• Dec 10, 2009
2010 Nissan GT-R – Click above for high-res image gallery

Japan's Best Car magazine seems to be on a little bit of a hybrid high lately. Just a couple of weeks ago, the publication ran a story stating that Toyota is planning to revive its beloved MR2 nameplate with a new hybrid roadster. Now they're reporting that the Nissan GT-R will also gain a gas-electric drivetrain in its next iteration.

According to the report, the R36-generation GT-R will supplement its 440-horsepower gasoline engine – down from the current twin-turbo V6's 480 – with an electric motor worth about 160 galloping horses, for an overall equivalent of 600. That's a whole lot of power, and if the reports prove to be accurate, Porsche won't be the only one looking in the rear-view mirror when it comes along.

[Source: Best Car via 4WheelsNews.com]


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  • 39 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      On a side note...every time I see this car in person (about once a week) it amazes me how much better it looks in real life.
      • 5 Years Ago
      "That's a whole lot of power, and if the reports prove to be accurate, Porsche won't be the only one looking in the rear-view mirror when it comes along."

      So it is going to be slower than Porsche and many others?
      • 5 Years Ago
      Yay!!! More weight!

      ..Wait...

      This car is a tech-tour de force. It actually makes sense that it would gain hybrid characteristics.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Hybrid doesn't have to mean less performance. F1 cars with KERS are hybrids. Mclaren wasn't exactly going slow at the end of the season.

      A hybrid drivetrain doesn't necessarily make the GTR heavier either. What if they made the gasoline engine drivetrain RWD, and simply had an electric motor power the fronts. Don't need a transfer case anymore. Nor a driveshaft going back to the front. If they run a motor for each front wheel, don't need a center diff.
      • 5 Years Ago
      everyone missed the point. they are releasing a hybrid so it can launch off the electric motor and then move to the gas engine so they dont have every transmission grenade itself within 100 miles of it being off the lot! LOL. I'm jk I dont know why they would go hybrid on a high performance car I think they should just lighten it up and make it as good as the R34. for the most part i love nissan but I would buy a ZR1 any day over the R35
      • 5 Years Ago
      GT-R is gonna suck MORE balls?!
        • 5 Years Ago
        Nah, It gave up competing with you in that category.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Not sure I believe this but if it does make production it appears it will use the Infiniti Essence concepts drivetrain...which would make an impressive powerband....
      • 5 Years Ago
      i'd rather if they go full electric, and see what happens =)
      • 5 Years Ago
      I look forward to seeing what they come up with. The current car is extremely complicated, and Nissan have done a great job of tuning all the systems to work together and made a car that is very drivable and fast. I have faith that if they decide to stick some electric motors in there too, it'll work. I'd like to see them dabble with active suspension and aero too.
      • 5 Years Ago
      This is just a rumor.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Guys get serious. Really. Don't believe everything you read. The author of this article quotes a crappy unknown blog which in turn supposedly quotes Best Car which is full of BS anyway, creating stories that never turn out to be true. And just out of curiosity, did the author or one of Autoblogs four editor's read / translate the original article or did they just take the blogger's article for granted, because I can't find anything on the story.
      • 5 Years Ago
      no.

      make it stop. please. no more bastardizing cars with this hybrid bullsh*t
        • 5 Years Ago
        YOU ARE SO RIGHT, WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE AUTOMOTIVE WORLD? DOES IT HAVE TO DO WITH "CAFE" OR WHAT EVER IT'S CALLED? IS IT FOR THE PUBLIC BROWNIE POINTS OR IMAGE THEY WILL SCORE WITH THE PUBLIC? SOMEONE PLEASE ENLIGHTEN ME? I DON'T GET IT?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Of course I have no torque at 0rpm engine speed. My point was that engine (or motor) speed is meaningless. I can put down all the torque I want at 0 WHEEL rpm. Why does it matter that my engine is turning 1500rpm while somebody else's electric motor is turning 0rpm, both standing on the starting line? If we can both put down however much torque the tires can handle at that instant, we'll accelerate at the same rate. My drivetrain makes it completely unnecessary to ever operate at 0rpm, so torque at 0rpm is unimportant.

        Maybe it would help to make more sense if we look at an extreme example. Ever seen a top fuel dragster launch? They have 0 torque at 0rpm engine speed too. Does it look like they're hurting for torque at low vehicle speeds? Would more torque help at that point? No, more torque would just overpower the tires. Thus a conventional drivetrain is perfectly capable of working around this no torque at 0rpm engine speed issue.
        • 5 Years Ago
        M, your gasoline engine idles somewhere between 500 and 800 rpm. At 0 rpm, it's... well... off.

        Also, when a car spins its wheels off the line, it is because the engine's torque was sufficient to break traction and rev freely. The car may be at a standstill, but during a full-throttle burnout, the engine is usually bouncing off the rev limiter.

        An electric motor really does provide an abnormal amount of "oomph" off the line. Drive one and you'll see.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Solid point, PJ. I could see arguments either way on whether that everyday driving difference is relevant on the GT-R.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Not all hybrids are Prius like, in Nissan's case they will probably use it to increase performance. They do not care about MPGs for this car, it sells in such small numbers that its effect on Nissan's CAFE is almost non existent.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Apparently you don't like oodles of torque from 0 RPM. You name implies you are stuck in the early 90s.
        • 5 Years Ago
        if ANYONE can make a great car that is also a Hybrid (asides Ferrari) it´s Nissan. The´re proven wizzards in car tunning and as the current GTR generation have demonstrated to us all, The CAN make an overweigh car obsenely fast, so the hybrid powertrain shoudn´t be a problem as for that.
        It certainly will be an overcomplicated little beast, but then again, that´s the japanese way... And some extra 160hp with fuel economy are always welcome.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Lexus LS and GS use hybrid powertrain to gain HP not to get more MPG. Nissan is going to use it to get a faster GT-R. I think they know how not to sacrifice performance in hybrid powertrain.
        • 5 Years Ago
        wow... what a confused bunch of readers! you Autoblog'ers are quite the interesting bunch.

        someone gets virtually 0 stars for supporting hybrids and the next post supporting hybrids gets 3 stars. then there's one against hybrids with 3 stars and the reply to it is for hybrids with 3 stars lol

        judging by the comments people really don't know much about this hybrid tech anyways and what the advantages are of advances in this technology.

        btw, "m"... your whole explaination about torque at 0 rpm and clutch slipping is completely wrong. how can you have ANY torque or hp when the engine isn't even started?!?... rookie..
        • 5 Years Ago
        m, I got the wrong impression from the line, "my current, gasoline engine, direct drive car already has oodles of torque from 0rpm."

        In any case, I still think you'll find electric-motor-assisted cars to have a uniquely powerful feel from a stop in routine driving. Dragsters launch by holding the engine at the high-rpm power peak and dumping the clutch to break the tires loose. Which is very different from the feeling you get when you accelerate normally from idle.

        You may have sufficient power to break the wheels loose at 0 wheel rpm, but the split-second delay between raising engine rpm and wheel rpm are sufficient to create a distinct seat-of-the-pants difference between cars with 0-rpm-and-up electric assist and those without.
        • 5 Years Ago
        *Your
        • 5 Years Ago
        Dude, who the f*** cares!? You know Nissan is going to make the R36 better performing on the track (and off) than the R35.

        Even Ferrari is thinking about hybrids, what's it to you? Too stubborn to embrace new tech??
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