Of all the bodystyles that Minis have worn over the years – and there have been a lot of them – few have attained the kind of cult status as the Moke. A sort of quirky take on the beach buggy, the Mini Moke was marketed by various concerns until 1993, the year before BMW bought the brand and later relaunched production with its neo-retro design.

Ever since then, Mini has toyed with the idea of bringing back the Moke, and even showcased the Beachcomber concept in the style of the Moke at the 2010 Detroit Auto Show. But it opted instead to go with the Paceman crossover coupe with its fixed roof.

A certain cadre of enthusiasts may have been disappointed, but they'll be glad to know that they can still get their hands on a continuation of the classic from Moke International. In partnership with Sicar Engineering and Chinese automaker Chery Motors, the Moke is back (sans the Mini name that belongs to BMW) with a reinterpreted form by British designer Michael Young. It's got room for four, an integrated ice cooler, but no doors, roof or windows, staying true to the original design brief.

Power comes from a naturally-aspirated 1.0-liter four with less than 50 horsepower. Mated to a five-speed manual, it drives the front wheels to reach a top speed quoted at 68 miles per hour. There's also an electric-powered eMoke with an unspecified powertrain that's said to propel it up to 37 mph and for as long as 75 miles on a single charge. In other words, it's not going anywhere fast, but still, upgraded suspension and brakes are always appreciated. Only 1,000 cars are slated to be produced each year, available in one of six exterior shades, four interior trims and two fabric roof colors.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      I seems not many AB readers are familiar with the original Mini Moke. This like British vehicle was a bit of an oddity for a nation with notoriously lousy weather. Nonetheless, between 1964 and 1968, 14.518 Mokes were produced in the UK, helped largely by the popularity of the original BMC Mini, and the cult TV hit sci-fi program 'Prisoner' . But, it was in Australia that the Moke became a huge success, both domestically, and as an export. Between , 1966 and 1981 over 30,000 of these little vehicles were produced in a wide variety of models and combinations. As increasing safety regulations were introduced, production was shifted to Portugal where between 1980 and 1993 a final 10,000 were produced. Like the original Mini, these were really fun vehicles, and great for resort hire. Like the original Mini they were also dangerous little death traps and very difficult to maintain. I would imagine that to economically build a Moke to comply with modern safety requirements, would be extremely difficult. (But they were great fun, when I wore a younger mans clothes :)
      Car Guy
      • 1 Year Ago
      I didn't know what a Mini Moke was until the Wheeler Dealer guy's did one a couple of seasons ago. Cute little car. Sometimes you can't help but to love oddball things.
      John P
      • 1 Year Ago
      I had my 1967 Austin Mini-Moke for 8 years-even toted a 15 foot canoe and 4 people inthe car-I once even toted 770# of street bricks. More fun than my Morris Mini Cooper S with the full kit including a Webasto roof. The Moke had an Abarth exhaust & Les Leston wood rim steering wheel-Great fun to drive to work when I was with General Motors in the Chevrolet Motor Div. $ 750 brand new from local BMC dealer.
      Peter
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ah the Chinese bring back the best of British Leyland legendary reliability with a reinterpretation of 1960's era econobox style fittings safety and performance. What could possibly go wrong?
      Wacko
      • 1 Year Ago
      So it's part golf cart, part jeep, and part mini. Only problem is they took the worst parts of each to make this
        aatbloke1967
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Wacko
        Another American child unfamiliar with the Moke.
          Wacko
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          I know what the Moke is, and Not American.... The original moke is cool, but this is a recreation that looks more odd than the original. Sorry about your butthurt aatbloke1967
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Wacko by name, wacko by nature evidently. Just yet another of the plethora of idiots on Autoblog.
      BipDBo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Oh my, what a horrible little thing. Please, put it out of its misery.
      G8
      • 1 Year Ago
      Knew the Chinese had to be involved somehow, just from the picture. And yes I remember the original Moke. This ain't it.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @G8
        @ G8 Yes it is ! It's built using the same panel pressings.
      Teleny411
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'd rather see a Fist Jolly revival. :)
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      How did this get the "green" tag?
        Marco Polo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        @ Rotation Oh, I dunno, if you asked Michael Young nicely, I'm sure you could buy a Moke with green paintwork :) ( seriously, there's a rather pathic EV version mooted).
      Cruising
      • 1 Year Ago
      Still waiting for a Mini Pick Up revival. Just go to Google Images and marvel at the wonderful world of the Mini Pick Up.
      jonwil2002
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks like someone hit a Land Rover Defender with a shrink ray then pulled off the doors and stuff...
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