. I would hope a major manufacturer would be able to bring price down compared to the current competition. I'd like to replace my ICE motorcycle as maintenance seems like a chore each season. A belt driven electric bike should essentially be maintenance free.
      jonnybimmer
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'd love to get that PES1 for commuting around the city, although a top speed of 62 means that I wouldn't be able to take freeways safely. Hopefully the pricing is below 10k, otherwise just might as well go for a Zero S. Also wonder what the range is too. Doesn't need to be 100+ miles, but I'd be wary if it was below 60.
      BKdroid
      • 1 Year Ago
      My personal wishlist for the PED-1 (as a dirtbike rider): * low weight (187lbs is great, check) * Range for hard riding of >2hrs with a 30min reserve * performance equivalent to 300cc two-stroke/450 thumper * price <$10k. I'd be very interested if they could hit those marks, but I don't hold out much hope for it. The range will probably be limited as a side effect of lightening (smaller battery). And the price is most likely going to be over $12k if they can keep the weight and range up to par.
        Cayman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BKdroid
        One interesting piece from the article was that it has a removable battery. If you aren't using it for transportation, you may be able to buy a second battery and double whatever range it has. But who knows how easy it really is to remove or how much a second one would cost.
          jonnybimmer
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cayman
          A removable battery would be amazing. Even if they cost a grand or so, it's not like they're disposable. You would just always have a couple when you go out to ride. You could just reuse them or even offer others to use them in exchange for their drained battery + fee.
      RetrogradE
      • 1 Year Ago
      "the Yamaha disclosed..." Awesome. BTW, what's up with the banana-skin tires on that bike?
      Abhimanyu Yadav
      • 7 Months Ago
      http://www.sagmart.com/models/Yamaha-motor-india

      Interesting, Check Yamaha Models.

      nogas jackass
      • 3 Months Ago

      Ive converted a 94 suzuki gsx-r(was750cc) to 72volt electric for under $5000. I can say from experience im not stuck on stupid with gas anymore.Loud pipes,expensive stinky gas bills,repair bills...no more.Just clean quiet maintenance free riding.Any motorcycle is only dangerous as the person driving it.We are going electric like they were built over 100yrs ago, this time im glad to say they are here to stay. nogas jackass

      Anders Barfod
      • 11 Days Ago

      the 100 km/h limit is pretty pratical... It probably can't do more than 120 km/h anyway and you need at least a minimum of 140 km/h to safely overtake truck on the freeway..  and range limits quickly with speed on an electric.. 

      Electric cars and bikes rule in the city at 60 km/h with no emissions and instant torque of the line.... 

      These electric engines are much more energy efficient than a gasoline engine with all its friction loses and heat.. That heat is though nice to heat the interior of the car at cold temps,, but then you won't want to ride a bike anyways.... 

      jesscott
      • 1 Year Ago
      Drag Pipes save Lives people......silent Motorcycles are deadlier
        Cayman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jesscott
        That's just something people with obnoxious motorcycles say to justify their obnoxious motorcycles. If they were that concerned with safety, they would wear bright orange vests with reflectors and blinking lights on them.
          RoyEMunson
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cayman
          ... or helmets and proper riding gear. The loud pipes nonsense is popular with the squids of the world.
        John B
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jesscott
        Just so long as that one car hears me I megaphone blast up and down my street silencerless at 10,000 rpm for 10 years until the whole block moves away. But what care I? I'm SAFE. Yup!
      Jeff
      • 1 Year Ago
      Okay, first, a bike that does less than 65 MPH is lame. Second, you are silent to other drivers, silent bike = dead.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jeff
        If safety is your concern then drive a car. Don't demand to have an obnoxiously loud vehicle because you choose to drive a motorcycle.
        Paul Scott
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jeff
        I've been riding a Zero for a couple of years in Los Angeles with no problem at all. If you are relying on noise to make you safe, you're an accident waiting to happen. Ride defensively. By the way, my Zero is a rocket and costs practically nothing to ride.
      danfred311
      • 1 Year Ago
      wheel motors. belt or chain drive is conventional thinking. and wrong
        DarylMc
        • 1 Year Ago
        @danfred311
        I agree with Ricardo On an ultra light "sports" bike like this or the off road version a wheel motor does not make a lot of sense. They would have to reinvent the wheel (motor:) to get the weight down do an acceptable level.
        BipDBo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @danfred311
        No.
      Victor Hoyles
      • 1 Year Ago
      What we really need is the 2011 Honda RC-E Electric Superbike to go into production. Now that would get attention in the bike world.
    • Load More Comments