UPDATE: This story has been changed to incorporate US-market information.

Baby 911. The poor man's Porsche. That's what they called the Boxster when it debuted some 20 years ago. They said the same of the first Cayman when it arrived a decade later, but they stopped saying it when the latest iterations hit the scene two years ago. That's because Zuffenhausen's entry-level models have long since stepped out of their big brother's shadow and into their own. And that appears to be all the more true of the new Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS.

Based on the Boxster S and Cayman S, the new GTS models benefit from an enhanced 3.4-liter flat six that produces 330 horsepower and 273 pound-feet of torque in the roadster or 340 hp and 280 lb-ft in the coupe – representing an increase of 15 hp and 7 lb-ft in either model. Both also come with the Sport Chrono package as standard, along with adjustable suspension and 20-inch alloys, blacked out to match the dynamic headlight surrounds and other muted trim.

Those disappointed by the unavailability of a manual transmission in the fire-prone 911 GT3 will be pleased to note that a six-speed manual comes standard, but those enamored of letting a pair of clutches shift themselves seamlessly will want to spring for the optional seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox. So equipped and with launch control engaged, the Boxster GTS will rocket from 0-60 in 4.4 seconds, while the incrementally lighter, more powerful Cayman will hit it in 4.3. Either way you're looking at a third of a second quicker than the Boxster/Cayman S. The interior has been upgraded with Alcantara trim and sports seats, but while Porsche is offering a stiffer suspension lowered by 20 millimeters in Europe, it doesn't seem to be offering it in the US.

The first mid-engined GTS from Porsche since the 904 Carrera of 1963 will reach showrooms this summer with sticker prices starting at $73,500 for the Boxster GTS and $75,200 for the Cayman GTS, plus $995 for delivery. That makes both a good ten grand more than their S counterparts, but outfit either with the Sport Chrono package and PASM active suspension that come standard on the GTS, and a few other choice options to make your stand out, and that ten-grand price differential will soon evaporate - without the extra power to go with it. Scope out the details in the US-market press release below.
Show full PR text
GTS insignia graces mid-engine Porsche sports car for the first time since 1963
Porsche introduces Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS models

Atlanta. For the first time, the Porsche Boxster and Porsche Cayman will be offered as GTS models. As is typical for Porsche, these models feature more powerful engines and additional standard performance equipment. The new Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS models are visually defined by more than just a badge: they offer as standard equipment unique front and rear fascias, blacked out Bi-XenonTM headlights with the Porsche Dynamic Light System (PDLS), 20-inch Carrera S wheels and a sport exhaust system with black tailpipes as standard. The Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS are built specifically for maximum driving pleasure.

The 3.4-liter 6-cylinder boxer engine of the Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS models delivers an additional 15 hp compared to their "S" model counterparts. This means that the Boxster GTS has 330 hp and the Cayman GTS has 340 hp. Torque has been increased by 7 lb.-ft. in each model: 273 lb.-ft. in the Boxster GTS and 280 lb.-ft. in the Cayman GTS. The Sport Chrono package is now a standard feature with either the 6-speed manual or the optional 7-speed Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) transmission. This means with the optional PDK transmission and Sport Plus button activated, the Boxster GTS reaches 60 mph from a standstill in 4.4 seconds and 4.3 seconds in the Cayman GTS. Top track speed for the Boxster GTS is 174 mph with a manual transmission and 177 mph for a Cayman GTS equipped with a manual transmission.

The Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS feature Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) as standard, which offers the choice of sportier or more comfortable ride settings at the press of a button. The 235/35 front and 265/35 rear tires on 20-inch Carrera S wheels provide the perfect setup for a balanced driving experience. Like other Porsche GTS models, the interior of the Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS feature an Alcantara® wrapped steering wheel, headliner, center console, and inserts on the standard Sport Seats Plus. Additional visual elements include GTS nomenclature embroidered into the headrests and printed on the tachometer face.

A specific standard of performance and uniqueness is required to wear the GTS badge. For example, the legendary 1963 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS was dominant on the racetrack and a spectacle on the street. The 1980s and 1990s saw the 924 GTS and 928 GTS refine this characteristic. In 2007 the GTS emblem was reintroduced on the Cayenne GTS and later implemented in the 911 and Panamera model lines.

The Boxster GTS is priced from $73,500 and the Cayman GTS is priced from $75,200, excluding destination charges of $995. Both models will be available for delivery this summer.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 45 Comments
      occopuyo
      • 9 Months Ago
      If you go into the configurator, it says the base price is $73,500 (doesn't include $995 destination). You're welcome!
      jcar302
      • 9 Months Ago
      There are a few porsche models i really like, such as the GT3 and the 911 turbo S. But i can't help thinking when i see a boxster that it was really meant for some guys wife, not a real enthusiast. Something about it just says feminine in a similar fasion as the bmw z3.
        UWotm8
        • 9 Months Ago
        @jcar302
        It's so sad how certain people's sense of sexual identity is tied to the brand *and* model of the car they drive. We all have our opinions on what "manly" is. For some people, nothing screams "I'm extremely insecure and terrified of being a closet homosexual" more than some dude with tatted up arms and a "Tapout" t-shirt driving a "manly" raised truck. Especially when that manly dude is oh so terrified of all things feminine, including women. Just sayin'. At least they have the decency to never bring that up, because they realize it's actually stupid and a stereotype that says more about *them* than the group they're targeting. The Porsche Cayman is a solid, light, fast, luxurious, amazingly fun to drive vehicle that is within reach of a lot more people than a 911 GT-whatever would be, why **** on that?
        Phlegming Liberal
        • 9 Months Ago
        @jcar302
        Seriously? Have you even driven one?
          Cayman
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Phlegming Liberal
          Apparently he doesn't care what the car drives like, he cars how he looks in the car.
        turkeythundergod
        • 9 Months Ago
        @jcar302
        You're kind of right. The first Boxsters were largely intended as engineering excercises and as a way to sell more cars, by selling a car women liked. That said, it is the superior platform, and everyone knows it. That's why Porsche is very careful with what they do tothe Cayman, they're fearful of eclipsing the 911 with it.
      Where's the cheese?
      • 9 Months Ago
      Just give us a turbo version already!!! Would absolutely blast the R8 on the track and be the favorite mid-engined sports car in the VW family.
        Jonathan
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Where's the cheese?
        I'm actually surprised they're even putting 340 bhp in the GTS as that is in proximity to the 350 bhp base 911. Pigs might fly before Porsche ever puts their 911 Turbo engines in the Cayman.
      sstowes
      • 9 Months Ago
      I'm not the most avid Porsche enthusiast (that's my father-in-law) but the Cayman really is an awesome-looking vehicle.
      Rr778
      • 9 Months Ago
      Cayman gts? I bet that little guy shreds on ramps. Porsches really are the sportiest luxury car out there. Obviously if you wanted a track car there are probably a half dozen cars that handle way better and make more sense $$, but nobody buys a porsche for how it handles on a track. Cayman /biter gts will make phenomenal commuter with a way nicer interior than the m3 or z4
        PatrickH
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Rr778
        I'm sorry, but this is an idiotic statement: " but nobody buys a porsche for how it handles on a track." Statistically, more Porsche owners track their vehicles than owners of other cars, including sports cars. Thus, a lot of people actually do buy a Porsche for how it handles on a track. That includes me BTW.
          Cayman
          • 9 Months Ago
          @PatrickH
          @rr778 You seem to be under the impression that people only have a single criteria when buying a car, my guess is that for all but a small minority (maybe .0001%) that is not the case. Most people have several criteria when buying a car. Yes, I could probably have bought a cheaper car that handled better on the track than my Porsche, but price and track performance were not my only criteria. I also considered styling, reliability, size, and resale value, among other things; but that's not to say that how it performed didn't play a major role in my decision.
          Rr778
          • 9 Months Ago
          @PatrickH
          As a porsche owner do you remotely care that you could have had a far better handling car on the track for less money? Or are you happy with excellent road manners, fantastic design, reliability, and elegance that your porsche has over some those more economical alternatives.
          Rr778
          • 9 Months Ago
          @PatrickH
          Patrick after doing some googling it seems like the cayenne appears to be Porsches best seller and the panamera also represents a large portion as well. It is great that there is a minority of drivers out there who opt to push their cars , the world would be a better place if more drivers did that. But it's just not the focus of the mainstream luxury segment buyer. It's easy to forget that the automotive enthusiast is a very small minority. And that the largest buyer of any and all brands is buying into a brand and perception and not the performance of whatever that manufacturer happens to actually make.
        graphikzking
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Rr778
        How many Autocrosses have you been to? All I see is Porsche and Miata with a few Mustangs, Camaros, Corvette, Civic, and a VERY rare MR2 Spyder (mine), plus an occasional odd car (Caterham etc). I'd say probably 1/3 of the cars are Miata and Porsche is a distant 2nd. Then the rest of the 50% is a mixture of cars. If your area Porsche drivers don't autocross (because I'm certain you go to every event) then that's ashame. I see a deluge of 944's on our track days.
          Rr778
          • 9 Months Ago
          @graphikzking
          Google says porsche sold 162,000 cars in 2013. In your estimate how many 2013 Porsches have you seen at Autocross events?
          Rr778
          • 9 Months Ago
          @graphikzking
          Perhaps you are over estimating the percentage of car drivers that go to an auto cross event. Autocrossers in general represent a very very tiny percentage of drivers. And as such it represents a very very small percentage of buyers of ANY brand, especially buyers of new cars.
          ScottT
          • 9 Months Ago
          @graphikzking
          I'd throw BMW's in there as well. Most track days I've been to have been mostly BMW's, Porsches, Covettes, Miatas, and maybe Z's. Those cars probably make up around 75% of the cars.
        S.
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Rr778
        I read an article or something a while back where Porsche polled GT3 owners, and 80% used theirs on track days. Granted, GT3 =/= Cayman, but I think Porsche owners (outside SUV/Panamera) are more motoring enthusiasts than we're giving them credit for.
          Rr778
          • 9 Months Ago
          @S.
          So 850 gt3?(being generous) drivers out of 160,000 porsche buyers? Wow that is a really small percentage.
          Rr778
          • 9 Months Ago
          @S.
          Scott you are absolutely right nobody and .0000001% were generalizations. But the point is pretty obvious most car buyers will never Autocross their car And that applies to porsche and any other brand really.
          ScottT
          • 9 Months Ago
          @S.
          No, I think he's saying it's 80% of the 850 GT3's. That doesn't mean non-GT3's don't see track time. The one datapoint we have for one model starts at 80%, which is more than "nobody" and .00001%
        Cayman
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Rr778
        "nobody buys a porsche for how it handles on a track." Uh, what????
          Rr778
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Cayman
          Cayman perhaps numbers are the easiest way to show to you that porsche has done a great job of moving past being a niche manufacturer and you should give them more credit. 2013 porsche sold over 160k cars. What is your best guess on how many of those cars saw track time?
          Rr778
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Cayman
          I do see Porsches at track days you are right about that. But it is an A drop in the pond of overall porsche sales. I also notice that those cars are typically track only cars that are trailered and probably don't handle the same as their street counterparts.as with most cars of other brands that I see at track days. So I guess for those cars how a stock car performs on the track is again irrelevant as long as it's a decent platform to modify from. Your not giving porsche enough credit, they sell a lot of vehicles, and they are no longer a niche brand that sells low volumes. They have done a great job of shifting their focus to high margin higher volume segments, and that has really helped them fund development of their entire lineup. At 75k there's probably what 10 cars that have better handling and can post a better lap time? And that is okay, because that's not porsche concern.
        Jonathan
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Rr778
        I get what the OP is trying to say. There's a little old lady who lives up the street from me that daily drives a Guards Red 911 4S (why does she need 4WD in California if she isn't tracking!!!); the paint is perfect and she drives it about 10mph in our 20mph residential area. There are a LOT of Porsche/BMW/Corvette/insert-performance-car-here owners that will never track or autocross their cars. But simply because they outweigh numerically the numbers of owners that do track their cars should not lead you to make an unfounded statement of "nobody buys a porsche for how it handles on track." I see a lot of Porsche's at track days, and I'd imagine that if you factored for cost of vehicle, they would have a greater representation than many other makes/models (because Porsche's are more expensive, you tend to see less of them than say a FR-S/BRZ).
        ccg
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Rr778
        I drive my Cayman on the track.
      Charles Robichaud
      • 9 Months Ago
      does it come with oven mitt racing gloves???!!!
        ScottT
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Charles Robichaud
        Original.
        Ken
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Charles Robichaud
        I love Porsche so much, I'd pay extra for my car to catch on fire, and extra yet again for the mitts!
      Haji
      • 9 Months Ago
      no, don't rush for your chequebooks. the RS version will follow, and the anniversary edition, and the clubsport, ant the ...
        waetherman
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Haji
        If you told me that a new Boxster Spyder was on the way, I'd definitely wait...
      Level4
      • 9 Months Ago
      omg look a new bumper...yawn
      graphikzking
      • 9 Months Ago
      So strange. I feel like every time I read about the Boxster and Cayman they are increasing HP by 10,15 hp and yet I feel like the HP is still the same.
        Jonathan
        • 9 Months Ago
        @graphikzking
        Probably because most of that power gain is at the top of the rev-range, and unless you track often you won't be in that power range as frequently as around town.
      bonehead
      • 9 Months Ago
      Great car made even better. Only question i have is do people really like that alcantara or suede interior? I understand it can be grippy and hold you in place better but man that stuff wears so fast. Every car ive ever seen with it looks horrible in a few years. Honestly what id love in a performance focused car is a grippy cloth interior. It doesnt need to be an animal product to be nice IMO. I also dont like the suede on the wheel. you will quickly have greasy looking hand prints just from normal skin oils.
      turkeythundergod
      • 9 Months Ago
      Typically the GTS models represent a slight savings over equipping an S car equally. Since the Cayman S I built included all the GTS features along with a few others, I would guess my Cayman GTS would work out to $80-82k This is what love os I guess.
      RetrogradE
      • 9 Months Ago
      Very tidy kit. Expensive, but I like it.
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