2019 Honda Passport

2019 Passport Photos
 Editors' Pick
Autoblog Rating
7.5

The new Passport takes everything we love about the Pilot — a comfortable ride, a strong engine and a hugely functional interior — and wraps it in a shorter, slightly sportier package. Our big knocks are tech and a someone sedate driving experience.

Industry
8.5
SOUTH HAVEN, Mich. — The 2019 Honda Passport is aimed squarely at someone like me. I turned 30 the weekend I had the Honda, and we decided to go camping in western Michigan to celebrate. Like any millennial couple pulled from an advertising department’s demographics, we don’t have kids but we do have a couple of dogs. After a weekend away, we say that Honda nailed it. The Passport isn’t perfect, but it might be perfect for my family. And it might just replace our old CR-V when the time comes. Autoblog has already spent a good bit of time in the 2019 Passport, which is essentially a two-row Honda Pilot with a slightly sportier demeanor – off-roading in Moab, and later on a long road trip through Oregon. As West Coast Editor James Riswick put it, the Passport is an exercise in design, taking a competent but bland crossover and transforming it into a sharp SUV with some real presence. All it takes is a few tweaks, the most notable of which are the 6.2 inches cut out of the Pilot’s rear and the 0.8-inch increase in ride height. It’s handsome, though the Passport is still not nearly as tough-looking as a Toyota 4Runner or Jeep Wrangler. That said, the interior is a far more comfortable place to be than either of those vehicles. Honda does interior packaging better than nearly anyone, and so the Passport is clean and hugely functional, with tons of pockets in the doors and a huge bin in the center console. The missing third row means there’s a large storage area under the rear floor, making up for much of the lost cargo area versus the Pilot. We packed enough for a weekend, but the Passport could have swallowed a month’s worth of our gear. The rear is wide enough for a dog bed so they can relax in the shade while we camp. My only real complaint about the interior is that the cupholders aren’t large enough to pass the Nalgene test, a strange oversight for a vehicle aimed at adventure seekers. Not that our weekend away at The Fields of Michigan could be called adventurous. Located on a blueberry farm, our tent was nicer than most cabins, with toilets and showers behind a wall. We had power outlets (I had originally planned to use one of the multiple outlets in the Passport) to charge our phones and decent cell service the entire time. We parked near our tent and spent the evening drinking wine, eating pie and making s'mores with the proprietor and other fellow glampers. If we hadn’t already tackled Moab, I’d feel I was doing the Passport a bit of a disservice.   But the thing is, the Passport is made for weekends like this. The roads to the farm were dirt and gravel, with bits where the extra ground clearance helped, but it wasn’t remotely challenging. I just wanted to pack a bunch of stuff in the rear, including my …
Full Review
SOUTH HAVEN, Mich. — The 2019 Honda Passport is aimed squarely at someone like me. I turned 30 the weekend I had the Honda, and we decided to go camping in western Michigan to celebrate. Like any millennial couple pulled from an advertising department’s demographics, we don’t have kids but we do have a couple of dogs. After a weekend away, we say that Honda nailed it. The Passport isn’t perfect, but it might be perfect for my family. And it might just replace our old CR-V when the time comes. Autoblog has already spent a good bit of time in the 2019 Passport, which is essentially a two-row Honda Pilot with a slightly sportier demeanor – off-roading in Moab, and later on a long road trip through Oregon. As West Coast Editor James Riswick put it, the Passport is an exercise in design, taking a competent but bland crossover and transforming it into a sharp SUV with some real presence. All it takes is a few tweaks, the most notable of which are the 6.2 inches cut out of the Pilot’s rear and the 0.8-inch increase in ride height. It’s handsome, though the Passport is still not nearly as tough-looking as a Toyota 4Runner or Jeep Wrangler. That said, the interior is a far more comfortable place to be than either of those vehicles. Honda does interior packaging better than nearly anyone, and so the Passport is clean and hugely functional, with tons of pockets in the doors and a huge bin in the center console. The missing third row means there’s a large storage area under the rear floor, making up for much of the lost cargo area versus the Pilot. We packed enough for a weekend, but the Passport could have swallowed a month’s worth of our gear. The rear is wide enough for a dog bed so they can relax in the shade while we camp. My only real complaint about the interior is that the cupholders aren’t large enough to pass the Nalgene test, a strange oversight for a vehicle aimed at adventure seekers. Not that our weekend away at The Fields of Michigan could be called adventurous. Located on a blueberry farm, our tent was nicer than most cabins, with toilets and showers behind a wall. We had power outlets (I had originally planned to use one of the multiple outlets in the Passport) to charge our phones and decent cell service the entire time. We parked near our tent and spent the evening drinking wine, eating pie and making s'mores with the proprietor and other fellow glampers. If we hadn’t already tackled Moab, I’d feel I was doing the Passport a bit of a disservice.   But the thing is, the Passport is made for weekends like this. The roads to the farm were dirt and gravel, with bits where the extra ground clearance helped, but it wasn’t remotely challenging. I just wanted to pack a bunch of stuff in the rear, including my …
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Retail Price

$31,990 - $43,680 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$3,733 - $5,318 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 3.5L V-6
MPG 20 City / 25 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 9-spd auto w/OD
Power 280 @ 6000 rpm
Drivetrain front-wheel
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