The Toyota Prius, the most popular hybrid in the world, was also the most popular plug-in vehicle in U.S. last month.

Compared to sales of the Chevrolet Volt and the Nissan Leaf, which sold 1,462 and 370 units, respectively, the $32,000 Prius Plug-in quietly sold 1,654 copies in April, reports PluginCars. With such strong name recognition and pent-up demand for a Prius with a cord, this shouldn't really have been a surprise. But it still kind of is.

Toyota sold more Prius models in the U.S. last month than ever before in April (March 2012 was the Prius' best month ever), even though the number of selling days was short. The four members of the "Prius family" sold a combined 25,168 units, an increase of 126.9 percent compared to April 2011 (which was right after the Japanese tsunami). Overall, Toyota and Lexus sold 32,593 hybrids last month, 30,126 of them wearing the Toyota badge, 2,467 of them the upper-class Lexus models.

Last year, Toyota said it expects to sell 16,000-17,000 Prius Plug-in models in 2012. Since Toyota doesn't break out model numbers, we're not sure what the total is for the year thus far, but 1,654 plug-ins a month is enough for the company hit that target. Scroll down below for Toyota's official sales results.
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Toyota Sales Increase 11.6 Percent in April 2012
Camry Up 20.9 Percent; Prius Records Best Ever April


TORRANCE, Calif. (May 1, 2012) – Toyota Motor Sales (TMS), U.S.A., Inc., today reported sales of 178,044 units, an increase of 25.5 percent compared to April 2011 on a daily selling rate (DSR) basis. Unadjusted for 24 selling days in April 2012 versus 27 selling days in April 2011, TMS sales were up 11.6 percent over the year-ago month on a raw volume basis.

The Toyota Division posted April total sales of 160,493 units, an increase of 27.2 percent over April 2011 on a DSR basis. Volume-wise, Toyota Division sales were up 13.1 percent over the year-ago month.

"Thanks to continued strong sales of Camry and Prius family, Toyota was America's number one retail brand for the second straight month," said Bob Carter, Toyota Division group vice president and general manager, Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A. "With consumer confidence improving, we expect to see sustained industry growth in the months ahead."

The Lexus Division reported total sales of 17,551 units, up 12.3 percent over April 2011 on a DSR basis. Volume-wise, Lexus Division sales were flat compared to last year.

Toyota Division
Toyota Division passenger cars posted combined sales of 99,450 units, up 44.3 percent over April 2011. Camry and Camry Hybrid led passenger cars with combined monthly sales of 36,820 units, an increase of 36.1 percent year-over-year. The Prius family recorded its best ever April with sales of 25,168 units, increasing 126.9 percent compared to the same period last year. Corolla reported sales of 24,804 units, up 15.2 percent over the year-ago month. Avalon was also up with sales of 2,881 units, a 20.9 percent increase.

Toyota Division light trucks recorded April sales of 61,043 units, an increase of 6.5 percent compared to April 2011. The RAV4 compact SUV led light trucks, posting monthly sales of 15,196 units, up 9.7 percent over last year. Highlander and Highlander Hybrid reported combined sales of 9,352 units, an increase of 18.3 percent over the year-ago month. The 4Runner midsize SUV recorded April sales of 3,783 units, increasing 5.7 percent. The Tacoma mid-size pickup posted sales of 10,901 units, an increase of 16.7 percent over April 2011, and the Tundra full-size pickup reported sales of 7,219 units. The Sienna minivan recorded sales of 9,451 units.

Scion posted April sales of 5,503 units, up 8.4 percent versus April 2011. The tC sports coupe led the way with sales of 2,008 units, and the xB urban utility vehicle recorded April sales of 1,617 units. The all-new iQ premium micro-subcompact posted monthly sales of 962 units, followed by the xD five-door urban subcompact with 916 units.

Lexus Division
Lexus reported passenger car sales of 9,441 units, up 25.6 percent over April 2011. The entry luxury sedan ES led Lexus passenger car sales with sales of 3,000 units. The IS luxury sports sedan recorded April sales of 2,344 units, flat compared to the same period last year. The GS and GS hybrid posted combined sales of 2,006 units, an increase of 486.2 percent over the year-ago month. The CT 200h premium hybrid compact posted sales of 1,620 units, increasing 108.3 percent year-over-year.

Lexus luxury utility vehicles reported sales of 8,110 units, flat versus April 2011. The RX and RX hybrid posted combined monthly sales of 6,842 units, while the LX recorded sales of 517 units, up 92.6 percent over last April.

TMS Hybrids
TMS posted April sales of 32,593 hybrid vehicles, an increase of 124.6 percent compared to the same period last year. Toyota Division posted sales of 30,126 hybrids for the month, up 142.7 percent over the year-ago month. Lexus Division reported monthly sales 2,467 hybrids, increasing 17.6 percent year-over-year.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 87 Comments
      bobmarley
      • 2 Years Ago
      I didnt even know this car was available. lol so its $32k, do they still have the $7K credit for plug-ins? 25k for the prius or 35k for the volt? hmmm
        montoym
        • 2 Years Ago
        @bobmarley
        There is a credit for the Prius Plug-In, but it's not $7k. The amount is based on the size of the battery and the Prius has a much smaller battery than the Volt (hence it's much shorter battery EV range). The credit is $2500 compared to the Volt's $7500. http://www.plugincars.com/2012-toyota-prius-plug-hybrid-fuel-economy-rating-95-mpge-111849.html quote - "The most striking difference between the Volt and Prius Plug-in Hybrid is the sticker price. Starting at $32,760, Toyota’s Prius Plug-in Hybrid is significantly less expensive than the $39,995 Chevy Volt. However, the Volt qualifies for the full $7,500 federal tax credit, while the Prius Plug-in is only eligible for $2,500. The difference between these tax incentive brings the final purchase price nearly to parity." -
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @bobmarley
        Yes, they qualify. But as with almost all federal tax credits, this tax credit is the lesser of your gross income tax liability or $7.5K. In the case of a lease, the finance company takes the $7.5K and this is reflected in the lease rate.
      Grendal
      • 2 Years Ago
      All of these are vehicles lumped together but they actually appeal to very different buyers - or at least they should. The Leaf is an EV and should be bought by someone driving less than 60 miles a day regularly. Someone buying a Leaf will need something else for long distance travel since it is an impractical car for that. The Volt is appropriate for someone that has a daily commute of 40 miles or less. It's EREV technology allows it to go anywhere a regular car can go but if you're planning on driving long distances regularly it's still not your best choice. The PIP is really just a Prius with a larger battery and most appropriate if your commute is very small. Don't expect it to work like the Volt, however, because it uses gas during normal use.
      1guyin10
      • 2 Years Ago
      At this point arguing about who sold a handful more plug-ins is silly. The real news is that plug-in sales are thawing and even though they will not become a major market force in the immediate future they are clearly here to stay. Leaf will probably take off a bit when US production begins. There are rumors of a price drop at that point as well. It should be interesting to see what happens when there are no supply constraints.
        Donny Hoover
        • 2 Years Ago
        @1guyin10
        I sort of doubt the leaf takes off even with a price drop. I thought about one. I can afford it even at the current price and it would be great for a DD as long as you have something else that can take you on long distances. What I don't have though is a house with a garage, where I could plug it in and unfortunately, a price drop isn't going to change that. Maybe if they got more charging stations put in but you know how that goes. Even if they did, you can't find two brands of cell phone with the same connectors on the charger so what are the chances of finding two cars? I'm also not big on paying my state's personal property tax on something that expensive but that's a whole other issue.
      pickles
      • 2 Years Ago
      Is the Prius ugly? I don't think so. It's the same basic shape as a Masarati Khamsin, an Audi A7, CRX etc.. To me the styling is refined, purposeful and precise. It DOESN'T have a lot of crap in the lines like, say, the cheesy faux-mesh foglight surrounds of a GTI, the useless side vents of an Evoke, Quattorporte, Rendevous, or Focus. It's kinda just right for its market and function. You also can't argue with the beauty of the fat wad of cash a Prius owner will have after years of wasting less fuel...
      Cindy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Lots of Toyota fans I can tell here. Lets stick with basics The volt and leaf are pure electric they can run up to 100 mph on pure electricity. This car is a hybrid and has to move over to the gas engine at 60+ mpg. So either you are going to drive in the slow lane all the time or after 11+ miles use gas. Basically this car is going to use gas during the average commute where the volt and the leaf will not. Sure on very very long trip you may get slightly better millage.
        Donny Hoover
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Cindy
        The volt isn't pure electric. It just has the capability to operate on purely electric but if I remember correctly, it is for something like 40 miles, not 100.
      Bill Cosworth
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Volt if you are flooring it in a cold day with heat blasting will do 35 miles. On a nice day with driving it like a typical Camry Prius driver the volt will easy do 45 miles. Some volt drivers can get at least 50 + miles if they drive well. Also the volt can plug in at work at home for tip ups typical volt no gas driving a day is 60+ miles. Most volt drivers never use gas at all. The car drives like a BMW and not a ecobox like a Toyota. I know some folks who purchased fully loaded volts with leather chrome gps everything for. 42k. With the state and federal rebates 32k. So it never uses gas saving you over 14k in 10 years. So the volt is easily a better value hands down. Its all learning....
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill Cosworth
        [blocked]
          • 2 Years Ago
          [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill Cosworth
        [blocked]
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          It doesn't drive like a BMW but it does drive very well, a lot better than a Prius. I found the Volt and Prius equally as impressive to drive. I personally preferred the ergonomics of the Volt, and the interior was far more substantial, but I'm not keen on its bulbous, dumpy looks.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill Cosworth
        [blocked]
      Andrew
      • 2 Years Ago
      In other news, it's still ugly. More at 11.
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Andrew
        ^ Below the legal driving age.
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Not at all - only people under the driving age make such puerile comments.
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          "Evidently you don't watch Top Gear then - all 3 hosts are older (over 40) and think it's ugly. I am 31 and have to agree that the Prius is not winning any beauty pagents." I've watched TG since its inception in the late 1970s. The current show is purely made for entertainment - for example, Clarkson referred to the iQ as a Zanussi in the television series (Zanussi is an appliance brand for Americans who wouldn't know), yet in his newspaper article, he referred to it as cleverly designed by intellectuals. Understand?
          WillieD
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          So only people under the driving age have eyes?
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          30? Honestly? Seriously, I'm surprised.
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          And Clarkson really is a nice guy - I met him and Quentin Willson at the NEC show in 1998. I've met Willson several on several other occasions at various marketing events, he's a little more aloof than Clarkson.
          methos1999
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Evidently you don't watch Top Gear then - all 3 hosts are older (over 40) and think it's ugly. I am 31 and have to agree that the Prius is not winning any beauty pagents.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Andrew
        [blocked]
          Andrew
          • 2 Years Ago
          How fun, an internet argument. So lets see... I base my opinions about cars on fun to drive and looks. The Prius is ugly, I'd guess it's ugly so it stands out.. Why do I say that? I'm glad you asked! Because people who buy the Prius are trying to make a point that "I love the environment". But really it's about the *looking* that way, not about actually doing it. The amount of energy and environmental destruction it takes to rip that nickel out of the ground and ship it in huge cargo liners is worse than just going and buying a normal looking, high mpg diesel or gas engined vehicle - not to mention recycling all that at the end of its life. Last time I check this is a car blog, it includes comments so users can share their feedback about said cars. I feel the Prius is an ugly car, while this isn't your opinion and I welcome being challenged about my views, calling other users "tools" really doesn't drive home your views of me acting like a teenager... aatblock1967 - I drive a (paid off) Mazdaspeed6, the only American car I've owned was a Jeep Wrangler, so I'd suggest revising poorly thought out assumptions on age and car preferences as they appear inaccurate. You know what they say about assumptions... To review: It's a car forum, people have opinions, you mad bro?
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          Andrew, I appreciate the candid response. I do realise that AB posters arent truly representative of ther American mindset, and anyone can assume any character online. All of these cars are impressive when you think of the engineering behind them. Im always impressed by what it tales to bring any car to market... but thats one for the boozer. I'll take a Caffreys.
          Andrew
          • 2 Years Ago
          I appreciate your response and I completely agree with judging cars on their merits and not where they're made. The Prius does what it's intended for very well - as do most Toyotas. I also agree looks are subjective but it's also one of many aspects of judging a car. While it's no Pontiac Aztec, in my opinion it's just not a handsome car any way you shake it. My initial comment was posted for comedic value, something which was apparently lost - but hey, at least I got a laugh out of it. I hope you don't think all Americans are biased toward a nameplate because of where it's made as that sweeping generalization is another poor assumption. Do keep in mind this is an online forum, it's just not a serious place. If you want a real conversation about cars I'd suggest heading on down to the pub with your friends and talking it out over a pint.
      miketim1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Did anyone expect a different out come ? Hell I would by a Prius too if I wanted a good hybrid... It has made such a name for itself people just over look everything else. Toyota saw something in the Hybrid years ago that everyone else is just seeing. For the people saying its just name... no it isnt. Toyotas Hybrid Tech has been proven over the years and thats one of the many draws that people buy them. I wouldn't be so fast to put my money into a Volt or Leaf I would rather buy something I know or something I know someone else has and has been working great for them. I just hope Toyota can make it better and not just rest on their asses because its selling good. I want to see an see an even better hybrid system Toyota
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @miketim1
        Good post. That's the raw truth of it.
          aatbloke1967
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          "The unspoken truth is that the Prius plug-in does a fraction of what the Volt and Leaf do to give oil a competitor. The only way gas prices are going to come down." The unspoken truth is that Americans use twice as much oil per capita than Europeans and yet, on average, the average commuting distances are identical. Europeans don't drive SUVs and pick-up trucks en masse to the office or to the supermarket. Banging on about the Volt saving the world in this regard is simply ridiculous.
          rlog100
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          The unspoken truth is that the Prius plug-in does a fraction of what the Volt and Leaf do to give oil a competitor. The only way gas prices are going to come down.
          rlog100
          • 2 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Did I say anything about saving the world. Nope. And I see the careful wording you gave on the commuting distance. You wording applies to the length of the commute, but are excluding the number of those who have those commutes or how frequent they are.
        Julius
        • 2 Years Ago
        @miketim1
        "Toyotas Hybrid Tech has been proven over the years and thats one of the many draws that people buy them." Isn't that what "it's the name" meant? It's a Toyota-branded system, that's modified from a current system. There was no guarantee that the PIP would work significantly better than a standard Prius aside from the fact that Toyota's behind it. Just like Consumer Reports routinely rated new Toyota products as "recommended" even with new models, though it never did with other manufacturers. The fact that CR had to pull that "recommended" rating for a year during the recall imbrolio just reinforced that notion that "it's a Toyota, so it's good" is an ingrained mentality with more than just consumers.
      Alex740
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Prius plug-in seems like a bit of joke with only a 13 mile range at best. I'm not a GM fan but I have to say the Volt is incredibly underrated vehicle and I hope it starts getting the love it deserves. If it had a toytota emblem on the hood it would be selling far more units but years of well deserved bad press for GM has made it a very unpopular company with the green crowd.
      Bill Cosworth
      • 2 Years Ago
      This article shows the ignorance of auto blog. Comparing a Volt and LEAF to a Prius is like comparing high tech to 100 year old technology. Lets face it folks the Prius is past it. I know its hard to believe but its old technology. The Volt and Leaf can use absolutely no gas all all speeds the Prius is a fake plugin to bamboozle Toyota loyalists. The volt and leaf can go 20,000 a year on not a drip of gas. This Prius has limited very small range and has to kick in the generator at highway speeds. So basically the people who purchased the Toyota were not educated on the topic. It takes a wile to get up to speed with technology and it might take 10 years before people realize that hybrids are just that... hybrid they are a intermediate technology. Full electric like the volt and leaf will eventually be the normal. But people grow slow.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      eblondmdboy24
      • 2 Years Ago
      Yes I happen to agree this post compares two totally different cars. I think Toyota made this a patch job to cover up they didn't have anything close to the volt.
        Mateica
        • 2 Years Ago
        @eblondmdboy24
        lol.... Prius PHV gets 50 MPG off EV, Volt gets 25% less. This is why Prius is technologically better. Volt sucks, simply... its technology is not up to par. Just the fact that it has bigger battery and costs $10k more does not mean it is better - consumers vote with their wallets. Prius PHV you can quickly recharge anywhere and when off EV mode, it gets bets MPG in business. Volt you need tens of hours to recharge off regular plug and when off battery, it gets very poor MPG. For more money.
          montoym
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Mateica
          @ Grendal The Volt also utilizes a 149hp, 273lb-ft electric motor for its motivation. The PIP combines the ICE and electric motor to produce about 134hp and much less torque than the Volt (273lb-ft vs. 183lb-ft). These figures are evident in the performance of each with the Volt providing much better acceleration than the PPI. Note that the Volt will produce sub 9sec 0-60 times using only the electric motor while the PPI will need to activate the ICE to obtain the fastest times. In EV only mode, the PPI is more like a 20sec 0-60 car, if that. It's electric motor is much less powerful than the Volt's and that's largely why it has to use the ICE so much more often. Again, this is just a different strategy. Toyota built on what they had and essentially gave us a standard Prius with a larger battery for more EV range. GM, on the other hand, gives us an EV with an ICE that's used as a backup. There's virtually no comparison when looking at the EV performance and range of each.
          montoym
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Mateica
          The fact that the Volt has a much larger battery and much longer EV range means that you will be off-EV for much less time than in the PPI. This is a fact. Note how Volt owners are averaging about 1000miles/tank of gasoline. I challenge PPI owners to get anywhere close to that. Secondly, the Volt can be chanrged just as easily as the PPI, there's no difference there as you claim. I think what you are confusing is how much charge you'll get. Since the PPI has a much smaller battery, you can get a full charge more quickly. However, that full charge will still only get you about 1/3 the distance of a full charge int he Volt. So, while you've stopped to recharge for the 2nd time, the Volt will still be on its initial charge. There's also the fact that the PPI has a hard time staying in EV mode as well and will start up the ICE with moderate acceleration and at highway speeds as well. The Volt by comparison, is always in EV mode until the battery falls belwo the set threshold. Methinks you need to read up on the Volt and the PPI a bit more as your facts are definitely biased in the PPI's direction and you are mischaracterizing the Volt as well.
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @eblondmdboy24
        "Yes I happen to agree this post compares two totally different cars. I think Toyota made this a patch job to cover up they didn't have anything close to the volt." In Europe, Toyota offered a plug-in conversion for existing Prius owners back in 2006. It was expensive - about £15K - but it was offered.
        montoym
        • 2 Years Ago
        @eblondmdboy24
        Odd too, considering that they have had mules and such for years now. It's not like it was just thrown together. Basically, what they did is brought us over the Japanese version of their plug-in. The Volt is designed for American commutes of less than 40miles/day while the PPI is designed for Japanese commutes of more like 13miles/day, hence why each has the EV range that they do. I don't see them as totally different cars, they are aiming for a similar goal from a technical standpoint, just with differeing approaches. They are certainly more cloesly related than the Leaf and either the PPI or the Volt in any case. The Volt would certainly be more useful to a larger number of Americans (with it's EV range more closely matchign that of a large majority of Americans), though naturally, it's higher price tempers that demand somewhat.
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