Speaking to the effectiveness of ingenuity and improvisation, the string-pull windshield wipers in this Russian Lada work surprisingly well in the snow and the rainy weather. We wouldn't recommend practicing this MacGyver-like move unless it's absolutely necessary, but then again, there can't be too many Ladas in the US.

So what's all the jesting about? We're told the car's occupants are joking about hand-wiper jobs, and the driver is cautioning the passenger not to rip the rope. That leads us to the tip of the day: remember to keep the wiping motion nice and slow to preserve the string. Watch the video below to see the strung-up wipers in action.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 21 Comments
      SquareFour
      • 1 Year Ago
      A couple of winters ago, the nut connecting the wiper's actuator arm to the motor spun off (I didn't know this at the time. All I knew was that my wipers stopped working) and I had to make it home during a snowstorm with my arm wrapped around the a-pillar manually pushing and pulling the wiper. What I wouldn't have given for a length of string.
        Dfelix70
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SquareFour
        Exactly how long are your arms???
          SquareFour
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dfelix70
          I know you're being generically facetious, but I'll answer anyway, even though others have done something similar before. It was a small car, a Mitsu Mirage, with the drivers wiper near enough to the driver's a pillar to reach. I had to drive with the window down, seat all the way forward and hunched up against the steering wheel to manage this. Since both wipers are connected, it was just a matter of moving the driver's wiper back and forth enough to clear a patch enough to see. I wasn't taking the wipers through their entire range of motion, just 6 inches or so directly in my field of vision. It was a horrible experience I don't recommend. The only reason I attempted it was because I was already on the freeway when the wipers stopped working, traffic was light and I was an exit away from home.
      Dan
      • 1 Year Ago
      I had to do that with a 1982 Camaro during a snowstorm in Denver. Drove 18 miles with one hand on the wheel, the other hand on the laces of my boots moving back and forth to clear the snow. Worked just fine for one trip. Next morning I replaced the motor and the switch. Never want to do that again!
      Andy
      • 1 Year Ago
      We did the same thing way back in the late 50s w my buddy's '47 Ford custom.
      ANDREW
      • 1 Year Ago
      wastin away again in vladimir putinville
      56Jalopy
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have actually done that, many years ago. My first vehicle had a hand crank to move the one wiper it had.
      See_York_Chin
      • 1 Year Ago
      You can not defeat that country.
      Wütend Kolben
      In Soviet Russia, string wipes you!
        ACURA23CL
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Wütend Kolben
        You beat me to it! As soon as I watched that video, I clicked other to the comments to write that, but first wanted to check if anyone beat me. Kudos to you, Sir.
      kmdk78
      • 1 Year Ago
      If you ever owned a British Leyland product this was standard operating procedure along with an in car fire extinguisher for those wonderful Lucas electrics.
        SquareFour
        • 1 Year Ago
        @kmdk78
        Ain't that the truth. When I bought a Triumph Spitfire, I asked my pop for advice on where I should start working on it first. He said, "First? First you should return it where you found it. If that doesn't work, just leave the electrical system alone so it'll catch fire--and it will--and burn to the ground. If you really want to go broke, find replacement, non-Lucas, electrical parts and rewire everything. Then you can move on to the rot and the rust and the carbs and the worn rings and...." on and on and on.
          kmdk78
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SquareFour
          I purchased a 1968 Triumph TR 250 in 1972 and when I brought it home I thought my father would die of laughter. It was all bondo and eventually the dashboard caught fire on the passenger side with my kid brother in the seat. It was a fleeting romance.
          David
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SquareFour
          My favorite British car bumper sticker "The parts falling off this car are of the finest British Quality"
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      DKano
      • 1 Year Ago
      The things you'd do when you need another bottle of vodka!
      bK
      • 1 Year Ago
      Only in mother russia...
      carnut122
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think that's standard equipment on all Ladas.
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