• May 6, 2011
2011 Nissan Leaf – Click above for high-res image gallery

Mark Reuss, president of General Motors North America, recently voiced his opinions on a slew of issues with the Nashville Business Journal. Reuss spoke of GM's future, the role of the Chevrolet Volt and more. But when the discussion turned to the Nissan Leaf, it became obvious that Reuss is not a fan of the electric hatch.

Reuss explained what he believes to be the most significant drawbacks of electric-only vehicles like the Leaf, stating:
[The Leaf] has a finite range and requires infrastructure and charging to run it, where the Volt is really an extended-range electric vehicle. The Volt can really be the only car you own. You better be living within a certain range for the Leaf. ... It's a lot different market, a lot different car and a completely different driver.
While we think that Reuss should've stopped at that, he didn't. Reuss continued to rag on the Leaf, boldly stating that:
I'm not sure if I'd put the Leaf in the hands of my three kids. Say, what if they can't charge it? What if they get to school and can't charge it? The Leaf is a single-purpose car.
Did Reuss' statements to a little too far? Let us know what you think by voicing your thoughts in 'Comments' below.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 182 Comments
      oi8thepie
      • 3 Years Ago
      I agree with his comments except the part about a teenager not knowing how to charge it. I'd bet my 16 year old nephew would learn how to charge a Leaf quicker than my dad (75 years old) would.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @oi8thepie
        [blocked]
      Enrique
      • 3 Years Ago
      He forgot to mention that the other reason is his kids already own fully electric cars..........Tesla Roadsters.
      Craig Fitzgerald
      • 3 Years Ago
      If his kids are too stupid to plug it in, they're probably too stupid to figure out how to put gas in it.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Craig Fitzgerald
        [blocked]
      darthjayson
      • 3 Years Ago
      Volt = hybrid. That's why the Leaf requires a different mindset and infrastructure. Because unlike the Volt, the Leaf is a radically new thing.
        Logan
        • 3 Years Ago
        @darthjayson
        the volt is the most advanced hybrid ever manufactured. Nothing like the volt has ever been made before. The is leaf is not radically new by any means. Electric cars were around since the turn of the 20th century. Also in the 90s there was the ev1, rav4 ev, and many others.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Logan
          [blocked]
        Dom
        • 3 Years Ago
        @darthjayson
        The Leaf isn't radically new. It's only difference from earlier electric cars, such as GM's EV1, is that it uses more advanced batteries that weren't available in the 1990s. The Leaf doesn't even have an active warming/cooling system for its battery pack--just a fan like a standard laptop uses. Dont' get me wrong, it's a great addition to the marketplace, but it's not radically new or radically advanced. The Volt is both of those things.
        Shiftright
        • 3 Years Ago
        @darthjayson
        I quite disagree. It's the very opposite in fact. Pure EVs have been around for ages. Nissan just perfected it, to a point at least. Although not completely unique in technology, the Volt is the first in concept.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
        [blocked]
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        jmjcubbin
        • 3 Years Ago
        The Leaf is not outselling the Volt in the US. It's not even close.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @jmjcubbin
          [blocked]
        ThinkAboutIt
        • 3 Years Ago
        But according to the latest sales figures, the Leaf is NOT outselling the Volt.
      Jerry Winfield
      • 3 Years Ago
      He is correct in his assessment of the Leaf.
      SpeedyRacer
      • 3 Years Ago
      Incredibly self serving trash talk from someone who has an interest in seeing his competitors fail. Not classy at all. Not accurate at all. The Volt does not have unlimited range either. About 20% of the market drives within LEAF's range, has a place for a charging station at home, and has another car(s) and is willing to share cars (U of Davis study). 20% of the market would be about 2.6 million vehicles per year. I think Nissan can live with that. As for me I would be happy to put my kids in a 5 star safety rated car like LEAF.
        Dump
        • 3 Years Ago
        @SpeedyRacer
        Ruess' point is that the Volt has a range-extender powertrain system. The Volt isn't limited to only the battery range capability. The Volt have be driven maybe 400-500 miles on 1 tank of gas if driven long distances. If a person's daily commute is between 40-60 miles total each day --- they could possible drive almost a month on 1 tank of gas. Image if at least 50% of the people on the roads today only needed to refill their gas tank once a month --- pollution would definitely decrease, the average consumer would have extra cash for more food, movies, clothing, gadget, etc. --- the overall retail market would be booming with business.
        Efrain G
        • 3 Years Ago
        @SpeedyRacer
        The Volt does have unlimited range. Once the battery power is low the 1.4L Generator kicks in and will provide electric to the electric motors. You may continue to drive the vehicle and fill up on gas until you can charge the battery. Also the Volt charges in about half the time as the Leaf and has a temperature control on the battery. The Leaf uses a air cooled system which is not as effective at keeping the battery temperature regulated.
      viper3ez
      • 3 Years Ago
      so what he is saying is, The Volt is better at being an electric car, so pay us 40k for a car that does exactly what the prius does better. noted!
        • 3 Years Ago
        @viper3ez
        [blocked]
        mikemaj82
        • 3 Years Ago
        @viper3ez
        the prius is mad ugly though. seriously. my eyes hurt looking at it.
      brian
      • 3 Years Ago
      If I had kids that were of driving age, I'd INSIST that they have a Leaf: With a Leaf, they can only go so fast & so far before running out of juice - There's no reason on earth that a teenager needs to be more than 50 miles away from home on their own or to spend more than 100 miles on the road in a single day. They don't need to go joyriding on the Freeway to get to & from School, activities and their part-time jobs/volunteer work. They don't need to be "Fast & Furious" on the way to where they're going. They need to learn responsibility & consequences for their actions (or lack thereof) - and that means plugging in the car when they get home or they're stuck riding their bike tomorrow.
        Polly Prissy Pants
        • 3 Years Ago
        @brian
        That sounds awesome in theory, until your daughter is stuck 15 miles from home at 11:00pm with a dead Leaf. The only way you're getting that back is to call a wrecker. Guess who's paying for that. Or they need to get to work or the Friday night football game where he's the starting runningback and it's dead. Trust me, you'll be driving them. In the real world there's no way I'd let me teenage kids drive a Leaf either. If you're afraid of them doing donuts and 150mph on the freeway then buy them a used Corolla.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Polly Prissy Pants
          [blocked]
          brian
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Polly Prissy Pants
          Why is she out at 11PM in the first place? Why was he driving over 100 miles that day? Leaf has a range of over 100 miles and it has a gauge that tells them how much farther they can reasonably expect to drive before recharging Schools aren't more than a few miles from home - and the car isn't for joyrides or taxi service for friends. Perhaps there will come an occassion that the kid does run out of juice once - but I guarantee you it never happens again.
          Polly Prissy Pants
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Polly Prissy Pants
          Wouldn't need to call a wrecker to retrieve a Volt that ran out of gas. And it WILL happen to both.
        Logan Wild
        • 3 Years Ago
        @brian
        Guess it depends on how old your kids are and what state you live in. Have you ever been to Texas? 50+miles is not uncommon for a daily drive.
      Mike K
      • 3 Years Ago
      Spoken like a True Exec of a company that has no future. I'd rather have a Prius then the Volt. The gas engine in the Volt is the same engine as the Chevy Cruze, thus having no additional emissions controls on the engine. What a waste.
        lne937s
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Mike K
        No, it is the same block as the Cruze, but a naturally aspirated, less complicated version. That engine has appeared overseas previously in low-priced economy cars.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Mike K
        [blocked]
        Matthew Wright
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Mike K
        Yes, a company with no future... And how would you be backing this claim up?
      Car Guy
      • 3 Years Ago
      What he said is entirely true. With a leaf, if you run out of charge, you are calling a tow truck. That's the reality of a pure EV.
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