• Sep 16, 2009
Go to Frankfurt, get $82.5 million. That's sort of what happened to Tesla Motors, which is at the big Frankfurt Motor Show this week and received an "opportunistic" equity investment in that amount from a group led by Fjord Capital Partners. Tesla CEO Elon Musk said that his company was "not looking for money," but did not turn down the offer.

FCM's slogan is "clean energy investments for a low carbon world," and Bloomberg reports that Tesla may use the FCM money to expand its retail stores around the world. Earlier this year, Daimler invested in the electric car start-up, as well.

Also in Frankfurt, Tesla delivered the 700th Roadster to 24-year-old German law student Lennart Hennig. The young man didn't just opt for the standard Roadster, either. Henning is now the proud owner of an electric blue Roadster Sport.

[Source: Bloomberg]


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  • 14 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Always thought I would be excited to see the Tesla.
      Saw my first one in town 2 days ago and it was downright bland and boring.
      Dark blue roadster.
      Not good looking or impressive at all.
      • 5 Years Ago
      If they just delivered 700th, that means they've only made about 91 million from sales, 50-100 more from pre orders. It seems like they are still running off of investment money. With everyone else going for the cheap green machines, I don't really see a great future for Tesla unless if they get in on the cheaper green machines.
      Krazeeddd
      • 5 Years Ago
      Tell me this isn't just the precurser to a future class action. A Law student and a Tesla? My bet is the trauma of a dead battery in one of those long Alpine Tunnels.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Krazeeddd
        @ Krazeeddd

        Ah, but you're forgetting that this isn't an American law student. If it was, you'd probably be right.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Since Tesla is now apparently getting private investment money, they should pay back the heavy taxpayer subsidies they have received from the US Government.

      An expensive, impractical toy like the Tesla is not an appropriate use of the taxpayer's money.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Being one, I wish American law students could afford Tesla Roadsters...
        • 5 Years Ago
        Walmart culture!!! (FTL)

        We are the country that took discounting global - That just means that Tesla roadsters will have their chinese-built and GM badged discount versions soon enough, for the low low (always low) price of $39,995
        • 5 Years Ago
        I wish even 25% of Americans could afford a Tesla. Sadly, thanks to the Walmart culture it'll never happen.
        • 5 Years Ago
        The trade deficit is at the heart of our problems. China is but one example. The wealth of this country was largely built on agriculture and manufacturing. You can disagree with your well articulated wall of text, but you cannot fool everyone. Everyone has an opinion and here is one of them:

        "The U.S trade deficit is a bigger threat to the domestic economy than either the federal budget deficit or consumer debt and could lead to political turmoil... Right now, the rest of the world owns $3 trillion more of us than we own of them."

        - Warren Buffet to the Associated Press, January 20, 2006

        The trade deficit the United States has with the rest of the world has accelerated from under $100 billion to over $700 billion from 1991 to 2005. If you do not see this as a problem then you are blind.
        • 5 Years Ago
        And I live in a land where I have one car and it cost me $3900. America! (where at least I know I'm free ;-)
        • 5 Years Ago
        We live in a land where law students should be able to have a $120,000 second car.

        Oh the humanity!
        • 5 Years Ago
        @daleam
        Actually it's because of the Walmart culture that you might someday be able to afford an electric car. Competition drives prices down, and free trade and investment help everyone get more money.
        No not everyone will be able to afford a 125,000 car, but everything would cost more without free global competition.
        And the belief that somehow we have to have manufacturing to be rich is plainly idiotic. A place like Hong Kong has tons of money and plenty of exotic sports cars but it's no manufacturing powerhouse.
        When someone in Europe buys a Dell laptop with an Intel chip running Microsoft Windows then connects their iPod to it most of that stuff is manufactured in China or Malaysia but if you think the Chinese manufacturers are the ones that get most of the money you're an idiot. Sure you could force all those US companies to only manufacture in the USA, but then the iPod would cost so much money it'd never be competitive against music players from Japan, South Korea, or China like Sony's Walkman mp3 players. And nobody would buy Dell laptops anywhere, they'd buy Lenovo laptops. And intel chips wouldn't be competitive because they couldn't manufacture in China like companies that asked TMSC to manufacture in China could.
        And all this is ignoring the fact that if you forced other countries out of your market they'd do the same to you.
        A trade deficit isn't actually a problem if enough of your deficit in goods exchanged is actually going to your own companies. And like 90% of the time when you buy something made in China it's an American company that's manufacturing there.
        Why do you think that the economy managed to grow over the last 30 years even though manufacturing shrunk? We've made money on manufacturing elsewhere, lots of it.
        The PROBLEM in the US is that the money we made gets largely distributed to the top brass at those corporations and their shareholders, and the people who used to hold manufacturing jobs didn't really get a cut even though the country as a whole didn't really lose any money. So all the money has been shifting upwards towards the richest people.
        That's why the wealth gap in the US has grown through the last 4 decades:
        http://money.cnn.com/2006/08/29/news/economy/wealth_gap/
        But that's just it, the problem is that we're no longer splitting the pie as evenly-the pie didn't really get smaller, the economy actually grew.
        Forcing manufacturing back over here wouldn't make the pie bigger since people would just stop buying our products. The solution is to get more of the population to focus on being the people designing new products and technologies, as well as getting the wealthiest to spend their money to help create jobs. Of course this is easier said than done.
        Either way though I don't think we'll ever all be able to afford $125,000 cars, but at the very least the Walmart culture means that BYD's electric cars will force other electric car makers to keep their price competitive. That Toyota's Prius will force other hybrid manufacturers to lower their prices (although hopefully not by making a horrible car like Honda did). And that's just it-competition helps the common man live a better life.
        For one thing Walmart has actually saved Americans more money than the total amount of goods they've ever sold-in other words they lowered the average price of everything by more than 50%. And I don't know about you but I certainly remember the old days when you purchased stuff out of mom and pop shops. While they sound charming when reminiscing now they were also about mom and pop trying to get as much money out of you as possible, and if you didn't have some serious haggling skills or good knowledge of pricing you'd end up paying some pretty insane markups.
        • 5 Years Ago
        And Chinese crap quality to go with it. By the time Walmart has fully completed the conversion of our economy to that of a third world $*ithole with minimum wage jobs, again, and still, nobody will be able to afford it.
        • 5 Years Ago
        heck, i wish american vfx professionals could afford one!
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