• Apr 14, 2010
If Bill Ford, Jr. has his way, he'll never be behind the controls of the Ford Motor Company ever again. It's not that the former CEO loathes the idea of holding the reigns to one of the biggest car manufacturers on the planet, notes Automotive News, it's just that he'd rather spend his time focusing on the company's future than dealing with day-to-to-day concerns.

So who's going to take the tiller when current head-honcho Alan Mulally steps out for good? It's anyone's guess at this point, though Ford believes that the company now has a strong enough management structure to pull a candidate from within. Mulally, who's currently 64 years-old, took over as CEO back in 2006, and there has been some speculation as to how long the man will stay in charge.

One thing's for sure though, odds are whoever jumps in the saddle at the Blue Oval after Mulally likely won't be of the Ford bloodline.

[Source: Automotive News | Image: Bill Pugliano/Getty]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 28 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      2nd
      • 4 Years Ago
      Quote: ""Selfless??????This guy ruined the company""


      Absolutely false. Bill Ford made a lot of good decisions, first and foremost was to step down and let another (Mulally) take his place.

      He also wanted a much expanded hybrid program well before they became popular, and started Ford's shift away from large SUV's.
      • 4 Years Ago
      They sell Volvo to China.
      Brainless? Yes.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Mulally should just stay there for a long, long time...worry about his successor later
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm selling all of my stock as soon as Mulally leaves. An internal person will be a bad idea, especially if they were there before Mulally, because most likely they were part of the problem to begin with.

      It will be a sad day when he leaves...
      • 4 Years Ago
      That pic looks seriously photoshopped to me. Neither head fits on it's body.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Hope Alan will stay on for another ten years at least.
      • 4 Years Ago
      If all CEOs of companies can be this selfless.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Selfless??????This guy ruined the company, the reason he will not be a CEO again is because he doesn't want to lose any more money and i am sure his family member will make sure that he is not CEO again.

        But i am sure Ford will try and fix those Detroit Lions.
        • 4 Years Ago
        He's referring to Ford, Jr.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ruined the company? I don't know, Ford has made a pretty spectacular recovery without the need for any extra "bailout" money. That sort of thing is impossible without good leadership - as we saw from Chrysler and GM.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Don't go! There is still so much left to do, especially within Lincoln and Mercury.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Does Bill not have any kids?
        • 4 Years Ago
        He's probably thinking that since Ford is still at least partially family owned, one of Bill Ford, Jr's kids could step in as an exec at the company.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Why do you ask?
      Carlos
      • 4 Years Ago
      When has promoting an internal suit ever been a good idea? Never is the answer. There is still too much deep rooted politics in Ford for them to do that. Its always a good idea to bring in new blood.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        @Jake Jack Welch is someone who comes along very, very rarely. The same as Mullaly at Boeing. He was an engineer that was promoted from within, and eventually took over the entire 777 program, then later, Boeing itself. These people don't come along often, and when they do, they're sought after strongly by other companies.

        So while it's easy to say that the best companies promote from within, it's very rare that the best talent reaches the top in the company they started in. They've usually moved from company to company a few times, jumping rungs in the corporate ladder each time.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        Tell that to GE who promoted Jack Welch from within and became incredibly successful under his leadership.

        The best long-term companies groom talent within and promote from within. Desparate companies with a poor culture look outside.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        I think that good companies like GE develop people like Jack Welch from within. When Jack Welch stepped down, he was replaced with another GE guy that was developed from within. I think that a good company developes executives who are steeped in the corporate culture and rise to the top. I don't thing that GE is an exception, I think that many top companies do this if they're run smartly.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        Frist off, getting a hired gun from outside usually only serves to help the company short term. Most of these vultures only care about raising stock price long enough to cash in for themselves. They typically don't have any care for the long term viability of the company.

        Promoting from within, if possible, is the best way. Sure there's some politics of the people that they've worked with or for in the past but at least they are dedicated to the company and have some form of dedication to the company and not just their pocketbook.

        Mullaly seems to be the exception. Probably because he grew up as a dedicated Boeing employee and resumed that style at Ford. I'm not saying that a company always has a good CEO on deck but if they do, there's no reason not to make it happen.

        I'd expect Mark Fields to be the guy they're talking about here. He and Bill Ford started alot of the stuff that Mulally continued upon when they were down and nearly out in the mid '00s. He's also stayed at the top and not been moved around, this would make me think that Mulally likes him and thinks he's got the right attitude. They retired alot of execs that didn't. That's my guess anyway.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I hope the two of them stay at the top for another 5 or 6 years minimum. The Ford brand seems to be on the upswing, but there is much to do over at Lincoln and Mercury. If they can somehow get all three brands settled into their respective niche, then I'll feel ok with Mulally retiring.
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