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There's no shame in not knowing what a limited slip differential is. After all, every budding car guy has a first time trying to parse Brian Beckman's The Physics of Racing. (And many of us still don't understand the entirety of it after multiple perusals.)

Jay Leno has finally gotten around to getting his hands on the Scion FR-S. The latest episode of Jay Leno's Garage is all about the new low-buck sports car from Toyota. Jack Hollis, the vice president and General Manager of Scion, stops in to give the TV personality a full walk-around of the 200-horsepower coupe. While Leno's collection includes every shade of high-horsepower machinery, the comedian is also a fan of cheap driving fun for the masses. Hollis hits the high points of the model's dev

With an epic chassis and the lowest center of gravity in the business, there's plenty for enthusiast to love about the Scion FR-S. Except, that is, for those who prefer to take their nimble, affordable sports cars with the roof down. Their choices are rather limited in this price category to the Mazda MX-5 and Ford Mustang, but if the latest reports prove accurate, the FR-S – which is, of course, virtually identical to the Subaru BRZ and sold overseas as the Toyota GT 86 – is prepari

The 2013 Scion FR-S doesn't have the kind of power that results in jaw-dropping dyno numbers, but any naturally aspirated 2.0-liter four cylinder that promises 200 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque needs to be vetted out.

Well, that didn't take long. The First Toyota FT-86 (a.k.a. Scion FR-S) has made its way to the dyno courtesy of the good people at HKS. How'd it do? The vehicle managed to spin the rollers at 170 rear-wheel horsepower, which dovetails with the 200 crank horsepower announced by Toyota and Subaru after calculating a 15-percent driveline loss. Of course, whenever HKS gets involved, you can feel safe betting your lunch money that forced induction won't be far behind. True to form, HKS showed off i

The Scion FR-S may not be big on power, but Toyota and Subaru engineers have delivered a lightweight, rear-drive coupe at what should be a palatable price point. That sounds like a recipe for track day fun if you ask us, or you can watch the post-jump video for visual evidence.

According to our recent and completely unscientific poll, the majority of our readership prefers the Subaru BRZ to its kissing cousin, the Toyota GT 86. Just about half of those who clicked an opinion on our poll sided with the Subie, while the remainder were split – a quarter went with the Toyota and a quarter said the two cars were so similar that it didn't matter.

With the introduction tonight of the 2013 Scion FR-S, the triumvirate of oh-so-similar sport coupes born of the joint venture between Toyota and Subaru is complete. The FR-S is what we Americans will get from the Scion brand, as opposed to the Toyota GT 86 that Europeans get and the Subaru-branded BRZ.