• Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
  • Image Credit: IndyCar
Back in May, IndyCar revealed renderings showing what the 2018 race cars would look like, and now we finally get to see one of the versions in real life. The new car features a body with two variations, one for high-speed ovals, and one for short ovals and road courses, and the one IndyCar showed was the high-speed oval iteration. Both types of body will be used by both Chevrolet and Honda, rather than each manufacturer having its own unique aerodynamic kits.

The body itself, which sits on the current IR-12 chassis that dates back to 2012, looks far less busy and bulky than the outgoing 2017 model. This is due to a number of major changes including a dramatically lowered rear wing, removal of the rear wheel guards, and a lower engine cover. IndyCar also says that the designers were conscious of making the car look good, not just with better aerodynamics, and that some of the design inspiration came from '90s Indy cars.

There are some functional changes to go along with the new look. The car is lighter than the outgoing model, and the weight is positioned farther forward, something IndyCar says drivers were asking for. IndyCar also says that air coming off the cars is less turbulent, and should allow cars to follow more closely than in the past few years. The body will also be able to accept a windshield like one of the ones tested for Formula 1, if one is developed and approved for use.

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