If BMW's new i sub-brand sounds more like it belongs to consumer electronics than it does to automobiles, that's probably no mistake. After all, electric vehicles bridge the gap between conventional automobile and electronic gadget – just ask our compatriots over at Engadget that report on them all the time. But to drive the point home even greener, BMW has, together with the new i3, launched a new collection of electronics accessories that make the Bavarian automaker as much a competitor with companies like Belkin or Griffin as it is with Audi or Mercedes-Benz.

The new BMW i Collection includes items like a solar charger for phones and MP3 players, a laptop bag made from felt-like recycled PET plastic and vegetable-tanned leather, and of course the requisite USB dongle. Other items include keyfobs, a shopping bag, notebook and ballpoint pen.

All the items, of course, are designed to extend the i3's upscale tree-hugging image to items you can hold and use while your EV is charging in the driveway. They go on sale starting next month with prices ranging from 15 euros ($20) for the pen or lanyard to 99 euros ($135) for the shopping bag. Details in the press release below and images of the whole collection in the gallery above.
Show full PR text
Accessories that make a sustainable impression. The BMW i Collection.
19.09.2013

Munich. Take a look at what we refer to as the i-edition of the new BMW Lifestyle Collection: the BMW i Collection. Its accessories, which will be launched in October 2013, are characterized by clear design and the responsible handling of resources. The BMW i Collection is inspired by the ideas behind the BMW i-concept. If it applies to the vehicles, then it goes for the lifestyle products too – Solar Charger, Urban Mega Shopper or Laptop Bag: all of them are visionary and ecofriendly, urban and premium, everyday and elegant.

Materials: sustainable & modern.
Leather tanned using olive leaves and a felt-look fabric made from recycled PET – those are the exciting materials from which the BMW i Urban Mega Shopper is made. This bag has blue chord handles – also made from recycled PET – and it bears the signature of BMW i. The Shopper's spacious main compartment can accommodate a matching BMW i Laptop Bag, whose strong sleeve protects your computer on the move. In one of the Shopper's secondary compartments you can stash your BMW i Ballpoint Pen, a writing implement which the BMW i Collection's developers made ecofriendly, just like the BMW i Notebook. The latter has a two-tone cover made from recycled felt-look fabric, which can be changed easily using its inner loops.

Use it: daily, everywhere.
The BMW i Solar Charger lets you charge, store and dispense energy. This upmarket solar device in a BMW i logo design may be very compact, but it has a big charging surface and harbors an integrated rechargeable battery. It comes with a charging cable that has a range of different slot-on connectors, allowing you to charge mobile devices and MP3 players without burdening resources. If you need faster charging from time to time, then a USB port lets you supply the unit's battery with power without a light source – from a laptop for example.

The BMW i USB Stick helps you transfer data on the move and holds 16 gigabytes inside its matt, aluminum-look body, which features an "electric-blue" BMW i logo. Thanks to its integrated ring it can be attached securely to the BMW i Lanyard so that it's always at hand. The Lanyard consists of a blue chord made from recycled PET and a plant-tanned leather label. But if you prefer not to carry your keys on a lanyard, then BMW i Edition offers you a BMW i Keyfob instead.

The BMW i Collection is available at selected retailers and online at www.bmw-shop.de from October 2013 onwards. Prices range from €99 (Shopper), to €39 (Solar Charger), to €15 (Ballpoint Pen, Lanyard).


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 19 Comments
      Marco Polo
      • 1 Year Ago
      All prestige brands market as many accessories a possible to help offset the expensive image adverting and reinforce the brand's image as a 'lifestyle' choice. I can understand the negative reaction by ardent 'green' supporters who have long regarded concern for the environment, as their personal little club with a anti-consumer, anti-business, leftist philosophy. That would be ok, but these puritanical eco-pests, alienate the vast majority of people whose support is essential for any environmental cause to succeed.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Well they could reduce the "the expensive image adverting" instead of selling exploitive products.
          Marco Polo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          @ Spec I can see you have a real flair for merchandising !
      Ryan
      • 1 Year Ago
      I hate it when noble causes (protecting the environment) are preyed upon by corporations to make a buck.
        imag
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ryan
        Why are people voting you down for this? It's true.
        transam
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ryan
        Youre right. I know of some stores that are charging 5 cents for plastic bags because they say less plastic bags help the environment. Really? They figured out a new way of making money on something that they previously gave away for free. Sad.
      noevfud
      • 1 Year Ago
      Such great posting ABG. Nothing real to write about?
      Snark McGee
      • 1 Year Ago
      nothing says "green" like consumption.
      Gregg Alley
      • 1 Year Ago
      If the profits aren't going to environmental causes, what's the point?
      RC
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why take it to the extreme? Isn't it possible to be environmentally aware without becoming a tree huger? Sometimes it feels like it is all a joke to them. I don't care about this stupid collection. I care about more EVs on the road and better air quality.
      imag
      • 1 Year Ago
      The downvotes to the comments are absurd. I have worked in solar for the last 12 years - there is nothing "green" about these products. A solar panel on your roof will pay back the energy it took to make it in a couple years, depending on your irradiance. A solar charger will NOT pay back the energy it took to make it unless you use it every single day for a decade or more (it will probably break before then, even if you tried). Something does not suddenly become "green" because you add solar - you need to actually use that solar to offset dirty energy, and in this case, you are unlikely to pull more than a kWh or two from a charger over its lifetime.
        noevfud
        • 1 Year Ago
        @imag
        Looks like BMW employees or marketing affiliates sent a "tip" to ABG, they posted this marketing press release and now the same folks are voting down every comment that calls out the nonsense of these overpriced, non-green products. The only thing these products do is make BMW fans feel better and lighter in the wallet. Yes, the net result of the solar charger is a negative number as mentioned before.
        Marco Polo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @imag
        @ imag Solar power is a technology, not a religion ! There is no 'correct' way to use solar power, the consumer buys the technology to suit their needs or wants, and that all there is to it ! It's their lives, their money, and their consumer choice. Not every single aspect of 'green' technology has to conform to a humourless, strict, ideologically 'pure' agenda.
          imag
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Marco Polo
          The point is, Marco, that the environmental impact of a solar panel depends on how it is deployed. If someone wants to buy a solar powered charger because it is useful, I have no problem with it. But marketing departments shouldn't pretend they help the environment any more than any other trinket. The point is that this stuff is being sold as green, and, unless someone is going to buy any of this *instead* of something else, then they are actually doing more harm than good. And I don't know where you get the bit about religion or ideology. We all have lots of products that don't help the environment, me included. I simply objected to greenwashing by bringing up facts.
          Marco Polo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @ imag Not every product introduced to the market, is either the best or will survive. That's the point of competition. But I agree that the process of eliminating inefficient or undesirable products is not perfect.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      WTF is this shiite?
    • Load More Comments