2016 Nissan Altima

MSRP

$22,500 - $32,690
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EngineEngine 2.5LI-4
MPGMPG 27 City / 39 Hwy
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2016 Altima Overview

Here's a theory: the midsize sedan is no longer a family car. Oh sure, it can still easily be pressed into service for child-hauling duty, and it still excels in this regard, but its main duties have largely been taken over by the increasingly popular crossover. So while some midsize sedans stick to their roots, offering relatively innocuous designs and traditional V6 engines, other vehicles have taken on more fashion-forward designs that occasionally sacrifice versatility in favor of good looks. The Toyota Camry still plays in the former, stalwart category, but look at the Mazda6, Ford Fusion, or Chrysler 200 – they're pretty cars, focused less on mainstream appeal. Combined with class-above options and more advanced engines and transmissions, those sexier vehicles represent the new midsize sedan, which sort of serves as a more humble, grounded lifestyle vehicle. For 2016, the Nissan Altima is trying to evolve. After a brief spin around metro Detroit in the facelifted model, it's clear the transition is underway but won't be complete until an all-new Altima arrives. The V-Motion grille is narrower and more aggressive, and the headlights will feel familiar to anyone who likes the new Maxima. The most obvious change for this facelift is the rather dramatic adoption of Nissan's Energetic Flow design language. Unlike the facelifted Volkswagen Passat we tested a couple weeks back, you'll have no trouble telling the difference between 2015 and 2016 Altimas. The V-Motion grille is narrower and more aggressive, and the headlights will feel familiar to anyone who likes the new Maxima. Like its big brother, the Altima's new headlights integrate both the turn signals and LED running lamps, which draw further attention to the grille. Nissan also added a more sculpted, domed hood for 2016. Nissan brought a clean-sheet design to the back of the Altima. The new taillights are strikingly similar to other Nissan sedans – Maxima and Sentra – and look sharp. The rear bumper is also new, and looks best in the SR trim seen here. Opting for the SR will score you 18-inch wheels, dark chrome headlights, a rear spoiler, and front foglights. The interior gets a leather-wrapped steering wheel and gear lever, although more functional changes, like more heavily bolstered seats, are absent. The Altima SR slots in between the S and SV model with the 2.5-liter four-cylinder, but it can be had with a more powerful, 3.5-liter V6. At 39 mpg, the Altima boasts best-in-class highway fuel economy. The 2.5-liter Altima SR will only account for about 20 percent of sales, says Nissan. The four-cylinder engine has been tweaked ever so slightly, seeing a small increase in its compression ratio, from 10 to 10.3. There's also a new anodized coating on the piston heads, which, when taken with some impressive aerodynamic aids – active grille shutters, a more aerodynamic underbody cover, and the actual body tweaks – blesses this particular Nissan with best-in-class highway fuel economy, at 39 miles per gallon. The 2.5 is tied with the CVT-equipped Honda …
Full Review

2016 Altima Overview

Here's a theory: the midsize sedan is no longer a family car. Oh sure, it can still easily be pressed into service for child-hauling duty, and it still excels in this regard, but its main duties have largely been taken over by the increasingly popular crossover. So while some midsize sedans stick to their roots, offering relatively innocuous designs and traditional V6 engines, other vehicles have taken on more fashion-forward designs that occasionally sacrifice versatility in favor of good looks. The Toyota Camry still plays in the former, stalwart category, but look at the Mazda6, Ford Fusion, or Chrysler 200 – they're pretty cars, focused less on mainstream appeal. Combined with class-above options and more advanced engines and transmissions, those sexier vehicles represent the new midsize sedan, which sort of serves as a more humble, grounded lifestyle vehicle. For 2016, the Nissan Altima is trying to evolve. After a brief spin around metro Detroit in the facelifted model, it's clear the transition is underway but won't be complete until an all-new Altima arrives. The V-Motion grille is narrower and more aggressive, and the headlights will feel familiar to anyone who likes the new Maxima. The most obvious change for this facelift is the rather dramatic adoption of Nissan's Energetic Flow design language. Unlike the facelifted Volkswagen Passat we tested a couple weeks back, you'll have no trouble telling the difference between 2015 and 2016 Altimas. The V-Motion grille is narrower and more aggressive, and the headlights will feel familiar to anyone who likes the new Maxima. Like its big brother, the Altima's new headlights integrate both the turn signals and LED running lamps, which draw further attention to the grille. Nissan also added a more sculpted, domed hood for 2016. Nissan brought a clean-sheet design to the back of the Altima. The new taillights are strikingly similar to other Nissan sedans – Maxima and Sentra – and look sharp. The rear bumper is also new, and looks best in the SR trim seen here. Opting for the SR will score you 18-inch wheels, dark chrome headlights, a rear spoiler, and front foglights. The interior gets a leather-wrapped steering wheel and gear lever, although more functional changes, like more heavily bolstered seats, are absent. The Altima SR slots in between the S and SV model with the 2.5-liter four-cylinder, but it can be had with a more powerful, 3.5-liter V6. At 39 mpg, the Altima boasts best-in-class highway fuel economy. The 2.5-liter Altima SR will only account for about 20 percent of sales, says Nissan. The four-cylinder engine has been tweaked ever so slightly, seeing a small increase in its compression ratio, from 10 to 10.3. There's also a new anodized coating on the piston heads, which, when taken with some impressive aerodynamic aids – active grille shutters, a more aerodynamic underbody cover, and the actual body tweaks – blesses this particular Nissan with best-in-class highway fuel economy, at 39 miles per gallon. The 2.5 is tied with the CVT-equipped Honda …Hide Full Review