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The wacky, three-wheeled Toyota i-Road we saw in Geneva earlier this year will be heading to production. But before you run down to your local Toyota dealer looking for one of these all-electric "personal mobility" vehicles, chances are, you'll never actually see one unless you visit Japan.

Toyota is adding its funky, "active leaning" i-Road electric concept vehicle to its rather utopian people-moving experiment in Toyota City that combines personal and public transportation sources. Announced last year, Toyota's "Ha:mo" (short for "harmonious mobility") urban transportation trial lets people get through town using a combination of shared electric vehicles and other transportation sources. Traffic-routing technology and smartphone communication are all part of the futuristic effort

We're not sure if you can throw tire chains on the super-narrow Toyota i-Road electric vehicle, but it's a question worth asking. That's because the Japanese automaker is partnering with the French city of Grenoble, located in the Alps, to deploy a car-sharing program that will include about 70 Toyota EVs, including some based on the recently unveiled i-Road concept.

This video might rank up there with Katrina & The Waves' "Walking On Sunshine" when it comes to putting the viewer in a good mood. Toyota does the honors by showing off a quartet of its all-electric i-Road concept vehicles literally sashaying through what appears to be a French seaside town in glorious digital effect style.

The new Toyota i-Road concept moves in mysterious ways. So mysterious, in fact, that Toyota provided hourly driving demonstrations at its booth at the Geneva Motor Show. The quirky three-wheeler whirled around on a sort of road, the rear wheel looking for all the world like it was losing its grip around the corners – but it didn't. The movement of the all-electric two-seater caught the attention of the international automotive media representatives, often quite jaded at shows like these, a

We've seen plenty of three-wheeled creations in our day, but none quite like the Toyota i-Road Concept. The "personal mobility vehicle" offers seating for two with driver and passenger positioned in a tandem position. While that may sound more like a motorcycle than a car, the closed cockpit means riders don't need a helmet. The design also takes a page from the 2008 Peugeot HyMotion3 Concept with an articulating front suspension that allows the driver to lean through corners thanks to "Active L