• South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak (C) dirves Hyundai's first full-speed electric vehicle, BlueOn, during an unveiling ceremony at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on September 9m 2010. Hyundai Motor unveiled South Korea's first full-speed electric car, designed to tap into the increasingly competitive electric auto market, hailed as the industry's future. REPUBLIC OF KOREA OUT AFP PHOTO/DONG-A ILBO (Photo credit: DONG-A ILBO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • South Korean President Lee Myung-bak test dirves Hyundai's electric vehicle, BlueOn, in the compound of the presidential house in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010. Hyundai Motor unveiled its first electric car Thursday as it moves to catch up with Japanese rivals that have jumped ahead in the field. (Photo credit: AP Photo/Yonhap, Chun Soo-young)
  • South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak (2nd R) listens to an introduction about Hyundai's first full-speed electric vehicle, BlueOn, during an unveiling ceremony at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on September 9m 2010. Hyundai Motor unveiled South Korea's first full-speed electric car, designed to tap into the increasingly competitive electric auto market, hailed as the industry's future. (Photo credit: DONG-A ILBO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak (C) listens to an introduction about Hyundai's first full-speed electric vehicle, BlueOn, during an unveiling ceremony at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on September 9m 2010. Hyundai Motor unveiled South Korea's first full-speed electric car, designed to tap into the increasingly competitive electric auto market, hailed as the industry's future. (Photo credit: DONG-A ILBO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak (R) looks at Hyundai's first full-speed electric vehicle, BlueOn, during an unveiling ceremony at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on September 9m 2010. Hyundai Motor unveiled South Korea's first full-speed electric car, designed to tap into the increasingly competitive electric auto market, hailed as the industry's future. (Photo credit: DONG-A ILBO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak (2nd L) listens to an introduction about Hyundai's first full-speed electric vehicle, BlueOn, during an unveiling ceremony at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on September 9m 2010. Hyundai Motor unveiled South Korea's first full-speed electric car, designed to tap into the increasingly competitive electric auto market, hailed as the industry's future. (Photo credit: DONG-A ILBO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak dirves Hyundai's first full-speed electric vehicle, BlueOn, during an unveiling ceremony at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on September 9m 2010. Hyundai Motor unveiled South Korea's first full-speed electric car, designed to tap into the increasingly competitive electric auto market, hailed as the industry's future. (Photo credit: DONG-A ILBO/AFP/Getty Images)

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