• Oct 7th 2010 at 2:01PM
  • 6
1200 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200 – Click above for high-res image gallery

Rejoice, two-wheel fans: Aprilia has decided to grace the land of the free with the delectable Dorsoduro 1200. According to the moto-obsessed crew over at Hell For Leather, the bike is coming our way next year and we can expect to see it in showrooms as soon as this Spring.

The bike gets underway courtesy of a water-cooled, 1200 cc, 130-horsepower twin-cylinder engine that, according to Aprilia, is a completely new design. With four-valves per cylinder, dual overhead cams and three throttle maps for varying riding conditions, the powerplant sounds like an engineer's wish list.

The whole party comes to a stop courtesy of twin 320 mm floating discs clamped by Brembo four-piston calipers. Throw in the traditional up-right riding position of the supermoto set and you've got a recipe for ridiculously powerful riding perfection. So far, there's no word on how much the Dorsoduro 1200 will set you back, but we're guessing that it won't be long before Aprilia drops the MSRP. Spring is right around the corner, after all.


  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200
  • 2011 Aprilia Dorsoduro 1200

[Source: Hell For Leather]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 6 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Are these types of bikes good for long distance rides?
        • 4 Years Ago
        it'll definitely be a good all-arounder; upright seating, some wind protection (you'd be surprised at what that little screen can do) and relatively cushy/long travel suspension. a full-on sport touring bike would be better for long rides stock-to-stock (i.e. FLR1300, several BMW's, VFR 1200 etc.), but where those bikes carry a lot of heft for maximum touring versatility, a bike like this with some light weight luggage can ride circles around them and the twisty bits. depends what exactly you want to do, there's literally a bike for every occasion nowadays :)

      • 4 Years Ago
      I love Aprillas and I'm excited to see this coming here, but it falls into the same experience that I've had riding other sport-standards.

      That upright riding position may be comfortable, but it denies the full sport riding experience, limiting your weight positioning and (for me) requiring a lot more body movement to get the same results. On the other hand, its minimal fairings, lack of a windscreen, and lack of mountable luggage (for now - go go aftermarket), coupled with that same sit-up-and-beg riding position means it's not the ideal long distance tourer or cruiser either.

      You can't kick back in the seat and throw your feet on highway pegs or forward controls, and you can't lean all the way down and just lay on one arm while you steer with your body like on a sport bike.

      While I'd love one, I just can't see when I'd ride it. If I wanted to go for a fun, fast, or canyon carving ride - I'd take my sportbike. If I wanted to go for a long, cruising type ride, I'd go with an actual cruiser or touring bike. This would just stick me somewhere in between. Can't go as fast and be as involved as I want, can't relax and just cruise as much as I want.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Pretty much exactly that Dan - man way to make that so simple to explain compared to me haha.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ downhill, i agree with most of your logic, but i've always found sport-standards to be more flickable than an equivalent-sized sportbikes thanks to the MX-like leverage from the wide bars. i've owned plenty of sportbikes and have lately spent a lot of time on a friend's SuperDuke 990 (a very neutral seating position despite the aggressive looks) and i'd have to say it's very responsive to inputs and changes direction super quick, almost too quick at first. my personal opinion after years of riding is if i could only have one bike for track, street, some light traveling etc... it'd definitely be a sport-standard. i'm not a cruiser guy, but the few i've ridden turn me off for long trips because of the weight bias on your back side/tail bone, i prefer my weight spread among the bars, pegs and seat more evenly.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I should add again that my experiences are of course from my perspective. We likely weigh differently and are different heights, etc, and have differences in the way we ride :)