Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

  • Ford Focus Electric
  • Ford Focus Electric

Along with Renault-Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn, Ford CEO Alan Mulally is confident in the growth of the electric car segment. It's a long-term play, though, so Mulally isn't committing the electric Ford Focus EV to making a strong sales statement. For now, Ford's chief says he'd be fine moving fewer than 5,000 Focus EVs in the model's first full year. And even that would mean a steep rise in uptake based on just 12 having been sold in December and January.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Mulally has also let slip the cost for the battery pack in the all-electric Focus: "around $12,000 to $15,000," which makes the Focus Electric's starting cost of $39,200 a bit more understandable. Given that price range and the EV's 23-kWh battery, that means Ford's cost is between $522 and $650 per kWh, which is lower than the estimated $689-per-kWh industry average so far this year.

Reportage on the current sales of EVs is a bit schizophrenic – for example, bullish here, bearish here, but the commentators and the numbers seem to support Mulally's confidence. If the Focus EV did manage 5,000 sales this year, that would be a little more than half of the 2011 tally for the Nissan Leaf, yet according to Bloomberg, EV market share grew more quickly than any other segment in Q1: Nissan is still working through its Leaf pre-order list, Chevrolet Volt sales were up 277 percent to 2,129 units vs. March 2011, the Opel Ampera has exceeded sales expectations, and other electric vehicles and their marketing pushes will come online later this year. Oh, and gas prices are still climbing.

There were no Focus EVs sold in February or March, but the retail push is gearing up now for the Spring season.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 59 Comments
      mbmorrow4
      • 2 Years Ago
      Anyone else old enough to remember whrn a Pulsar digital watch cost $500 and a VCR with a wired remote was $800? As more electric cars are made and sold, the prices will drop substantially. The range will increase with each new generation of batteries.
      carknowitall21
      • 2 Years Ago
      Still don't understand why automakers choose to load the electric models up with extra features. Why not make nav, MyFord touch, upgraded audio, rain sensing wipers, smart key, etc. optional features instead and then charge a few grand less for the starting price?
        lorenzo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @carknowitall21
        Because they are selling this thing at a loss even with the subsidies. So they have to get the price up any way they can and increasing the trim level is a cheap way to get more money for them.
      Polly Prissy Pants
      • 2 Years Ago
      A $40,000 FOCUS! OUTRAGEOUS!!!!
        lorenzo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Polly Prissy Pants
        SCREW THAT! I COULD BUY A USED BOXSTER FOR THAT $$$
      wrestleprocbt
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ok, so we don't want the cars but emit exhaust but yet, we will spend all night charging them from an electric source that is created by coal? or other fossil fuels? How does this not make sense. What makes even less sense is $30 to $40k for these little guys. Give me a nice SUV or Lg Sedan and call it a day for $40k! I'll suck it up at the gas pump, surely gas will start coming down soon as the election gets closer! What a coincidence!
        merlot066
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wrestleprocbt
        The majority of the electricity in the initial release states is produced by natural gas and renewables (hydroelectric, solar, and wind). Also, wind and solar is growing rapidly around the United States and Ford has plans to partner with solar home conversion companies to give people rebates to convert their homes to solar power.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wrestleprocbt
        [blocked]
        oRenj9
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wrestleprocbt
        Hey, look at you missing the point. The people who like electric cars are far less concerned about the environment than you seem to pretend they are. I personally would drive the **** out of an electric car and I regularly drive two catless cars. The "stupid environmentalists" argument is a straw man, and not even a very good one. In reality, the market for these cars are well-off, high-tech workers who want a vehicle that pushes is pushing boundaries. These people are not terribly concerned with their image, so spending $40k on a Focus that has everything they want is more important to them than buying the latest SUV to keep up with the Joneses. These cars are far closer to a personal pleasure item than a political statement; and we all know that nobody buys vibrators to save the planet. So, you can keep pretending that people are buying these for economy or to save the planet, then make the argument that they are being idiots because the current crop of electric cars are none of those. But the facts are that people are not buying them for that reason, so you just end up sounding like you are completely out-of-touch.
        brian
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wrestleprocbt
        If you're so concerned about the use and cost of fossil fuels - Why don't you have a solar panel on the roof of your house already?
      lorenzo
      • 2 Years Ago
      I hope a bunch of fools dont comment: "A $40,000 FOCUS! OUTRAGEOUS!!!!" Because it isn't, and AB left that part out just to drive up comments, because comment #'s are directly tied to ad revenue. They are in the business of provoking people.
      AcidTonic
      • 2 Years Ago
      This $40,000 electric Focus is relevant, needed, and not too much of a Niche vehicle to avoid production. But a $35,000 full-time AWD turbocharged 2.0 liter Focus with around 300 horsepower and a manual transmission is just so much of a hardcore niche product that we can't have one. I bet I know which car would sell better..... I would be excited to dump $40K into the AWD car if was really well optioned. But this electric nonsense..... heh I wouldn't even pay the base price of $16,000 for that car, let alone the 40K they are asking. I guess all those electric sales are much more important than proving that Americans can produce a real competitive small performance car. We show off a 1000 horsepower GT500 yet our 600hp AWD Fiesta WRC has a better 0 to 60. That's the car people want. You can keep your heavy GT500. And this electric Focus nobody wants.
        oRenj9
        • 2 Years Ago
        @AcidTonic
        As much as I would love to see an AWD, turbo Focus, there are other cars on the market that offer what you are asking for in that price range. I can understand why Ford can't make a business case for trying to compete in that market. The WRX is just too damn good of a vehicle and Ford would be hard-pressed to dethrown it for $26k.
        lorenzo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @AcidTonic
        Wow, now I am even getting sick of seeing your broken record comments. Elmo! Where are you?! School this child please!!
      Vu
      • 2 Years Ago
      wow... $39K for a Focus... back to the Prius...
      sp33dklz
      • 2 Years Ago
      Price... Is.... Everything. No one in their right mind would drop $40k on a sub-compact A - to - B car without some serious government subsidies. Well, I'm sure there might be a thousand idiots out there, but in a sea of millions, that's just just fish food.
      steve_macdonald
      • 2 Years Ago
      "It's a long-term play, though" Yup. 100 years and counting. Actually, electric cars were far *more* popular 100 years ago than they are today. A little thing called "physics" got in the way. Well at least it did until "green" became the world's newest mass religion.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @steve_macdonald
        by physics you mean low energy density of the batteries that were available at the time. by mass religion, you mean gas prices and peak oil looming ahead. got it
          MTU 5.0
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Haven't we hit "peak oil" about 458 times now? I have no problem thinking toward the future, but "looming ahead", what does that mean?
      Emmsys
      • 2 Years Ago
      I love the styling (the tail lights took a while to get used to) and I would be the perfect candidate for an EV (i.e. I can afford it, the range is beyond plenty and hydroelectricity is dirt cheap here in Quebec). But $39200 US would probably translate to $45000 CDN plus nearly 15% sales tax and you have a $51000 Ford Focus. To Ford: I love what you guys are doing (can't wait for the new Fusion) but there's no way in hell I would drop that kind of money on a Focus. No...just...no.
      Autoblogist
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not surprising, they are coming late to the game with, nothing groundbreaking and a price point that makes, it's already slow selling competitors seem like a better choice.
      yyz
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'll let Ed Begley Jr. or Daryl Hannah be the guinea pigs on these electric cars. Maybe they will be commercially viable without government incentives in another 20 years or so. But not today. I'll keep driving my ICE propelled car, thank you very much.
        suthrn2nr
        • 2 Years Ago
        @yyz
        Not sure why your comment is thumbed down, i guess it does sound kind of arrogant, but I have a simlar view to yours: makes these electric vehicles now so those with the means can buy them so that it brings price down in the future.
          montoym
          • 2 Years Ago
          @suthrn2nr
          Well, if thy're being bought by those with the means to do so, then why are we also giving them a tax rebate to buy them? Wouldn't they still have the means to buy them even without the rebate?
        lorenzo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @yyz
        Funny, I see plenty of Leafs on the streets where I live - and I dont live in Hollywood
          Johnny
          • 2 Years Ago
          @lorenzo
          San Fran doesn't count.
        Zoom
        • 2 Years Ago
        @yyz
        Prius was subsidized for about 10 years. Either by the Japanese government or by Toyota itself (Prius sold at a loss for many years). And look where Toyota is today, leading the hybrid charge. Maybe GM should take the $10k hit and sell Volts at MSRP $22-27k, yes at a loss but with the potential to get them into more and more hands.
    • Load More Comments