Related Articles Related Articles

This is one of those fun stories where we could have gotten by without writing a single sentence, just by running the video and the headline. That title really does say everything that needs to be said – this is a video – a highly stylized, beautifully filmed video - from McLaren of its attempt at breaking the seven-minute barrier at the Nürburgring Nordschleife with its new P1 hybrid hyper car.

We've had several chances to get up close and personal with the McLaren P1 since its debut back in September at the Paris Motor Show, but McLaren has literally kept us in the dark about the car's interior thanks to a heavy tint covering all of its windows. With the company preparing the car for its production debut next month at the Geneva Motor Show, we're finally getting our first look inside the car courtesy of a few official images.

It was back in 1963 that 26-year-old Bruce McLaren founded Bruce McLaren Motor Racing Ltd. in London with no more than a handful of dedicated employees. Today, nearly fifty years later, the McLaren Group employs more than 2,000 and is credited with developing, manufacturing and racing some of the world's greatest supercars on a global stage.

McLaren invited us to private showing of its near production-ready P1 supercar in Beverly Hills last night, offering its affluent customers a sneak peek at what promises to be one of the finest - if not the best - sports car in the world when it arrives later this year. While the development team continues to hold many of the coupe's cards close to its chest, a trickle of details emerged that only served to further whet our appetite for the upcoming exotic.

McLaren gathered people of the very important variety in New York City to get an up-close look at it P1 supercar, and to explain how the production car will diverge from the P1 concept shown at the Paris Motor Show. During the show the P1 was said to be "97-percent final," and during the NYC shindig the last three-percent variation was explained, that being vents in the fenders ahead of the front wheels to channel hot air away, and a different pattern for the mesh grille at the rear of the car.