Honda revealed its latest hybrid, an electrified version of the Honda CR-V, at the Shanghai Auto Show. But it's been surprisingly tightlipped about the vehicle. The only concrete details the company would reveal were the absolute basics about its powertrain. Instead of the standard CR-V's turbocharged 1.5-liter engine, it uses a naturally aspirated 2.0-liter Atkinson-cycle four-cylinder. It's connected to two electric motors and has lithium-ion batteries.

No ratings for power or torque are provided, and even the drive wheels aren't mentioned. MotorAuthority reports the powertrain is borrowed from the Honda Accord hybrid, which has the same displacement and configuration as what Honda describes. In the Accord, it makes 212 horsepower, and sends power to the front wheels via a CVT. If the CR-V hybrid has the same output, it will be the most powerful version of the compact crossover, since the most potent CR-V currently is the 190-horsepower turbo model.

The Accord Hybrid manages EPA fuel economy numbers of 49 city and 47 highway. The Accord weighs around 3,400 pounds, while the CR-V weighs around 3,300 pounds. So it would be safe to bet a CR-V equipped with the same powertrain could have numbers close to those.

Honda has not announced availability for the CR-V Hybrid, but it does seem that it's coming to the US, eventually. A Honda representative sent us a statement that reiterated the company's plans to add hybrid versions of its light trucks. It also stated, "CR-V will logically be a part of that, and we'll announce timing for the US at a later date."

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