• Image Credit: carpix
  • Image Credit: carpix
  • Image Credit: carpix
  • Image Credit: carpix
  • Image Credit: carpix
  • Image Credit: carpix
  • Image Credit: carpix
  • Image Credit: carpix
Judging by the numerous concept vehicles from Smart lately, we can pretty much already tell what the future has in store for the brand's growing lineup. Still, these new spy shots give us our first look at the next Fortwo being tested with what looks to be a production-ready nose.

Although this mule still uses cobbled together pieces from a Renault Twingo that we've seen in previous spy shots, the camouflaged front end shows a likeness to recent concepts like the Fourjoy and Forstars. This includes the short, flat nose, an enlarged grille and the headlight shape, but one noticeable difference is the addition of marker lights positioned just below the main beams. From what we hear, the next-gen Fortwo will be unveiled early next year at the Geneva Motor Show, and it will be slightly bigger than the current model.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 33 Comments
      chrismcfreely
      • 1 Year Ago
      The original idea of the smart was good, but to totally screw up the name, engine, tranny, efficiency, and suspension is a hell of a lot of stuff to fail at.
      Koenigsegg
      • 1 Year Ago
      that is the crappy renault not the smart, the 2013 smarts front end is perfected, it looks awesome
        Klinkster
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Koenigsegg
        You must be easy to please if that's you're version of "perfected". That said, I have a run down - er I mean luxury historical home for you to buy. I'll keep you in mind for a quick purchase.
      redgpgtp97
      • 1 Year Ago
      Fail!
      Steve
      • 1 Year Ago
      What the? Who buys this? What is this ****box?
      Ducman69
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wish somebody would make a regular length but really narrow car for the ultra-compact class for better high speed performance and efficiency. A great way to do this would be to make it a two seater and give them either a typical aircraft style front/back setup or perhaps stagger the driver and passenger and just give it a little trunk. Unfortunately, these microcars tend to be like phone booths, extremely tall and very wide compared to their length which is an aerodynamic and handling disaster, bucking like a donkey over uneven roads, lots of wind noise, low top speed, and poor 75mph cruising efficiency.
        Brian P
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ducman69
        This is meant to be a city car, not a high speed cruiser. Aero is not that important at city-traffic speeds. Ease of parking, on the other hand, favors a short vehicle. If you are buying something for mostly highway driving, just get something else. If you have to deal with city traffic and congested parking lots (and small driveways or garages) the smart works well, and a lengthened body in the interest of aerodynamics would defeat its purpose.
          Ducman69
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian P
          Brian P, you really need to learn to read. To recap: 1) I said you were wrong when it comes to most American cities, I didn't say you said anything about American cities. Get your head out of your ass. 2) What part of "when it comes to wind resistance and parking" was confusing to you? How do they let people like you graduate highschool without fourth grade reading comprehension skills? It was obvious what he was saying.
          Ben Dover
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian P
          VW XL1 had no stability issues, and is very narrow. The difference though is that its not as tall as a phone booth. Motorcycles aren't waterproof, and outboard wheels can be skirted and still very drag friendly. The Aptera proved that with excellent aerodynamics. That was a great ultralight subcompact that could handle high-speed cruising with its ultra aerodynamic body. A shame it never went to production with a small turbo diesel. You still get the benefit of a narrow car when it comes to wind resistance and parking, because you still leave plenty of space between the body of your car and the next vehicle's doors when you pull up front wheel to front wheel next to them. Heck, you could probably have your front wheels near touching and be A-OK.
          Ducman69
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian P
          But that's where you are wrong when it comes to most American cities. People have mostly moved out of the inner cities and into suburbs, and parallel parking is used almost nowhere. However, a narrow vehicle can fit into narrow parking spaces that are becoming more common better than a fat but short box. And living in the suburbs you are often taking the highway from say Sugar Land or Katy to Houston or Arlington to Dallas or Roundrock to Austin for work... at least that's literally how myself and all my current friends "roll". ;) You don't need a giant vehicle for that, but you also don't want a phone booth that is short, fat, and tall. Again not a BIGGER car, a different shaped car... less tall, less wide, longer, same interior capacity.
          Brian P
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian P
          How am I "wrong" when I said nothing about American cities whatsoever?? The word doesn't even appear in my post. With regards to the width, there is a problem making a car narrower than the current smart beyond just the side-by-side seating - and that is the relationship between center of gravity height and track width - think about roll-over stability. Make the car narrower, and it will tip over easier. It's likely that the width while maintaining acceptable seating positions and rollover stability is not reducible below what you see on smart, Japanese kei-class vehicles, etc. Unless you want to add a tonne of lead ballast (batteries) underneath the driver very close to the ground - and then have not much ground clearance for getting over kerbs or railroad tracks ... There is, of course, a class of vehicles that ARE narrow and with two-abreast seating that you can buy today ... a motorcycle! And it's not like you CAN'T drive a smart on the motorway ... it's perhaps not the optimum choice, but they'll do it.
          Brian P
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian P
          Counting its front wheels and wheel skirts, the Aptera was extremely wide. (and I did kinda dig that design, and it's too bad they couldn't make it - but narrow, it was not!)
      Street King
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hideous.
      Ele Truk
      • 1 Year Ago
      Stupid solution for added headroom. I wonder what the hump on top is really for?
        Ben Dover
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ele Truk
        The same thing the zebra stripes on the front are for. Ugh, I wish the government required an IQ test and permit to breed.
      Xperson27
      • 1 Year Ago
      What's up with the Renault logo?? Are we sure this is the Smart for Two???
        Xperson27
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Xperson27
        Reply, I read an article online.....well the majority of an article online..........my bad. delete delete delete
      EVnerdGene
      • 1 Year Ago
      could they make it uglier ? yes now it's xglier
        Koenigsegg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @EVnerdGene
        smarts are not ugly, especially the 2013's, you gonna say they are ugly but exotic car owners have them and think their awesome? idiot
      EHS Drives
      • 1 Year Ago
      This looks like a chopped Renault Twingo. The back hatch design on this spy shot looks the same as the current Twingo. Right down to the Renault logo. http://www.renault.fr/gamme-renault/vehicules-particuliers/twingo/twingo/galerie-media/
        EHS Drives
        • 1 Year Ago
        @EHS Drives
        Oops, didn't see that this thing was made up of Twingo parts. I didn't think that Daimler and Renault were partners in Smart since Renault didn't want anything to do with the original concept of the Swatch car now known as Smart.
      Grendal
      • 1 Year Ago
      It looks like a bulldog on wheels. Or a milk carton. I can't decide which.
      postpast
      • 1 Year Ago
      This car kind of made sense when it came out, but why on earth would you buy one of these today over a Fiat 500?
    • Load More Comments
    Share This Photo X