• Dec 20, 2008


Since automotive sales are in the toilet and the sour taste of high gas prices still lingers, the unfortunate timing of General Motors' long-awaited Chevy Camaro has the armchair quarterbacks fervently debating its long-term viability. This, despite the fact that upon its release the Camaro will offer a little something for almost everyone throughout its various trim levels, a courageous attempt by GM to boost the iconic car's sales. However, many devoted Camaro enthusiasts will still be left out in the cold. This in part due to the vehicle's starting price as well as the many additional luxuries that drag down the Camaro's power-to-weight ratio. No one wants to pay MSRP for a vehicle they intend to strip. That's why GM Performance Parts will be offering a 2010 Chevrolet Camaro body in white. As a result, budget Camaro racers won't have to wait 10 years for a discounted used chassis and large race teams won't necessarily break the bank building a replacement when the driver inevitably stuffs the wall.

The Camaro BIW package will be a full body assembly structure available through GM Peformance Parts for $7,000 beginning in the first quarter of 2009. The chassis will not contain a VIN number, so there will be no means for street registration, as the body in white is reserved for race teams only. An application must be submitted to GM Performance Parts for approval before any transaction occurs. Follow the jump to see the press release in full.




PRESS RELEASE:

RACERS REJOICE! GM PERFORMANCE PARTS TO OFFER NEW CAMARO BODIES IN WHITE


Grand Blanc, Mich. – Racers who want to slip into something more fashionable at the track next year will find the 2010 Camaro is just their size. GM Performance Parts will offer body in white packages of the new Camaro starting in the first quarter of 2009.

The basic package lists for $7,000 and includes an assembled body structure, including the front fenders, hood, front valance/grille header panel, roof, doors, rear quarters, trunk lid and rear valance. The structure also includes the complete floorpans and chassis rails.

Racer must fill out an online application to be eligible to purchase one. The form is available at www.gmperformanceparts.com. Bodies will be sold on a first-come, first-serve basis. There is no limit to the number an approved racing team can purchase.

"This is the easiest and most cost-effective way to build a race-ready new Camaro," said Dr. Jamie Meyer, of GM Performance Parts. "We envision racers using these bodies for all types of competition, from Pro Street and Competition drag racing to road racing."

The body in white includes only a painted body shell and no additional components or materials. The bodies do not have vehicle identification numbers, so they may only be used as racing vehicles that will never be licensed for street driving.

Racers will add powertrain, fuel system, suspension, interior components and glass (or sanctioning body-approved alternative), and safety equipment, then go racing.

"For the racers who would strip down the entire car and replace most of the components with racing-spec parts, the body in white saves time and money," said Dr. Meyer. "Drag racers, for example, won't have to worry about swapping out for a solid axle – they can just bolt one up and go."

The body in white's unadorned interior also saves time and money by allowing racing teams to eliminate the process of stripping a fully equipment production car in order to reduce weight and prep the chassis for a roll cage.

And when it comes to building up the body in white, GM Performance Parts offers crate engines, engine controllers, high-performance transmissions and hundreds of other parts to help complete the project – including dedicated drag racing engines and engine suited for circle track and road racing competition.

GM Performance Parts – Tested to the Limits, Backed by GM

GM Performance Parts crate engines undergo a 50-hour, full-throttle engine dynamometer validation; requiring that the engines perform from peak horsepower to peak torque. And if that's not enough, GMPP installs crate engines in its own engineering vehicles for ongoing testing and continuous improvement. It's that commitment to quality and durability that allows General Motors to back GM Performance Parts crate engines with a 24 month / 50,000 mile warranty (whichever occurs first). All GM Performance Parts components carry a 12 months / 12,000 miles warranty.

Enthusiasts who crave the latest technology, maximum horsepower and the expertise and confidence backed by GM, can purchase GMPP crate engines, blocks, heads, high performance transmissions and components, from GMPP Authorized Center dealers or any other GM dealership nationwide. For more information or to locate the closest GM dealership visit www.gmperformanceparts.com.

[Source: GM Performance Parts]


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  • 22 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      Can someone explain this to me? I'm kind of lost...

      What do you get for your 7k?
        • 6 Years Ago
        Thanks, guys.
        • 6 Years Ago
        so just that is 7 grand
        seems a little steep
        is it aluminum?
      • 6 Years Ago
      You should be able to order it with an optional VIN, so that if you want to make a custom street machine, using aftermarket parts, you can. If I remember correctly, you can do that now with old Challenger's and Camaro's, in terms of Kit's, but it would be good to see a real deal "Kit Camaro Beast".
        • 6 Years Ago
        Kind of impossible for Chevy to say a car meets current regulations when they didn't build it.
        • 6 Years Ago
        They won't provide a vin because some people would start stealing complete cars for parts to finish the job. This is not a problem with track cars because they use non-standard parts.

      • 6 Years Ago
      YES! Now I can complete my fantasy of a 2JZGTE-powered Camaro to complement my RB26DETT-powered Mustang!

      Just kidding.

      I'd definitely build a modern-day Sunoco Camaro with that if I could.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Gee, No VIN. Consider the company in Ohio converting Saturn Skys into EV (electric vehicles). Pretty cool concept, but $30,000 for the gas vehicle, only to be stripped for the EV. The EV then adds another $20,000 or so. GM ought to be working on selling these types of "stripped" vehicles (OK, maybe a bit less stripped...) for companies (and individuals) to put GM vehicles into every market they can. (If not EVs, then street rods, drifters, canyon carvers, etc.) What a better way to help determine where the green car market is going than to help the green little guys with big ideas who can do all the hard work - GM gets a product sold, a recognized nameplate on the street, and gets the benefit of seeing what the new auto entrepreneurs can do. This could be a new market segment for GM. Helping the racers is great - GM should go the next step. This would be a great platform for an EV.
      • 6 Years Ago

      Looks like Chevy is becoming more of an sporty division than Pontiac.
      • 6 Years Ago
      This is uber cool!!!
      • 6 Years Ago
      First the LNF turbo upgrade kit for only $650 and now this?

      WTF is going on at GM? All of a sudden they seem to have PASSION about cars. What ever they are smoking, I hope they get addicted to it...
      • 6 Years Ago
      The Camaro competes directly with the Mustang (for which there is already a significant racing industry).

      A Corvette body would cost a lot more than $7000. And the repair costs would be much greater, particularly for the aluminum frame (ZR1).

      (this message in reply to #6)
      • 6 Years Ago
      7 grand is pretty good, even if its just a Camaro. A mustang BIW costs $10-15k from the catalogue.

      Of course the BIW for the mustang has two sportscar championships under its belt.
      • 6 Years Ago
      On behalf of all racers out there, thank you GM. Even if your not planning on going racing with the new Camaro, this is good news. It's such a smart move and I wish all manufactures would do this. See, they are capable of making smart moves and decisions.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Whats so special about the camaro? Why not have the corvette or even the solstice frame available to racers? They're more suited for racing than a unibody frame.
      • 6 Years Ago
      The Camaro competes directly with the Mustang (for which there is already a significant racing industry).

      A Corvette body would cost a lot more than $7000. And the repair costs would be much greater, particularly for the aluminum frame (ZR1).
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