• Jul 30, 2009
Click above to watch video after the jump

Right now the crew at General Motors' pre-production operations center at the Warren Technical Center is in the midst of building 75 Chevy Volt IVER prototypes. IVERs, or integration vehicle engineering release prototypes, are the last stage of prototypes prior to pilot builds. For these IVER builds, pretty much all of the production intent parts and systems are in place and the intent of the build process is to evaluate final assembly processes. The cars are all built by hand, but the technicians and engineers are testing the build sequence as it will be done on the line to make sure everything actually goes together.

As always, the first stage of final assembly is the body shop. The video after the jump shows stampings that for the Volt that are assembled on jigs and then welded by hand before the complete body is painted. GM will apparently be releasing a series of videos documenting the complete build process, so stay tuned. Check out the first one after the jump.

[Source: General Motors]



I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      We all have a lot of biases here in the peanut gallery / dungeon that lurks beneath the posts, myself included.

      Those who have been posting here a long time probably remember a lot of shoot-from-the-hip posts that I fired off in fits of rage, only to be flamed and/or corrected (rightly so I might add). I've gone from being a complete import fanboy to a pretty open-minded enthusiast, mostly thanks to my fellow posters making solid points that made me think. I also have to thank Grassroots Motorsports as well for teaching me that just about ANY car can be cool in its own way.

      My point is, I don't think this is the ideal vehicle for many of us here in the stacks, but it very well could be for a lot of people. GM has done a lot of hard work to get the Volt where it is today, and I'm pretty excited about it (even if I never own one), and here's why:

      A) Even if this vehicle is a total flop and loses GM money there are still benefits to GM as a whole that might be intangible to consumers for a while. Such as getting people at every level of design and production motivated and focused and willing to take responsibility and dedicating themselves to getting the most out of the vehicle at its intended price. I see the people in these videos and they look enthusiastic, which for GM designers/engineers that have been stuck working on vanilla sedans and other rolling appliances for a decade or more is HUGE.

      B) If the Volt is marginally successful it makes me really excited to think about how good Volt 2.0 could be. I bleed motor oil, but I don't care what propels my car as long as I can carve some cones with it on Sunday morning. Sure, the first iteration will have problems, and I bet the automotive press is chomping at the bit to nitpick every little flaw they can find, but I have faith that GM will learn and adapt quickly, because they can't afford NOT to. The domestics realize they can't barf up a crap product anymore and not touch it for its life cycle. Look at how much Ford has learned about constantly improving their products each year. I'm sure Chevy will be listening very intently to what the press and consumers have to say about this car and I expect to see a lot of improvements during the second model-year.

      My fellow posters, sometimes you guys make me laugh until I cry, and sometimes you make me so mad I have to turn off the monitor and walk away. I used to hate the domestics, but dammit I have faith in my fellow Americans to adapt to the realities of the 21st century and produce a great car, and that everyone involved in the production of that car will take that positive energy and apply it to all of their projects. At the very least the Volt could fail, but I think it will still energize GM and get the engineers having a bigger say in what the company produces.
        • 5 Years Ago
        "I've gone from being a complete import fanboy to a pretty open-minded enthusiast, mostly thanks to my fellow posters making solid points that made me think. "

        Dang.

        One of the best posts on AB I have read in a long time. Nice job Cameron.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Typo: ...... especially since it hasn't exactly been a cash cow for Toyota.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Trains have been using series hybrid style drive trains for fifty or so years now. A series hybrid makes sense for people who have the right kind of commute. As long as your commute is 40 miles or less round trip or a little more and you have a spot to plug in your car at work you should use almost no fuel during the week.

      I spent all last weekend driving a Prius and you couldn't get me out of that thing fast enough. Some of the most uncomfortable seats I have ever sat in and very loud. Also the feeling that anytime you had to take a corner at speed the car would flop on its side does not inspire confidence.

      I guess if your commute is all low speed stop and go city driving it is fine but otherwise that car is hell.

      • 5 Years Ago
      Like the new Camaro, by the time this thing is actually produced, we'll already be tired of looking at it. We've been looking at prototypes for... how many years now?
        • 5 Years Ago
        That's GMs new thing....show you the damn car for 5 years before they actually build it.

        It seems like the Volt is will have the same ungodly long gestation period as the Camaro; but at least unlike the Camaro it is an entirely new vwehicle and not a simple rebody of a Holden... ;->>
        • 5 Years Ago
        yeah, because the Camaro is selling so poorly.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Show me a two door Holden with the Camaro's wheelbase. ALL car companies SHARE platforms & components within their corporate stable.

        Toyota does it
        Honda does it.
        VW does it. Heck VAG made seven cars off the previous Golf/TT/A3 platform.
      • 5 Years Ago
      GM makes an Edsel . . . so what is new?
        • 5 Years Ago
        At a time when GM is on life support, to waste money, time, talent and resources on a "lollypop" like the Volt, is criminal. The car will not sell, will not attract people with money into a GM showroom, it is just a management ego trip at the taxpayer expense.

        No more bail-out money for these clowns. They waste it !
        • 5 Years Ago
        Mr. Cobb: Don't let the facts get in your in the way of your rant.

        FACT: The VOLT was at least 3 years into its development before GM took a penny of the bail-out that you are crying about. Was it rational to spend all of that money developing this car, and then killing it? Just because you lack the vision to see what this could to?

        FACT: Diesel-electric trains have been proven to be one of the most efficient modes of transportation. The Volt is GM take of that technology, add the battery.

        Where I think the world misses, is that 18 wheelers do not employ this technology. This PROVEN technology should not be wasted on sub-compact cars, it should be deployed in the trucking industry.
      Pablo
      • 5 Years Ago
      Boring....short...
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Pablo
        Usually people complain about boring things as being too long. I'm not sure if I've ever heard someone say that something they thought boring was too short.

        I think the series is a very interesting look into the process of getting an assembly line running. I'm familiar with installing textile machinery into mills, but in the auto industry it is much more complicated to integrate all the production machinery.
        Pablo
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Pablo
        I suppose I meant to say it was too short to capture my interest...I will clarify next time I suppose...
      • 5 Years Ago
      Don't feed the trolls!
      • 5 Years Ago
      The only thing holding me back is the constant changes to the Volt. The rear center council still looks cheap, but my current issue is the battery plug in the front of the car. Does it have to be a round portal? I would have liked it if it was square, so it would not be confused with the fuel door in the back. Or lets be bold and ask GM engineers, didn't you know the US regulations had a standard plug, when you had designed that fancy plug behind the name plate? That would have saved money on developmental cost.
      • 5 Years Ago
      They want to sell the Volt for 40K right? ok so the batteries are worth 16K the body and components are worth 15K that means they going to make 9K profit on each car?? not bad if you ask me...That's usually the profit margin on the trucks and large SUVs....
        • 5 Years Ago
        First, battery doesn't cost nearly 16k-- But, the battery, the electric motor, the generator, the control electronics, all add up. I think I figured it's about 15k in additional parts on top of the cost of a Cruze, minus the cost of a transmission.

        Then again, while 40k has been mentioned, the final price isn't known by anyone yet.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Where did you get your numbers regarding the Volt's battery and production costs?

        GM has generally acknowledged that the Volt will be sold close to or just under its actual production costs - meaning they aren't expecting to make much profit initially. They're hoping that as production numbers increase, the costs will go down, and that they will eventually be able to lower the actual purchase price within a few years.

        Pretty much the same way Toyota initially had to subsidize the price of the Prius, so it's not too unusual...
      • 5 Years Ago
      Cool! I toured the Fairfax, KS plant back in high school for an internship interview. It's absolutely amazing to see how much technology goes into making a car. I was really impressed by the cleanliness in the Volt video. It's also cool that Government Motors is giving some insight to what they're doing, especially since I think most people that hold opinions about GM don't know the first thing about engineering or cars in general.
    • Load More Comments