You don't have to be German to test your car at the Nürburging. You just have to be serious about beating the Germans on their own home turf. That's why Nissan tests its GT-R at the Nordschleife to challenge the Porsche 911, and why Cadillac – which is no less serious about putting up a fight to German performance sedans – has returned to the 'Ring once again with its latest.

This time it's the turn of the new CTS Vsport, the sportier version of Cadillac's new mid-range sedan that aims to bridge the gap until the arrival of the next CTS-V. So how'd it fare? At the end of what we're sure was an exhaustive test session, the new CTS Vsport clocked a time of 8:14.10.

To put that into context, General Motors points out that the time places the new sedan six seconds ahead of the first-gen CTS-V, whose 400-horsepower V8 engine was actually less potent than the Vsport's new 410hp 3.6-liter twin-turbo V6. That's still a good fifteen seconds slower than the outgoing CTS-V that clocked a 7:59 in 2009 with its 556hp supercharged V8, but only a second behind the E60-generation BMW M5 with its high-revving 500hp V10.

That's mighty impressive indeed, and we can't wait to see what the next CTS-V can manage. The four-door crown currently belongs to the Porsche Panamera Turbo S that set a 7:52.20 in 2011. Just sayin'. Scope out the video clip and press release below.

Show full PR text
ALL-NEW CADILLAC CTS DRIVES CHALLENGING NÜRBURGRING
Vsport model records lap time of 8:14.10 at world's most-demanding test track


DETROIT – Cadillac validated its all-new 2014 CTS midsize luxury sedan and power-packed CTS Vsport at the world's most-demanding test track – Germany's Nürburgring – and recorded lap times to enhance the nameplate's reputation as a driver's car.

Notably, the 2014 CTS Vsport, featuring Cadillac's first Twin-Turbo engine and eight-speed transmission, recorded a lap time of 8:14.10, almost six seconds faster than the first generation CTS-V recorded 10 years ago with a larger V-8 engine.

Nürburgring validation certified that all CTS suspension packages are capable of handling the extreme conditions and unlimited speeds of Autobahn driving. CTS development included Autobahn and track calibrations of the steering system, shock absorbers, chassis controls and powertrain cooling.

"The Nürburgring's extreme conditions allow us to push cars to the limits of stability, steering, braking, ride and handling," said Dave Leone, CTS executive chief engineer, Performance Luxury Vehicles. "The new CTS models had a lot to live up to considering the nameplate's history of outstanding performance, and we were not disappointed."

Measuring 12.9 miles (20.8 km) and including some 154 turns, the Nürburgring's Nordschleife ("north loop") is widely considered the world's most-demanding course for vehicle validation. Cadillac vehicle dynamics performance engineer Kevin Zelenka and Jeff Grabowski drove full production models of CTS and CTS Vsport with no performance modifications, validating all-new 2014 CTS sedan that goes on sale this fall.

"The new CTS was an absolute riot to drive on the Ring," said Zelenka. "It's more athletic and refined, and the Vsport proved extremely capable. If a car performs well on the Ring, it will perform well on any road in the world."

The CTS has been the centerpiece of Cadillac's portfolio for more than a decade. The third-generation CTS is one inch lower, five inches longer and more than 200 pounds lighter than its predecessor. The new car also has lower curb weight, greater structural stiffness and more horsepower than its primary competitors.

The all-new CTS is engineered from the ground up to deliver a driving experience that combines sport-tuned handling with world-class comfort. Its segment-exclusive Magnetic Ride Control and electronic limited slip differential constantly monitor rear-wheel rotation to ensure optimal handling in a variety of road conditions.

The 2014 CTS standard model will start at $46,025, including $925 destination. Three collections of option packages – Luxury, Performance and Premium – will be offered with either the 2.0T turbocharged four cylinder or 3.6L naturally aspirated V6 engine in either rear- or all-wheel drive. The CTS Vsport model starts at $59,995, including $925 destination, and features the new Cadillac Twin-Turbo 3.6L V6 (420 hp) in RWD only with an eight-speed transmission.

About Cadillac
Cadillac has been a leading luxury auto brand since 1902. Today Cadillac is growing globally, driven by an expanding product portfolio featuring dramatic design and technology. More information on Cadillac appears at www.cadillac.com. Cadillac's media website with information, images and video can be found at media.cadillac.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 114 Comments
      Christopher Smith
      • 1 Year Ago
      Any Nurburgring time over 8 minutes I wouldn't crow about by putting out a press release. Get that time under 8 minutes, then talk.
        Hazdaz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Christopher Smith
        Oh boy... looks like we got a Mario Andretti in the comment section today.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Hazdaz
          [blocked]
          Justin Campanale
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Hazdaz
          Good catch. I was thinking that his Facebook picture looked familiar.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Hazdaz
          [blocked]
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Hazdaz
          [blocked]
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Christopher Smith
        [blocked]
      nocommie11
      • 1 Year Ago
      I knew GM will fuglify this car once it went to production.
        mazeroni
        • 1 Year Ago
        @nocommie11
        When did they show a non-production version of the car?
      Hazdaz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Suck it, BMW. love, America
        Justin Campanale
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Hazdaz
        I'm going to agree, as a former BMW fanboy. BMW's latest cars have no soul whatsoever. I wouldn't be surprised if this new Cadillac (which would have been considered an old man's car just 5 years ago) outperforms the 5 series in handling, acceleration, and driving dynamics. The Infiniti M56/Q70/whatever and the Audi A6/S6 already do, and the Jag XF and the Lexus GS are catching up.
      Michael
      • 1 Year Ago
      It does not photograph well. There are very few flattering angles to that car.
        Judah Richardson
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Michael
        The CTS Mafia on AB is pretty strong, but fortunately there are people like me who agree with you. The car does not look athletic from any angle except from the front.
          davebo357
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Judah Richardson
          Michael Phelps isn't much of a looker either but he sure gets the job done.
        Jonathan Wayne
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Michael
        I have seen the new CTS on the highway a couple of times now and it looks terrible. The ATS and XTS look good but the CTS is not attractive. The front has way too much going on, that long continuous LED strip is ugly and distracting. The side is bland and the back looks very small and plain, like it was designed by someone else.
          Jerry
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Jonathan Wayne
          Sadly, I agree with you. Saw one in town two days ago. Did a double take because it was something I had not seen in person, but my stomach sank in disappointment after I realized what it was. It looked so good in the press pictures, but in person, oh man...
      jawnath1n
      • 1 Year Ago
      Despite owning a vehicle with one of the most competitive times around Nurburgring, I find that Nurburgring lap times are just plain dumb. Only good for e-penis internet bragging rights. There is more to a car than it's lap time around a track 99% of the owners will never visit, yet alone even drive on.
        Armon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jawnath1n
        There is definitely more to a street car than its lap times - I don't think anyone could argue that. But it's still an interesting and important point of comparison (among many).
          jawnath1n
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Armon
          @WJK If its such a stupid question, then instead of ignoring it completely why don't you prove your point and just answer it? Please, do tell us why its important that we know how quickly a CTS can go around a race track in Germany. Or is it because you can't and it isn't important or is it because the real answer validates the point I'm making? These lap times are only good for internet bragging rights. Plain and simple.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Armon
          [blocked]
          jawnath1n
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Armon
          I hear what you're saying, but while you say its important, I don't think it is as important as people have made it out to be. Why is it important that a CTS can do the Nurburgring in 8:14? Who exactly is going to take out a CTS to Germany or to any race track?
        Todd Fleming
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jawnath1n
        jaw I gotta say your wrong here, it doesnt HAVE to be the ring, but one consistent track that makers go to for testing is important because it's the benchmark of how that car will drive compared to others. Yes the actual time is bragging rights, but for car peeps like us, it's hugely important for understanding that the car can go fast and not just in a straight line. I suggest you spend some time at a track with your car or bike and report back. I can almost guarantee your tune will change.
          Mondrell
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Todd Fleming
          \"3.) What the car does on the Nurburgring has no bearing on how it drives or feels when driven on the road, which is far more important. I\'d take the better driving car over the fastest car, every time.\" The man does have a great point here. As the popularity of Nurburgring testing boomed, I remember reading about several cars that despite performing well there, were too crashy, high-strung, or clinical to be enjoyed by John Q. Public at legal speeds. The British motoring press in particular really developed an axe to grind over this, as many of these \'Ring-centric athletes rode too much like oxcarts on the open road.
          jawnath1n
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Todd Fleming
          1.) I have several highly regarded raceways in my area, in which I've done HPDEs in all but one, only because I'm not registered in the club that has exclusive access to it. I'm very familiar with track days. 2.) Again, one of my cars is among the quickest recorded lap times at the Ring, and I still think its a dumb measurement. A car is more than just about how fast it can go around a race track, otherwise there would be no other car worth buying besides a Viper ACR. 3.) What the car does on the Nurburgring has no bearing on how it drives or feels when driven on the road, which is far more important. I'd take the better driving car over the fastest car, every time.
        Jonathan Wayne
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jawnath1n
        Seriously, it is the most worthless thing ever. I am surprised Porsche does not have it as an option. For $5,000 we will give you a certificate and a sticker that says "Nurburgring Approved and Tested".
          jawnath1n
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Jonathan Wayne
          I think you just gave them an idea on how to squeeze out even more money from their buyers. A dash mounted plaque (so everyone can see it) with it's lap time will surely be a big seller.
        jawnath1n
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jawnath1n
        @domingorobusto I think you've just help validate the point I'm making. As you say, people won't use this performance or ever have a 'track battle' with a competitor. But despite that, they still want to know, to use a measuring stick. So sure, lets go with that. If they aren't going to actually use the performance of the vehicle, then what exactly is that measuring stick good for? Oh yeah, internet bragging rights. Which is what I said it was only good for in my original post.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      muspod
      • 1 Year Ago
      Lets see how reliable their experiment is...
        muspod
        • 1 Year Ago
        @muspod
        What?... GM fan boys don't like that??? I think we all know how this is going to turn out..
          gtv4rudy
          • 1 Year Ago
          @muspod
          What a surprise when GM fans get their backs up for a little criticism. Sorry but this imitation of a BMW 3 series doesn't cut it.
          Rob
          • 1 Year Ago
          @muspod
          Looks like you logged in with your 10 other accounts to down vote yourself
      over9000
      • 1 Year Ago
      That looks so bland.
      Bernard
      • 1 Year Ago
      How does a 535i stack up? *Read's article* "only a second behind the E60-generation BMW M5" Oh, nevermind! ;-P
      Judah Richardson
      • 1 Year Ago
      Impressive numbers, but the car in the video looks terribly ungainly.
      ChrisJC
      • 1 Year Ago
      Well, right off the bat the E60 M5's sedan was done with a street version M5, called an auto sport test with street tires and no cage. Right off the dealer lot. This Cadillac was "Calibrated to handle the Ring" and there is absolutely no mention of the tires, a huge factor, as they were either R compound or high performance tires. This thing is also stripped out and has a cage! A HUGE ADVANTAGE in lap times. You lighten the car, throw a cage in it which makes it way more rigid and then put R compound or other high performance tires on it that will no doubt not be on the ones on the dealer lot, and you will get a fast lap time. No mention of driver and experience level too. Comparing the stripped/caged/and high performance tires(possibly R compound) equipped on this track modded sedan to the one on the lot will no doubt turn in way different lap times. All of this stuff was conveniently left out. There should be full disclosure about this stuff as it is obviously modded for the track...and that's just the stuff you can see.
        normc32
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ChrisJC
        You are going to eat your words. In 2009 the CTS-V broke 8 minute mark with safety equipment like a roll cage on DOT street tires. Which would have the equivalent weight of hauling another person. This isn't Nissan testing an under powered GT-R with racing slicks.
          buckfeverjohnson
          • 1 Year Ago
          @normc32
          Well said norm. http://www.autoblog.com/2010/06/23/breaking-toyota-chief-test-driver-dies-lf-a-germany-ring/
          NissanGTR
          • 1 Year Ago
          @normc32
          Correction moron. The GTR uses sports tires.
        Tim Dwighter
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ChrisJC
        Striped out? If anything they add weight with the roll cage...they don't take anything out. They use a stock car, put a roll cage in it, and change the tires. Nothing else is done or removed.
        techie69
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ChrisJC
        Which shows Caddy at best will only play second fiddle to the Ultimate Driving Machine.
      Eta Carinae
      • 1 Year Ago
      Can't wait to see the V treatment on the ATS and CTS.......last gen CTS was a beauty especially in coupe form.....so I know cadillac will deliver..........oh, and let the german snobs complain.......we will see them in our rear view mirrors.
        Street King
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Eta Carinae
        The ATS-V is going to own the M3 in every category imaginable, and be $20,000 cheaper. Your time has come, BMW.
          The Skwid
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Street King
          Street King - I drive GM vehicles but your statement is ridiculous. The ATS has a great chassis, but is riddled with glaring problems in almost every other category. The M3 won't have an issue maintaining its dominance over Cadillac.
          gtv4rudy
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Street King
          Going to own? haaha, oh please. Only if GM buys BMW,... like that's going to happen.
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