• Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz
  • The aluminum roof panel of the 2015 C-Class, affixed to a cutaway portion of the bodyshell.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • There's a gap between the roof panel and the steel body --
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • because in the Tuscaloosa, Alabama plant, the bodyshell is rotated 360 degrees during painting. The roof panel is attached to the body with screws and 10-millimeter spacers, so the steel and aluminum , which expand at different rates, can cure together after painting. Once dried, the roof is affixed to the body with adhesive. Other factories that don't rotate the body use tabs on the roof panel to secure it to the body.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • An overhead shot of the multi-part steel construction of the rear axle transverse beam in the current C-Class, upper left, and the single aluminum piece used in the 2015 C-Class. On the lower right is a section of bodywork with different colors highlighting the various metals used in construction.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • The pieces of the steel rear axle transverse beam.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • The single-piece aluminum rear axle transverse beam, six pounds lighter than its steel counterpart.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • The steel construction of the front damper strut assembly in the current C-Class --
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • The single-piece aluminum strut tower assembly in the 2015 C-Class.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • Impact fasteners are used to connect some aluminum components to the bodyshell were there is enough metal to do so.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • This is part of the rear wheel-well assembly. The impact fasteners are the row of red circles in the lower center of th photo.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • The other side of the impact fasteners.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • A panel showing the placement of cameras and sensors around the car that enable Intelligent Drive.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • A panel showing the global crash tests the 2015 C-Class has been engineered to pass. Yes, the small-offset frontal impact test is pictured, but Mercedes engineers told us that the full-frontal test is actually the hardest to engineer the car around.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • The Intelligent Drive simulator using an S-Class placed in front of six screens.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • An A-Class finish being tested on a rolling road under different temperature conditions.
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • Image Credit: AOL
  • An S-Class also being temperature tested on another rolling road.
  • Image Credit: AOL
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