Wards Auto has released its North American Light Vehicle Production Forecast for 2014, and the report predicts foreign manufacturers will increase production on the continent some 3.9 percent by 2014. If accurate, that should see 123,000 additional cars, trucks and vans produced in North America, swelling the total number of units produced both by domestic and foreign manufacturers to 16.9 million light vehicles from a projected 15.6 million in 2013. Much of the increase can be attributed to the fact that Toyota intends to produce another car at its Blue Springs, MS plant as well as a new Lexus model at its Georgetown, KY facility in a year's time.

Likewise, Volkswagen intends to move production of a currently imported model to its plant in Puebla, Mexico. Daimler, Honda, Nissan and Mazda also plan to build additional models on North American soil for the first time. Around two-thirds of the new North American manufacturing will take place in Mexico, helping the country soak up a full 20 percent of the content's automotive production for the first time. You can head over to the Wards Auto site for the full report.


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  • 36 Comments
      Patrick
      • 2 Years Ago
      I think the political comments here are a stretch. Even the jobs created at non UAW plants in the States may create union jobs at any of a number of suppliers. Everybody wins, nobody in North America should be mad. The only people that might complain are German and Japanese workers who are "having their jobs stolen" by those cheap Americans and Mexicans...these things come in cycles, and so much depends on Foreign Exchange rates, that maybe everybody should focus just a bit more on getting as much education and being as productive as possible, instead of blaming the Other/UAW/ Non UAW /Mexican/Japanese/Korean/Chinese worker.
      richard
      • 2 Years Ago
      As long as Americans support these non-union plants, what`s left of a middle class standard of living will continue to deteriorate.
        Scr
        • 2 Years Ago
        @richard
        Yea. Right. I think tens if not hundreds of thousands of middle class non-union autoworkers across the southeast and in some former rustbelt states would heartily disagree with you there. They have good paying jobs at a manufacturer that cares about their input, they don't have to pay extortion money (Union dues), don't have to tolerate their fellow employees slacking off and getting drunk at work and making the same pay as they do and THEN getting promoted over them, and don't have to put up with the us vs. them attitude. Its all US. Tool.
          Patrick
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Scr
          I grew up in a household of a white-collar worker at a Big 3, was "meh" about the UAW. However, I think there will always be a need for Unions and the UAW, because it will always be good to have a balance between Union and Non-Union plants. Even non-union plant workers benefit from the mere existence of the UAW, because management knows if they don't treat their workers justly, they risk a unionization drive. Same thing the other way around really, the UAW has to really pick up its game and return value on the dollar both to manufacturers AND their dues paying members.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Scr
          [blocked]
      Ducman69
      • 2 Years Ago
      Made in America with American parts suppliers and -NO- U.A.W? Yes, please!
        RetrogradE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        You beat me to it! I feel strongly that foreign car companies will keep building more models here if they can avoid the black hole we call the UAW.
        boardin85
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        You must have missed the part of the article that said 2/3 of this new production will be in MEXICO. The article is about North American production, not USA production.
      xspeedy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Since when was Mexico lumped into "North America"?
        Healthy Chap
        • 2 Years Ago
        @xspeedy
        Since you failed geography class. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_Free_Trade_Agreement
          lordedardstark1
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Healthy Chap
          He's just kidding; no one's that dumb.
          S.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Healthy Chap
          I've learned to stop underestimating the stupidity of the average person
        Ducman69
        • 2 Years Ago
        @xspeedy
        Hasn't Mexico unofficially annexed Texas and Arizona? They have an interesting non-violent invasion strategy though, so we build walls but feel guilty shooting them.
          Patrick
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ducman69
          You've got a good sense of humor, so pardon me if I take a stab at your comment. You view illegals as "an invasion force" rather than economic/violence refugees? Should they be shot? Yes I know it's not the same, but should East Germans that hopped the Berlin wall have been shot? As far as Hispanics that cross the border in search of a better life go, it sure as hell is wrong that they break the law, but they are just doing what my German ancestors did, but then again, all my German ancestors had to do is hop on a boat. It's a lot harder now, and if you are Mexican you can't even apply for the visa lottery. Anyways, if manufacturers keep investing in the US AND Mexico, there will be a lot less of those types of illegals (and in fact the net flow of immigration in the last few years from Mexico has been negative). Unless you are a Navajo, Seminole or Cherokee, I'd judge...but not too harshly. As far as Mexicans who cross over to escape the violence goes, well, a whole heck of a lot of it comes from Calderón having decided once and for all to try and squash the Cartels...which mostly exist to feed the rabid demand of American addicts and casual drug users. Writing your congressman for modernized drug laws, or volunteering at your local DARE program would help decrease that. Anyways, every manufacturing job in Mexico is one less potential illegal, probably one more job at an American supplier (many Mexican plants just ASSEMBLE), and one more future consumer of Washington Apples, Midwestern Beef, Dell Computers, and maaaaybe one day an F-150. At least that's my two cents.
      M5_4_life
      • 2 Years Ago
      For the Tea partiers or some folks, this will be bad news...
        AngeloD
        • 2 Years Ago
        @M5_4_life
        Wat? The Tea Party got its start in the public outrage over the bailouts of the Wall Street Banks and GM and Chrysler. The Tea Party was all in favor of letting GM and Chrysler fold. They were of the opinion the foreign manufacturers would increase production here to take up the slack.
        Ducman69
        • 2 Years Ago
        @M5_4_life
        Uhm, I'm a libertarian, so I suppose a "Tea Partier", and this is great news. It gives Americans the options to support domestic industries without supporting the unions. Its the Democrats that are likely pissed off by this.
          Patrick
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ducman69
          I don't think tooo many Democrats will be pissed off. Much of the narrative for the last few years from the right has been that the economy hasn't picked up because the "socialistic" approach of Democrats has dragged down the economy. Never mind that the "socialist" Obama has been become a free trader who signed the largest free trade agreement since NAFTA (Korea), that he inherited the GM bailout, and that he facilitated the market solution to Chrysler (selling it to FIAT). Thing is, while most economist will agree that the government has a long term debt problem, there is real debate about the short term. If you were really seeing government spending crowding out the private sector, you'd see wage push inflation, skyrocketing interest rates on gov. debt, and companies scrounging for liquidity. But you don't see that. Inflation is ultra tame, energy prices are dropping, the interest rate on T-bills is below inflation (people are throwing money at Uncle Sam), and the 10K filings of companies show they are sitting on piles of cash and simply squeezing more productivity out of their workforce. News like this makes it hard to paint a picture that the US is becoming Venezuela, and makes it seem more and more like the US is turning the corner.
        dej
        • 2 Years Ago
        @M5_4_life
        I'll bite. Why? I would think Democrats and unions would be the unhappy ones.
      parthenon1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well UAW, see the handwriting on the wall? Your exhorbent salaries and benefits will either go down to the levels of the foreign makes American assembly plants or either GM, Chrysler and Ford will disappear from the scene or at least the UAW will go and then American brands can compete. Once Obama is gone you wont be able to black jack the American public with those $58.00 plus hourly wages (paid even for low skill jobs) and keep the companies in business. I no longer buy GM vehicles I buy Korean, Japanese and maybe even German makes from now on.
        calderasf
        • 2 Years Ago
        @parthenon1
        Yep, angry people like you cause others make a living and can own a house and send kids to college bad union members.
      KAG
      • 2 Years Ago
      It has been over three decades with European and Japanese brands making cars in the USA, and now Korean brands are building cars here. With most of the American brands being built in Canada and Mexico for a couple decades there should be new definitions for Domestic American cars.
        Ducman69
        • 2 Years Ago
        @KAG
        And to make things even more confusing, even the engineering and management work is not always in the "home" country anymore, as these are all multinational corporations now. Ford of Europe operates quite independently, and has their own design engineers, management, parts network, etc. My brother is an engineer working for Mercedes in Alabama for example. Cars.com actually has a formula they use to determine how "American" a vehicle actually is. Ironically, the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord are currently ranked highest on their American list, with >80% of the parts from the vehicle made right here in America with final assembly here as well. If only it weren't for the UAW, the United States would make an ideal manufacturing base for North and South America since we have a stable government, first rate infrastructure, great shipping ports, plenty of rail, tons of raw materials, and for the most part a stable currency and it would greatly reduce the shipping expense with rising energy prices (the main reason all the vehicles aren't just made in one place in S.Korea or China and shipped across the globe).
      mikeeeemikek
      • 2 Years Ago
      Gee. Nothing going to Michigan!!!!!!!!!! With all the unemployed skilled union auto workers you would have thunk they would at least build one plant there. TELL YOU SOMETHING
      AngeloD
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good news. The more foreign competition based in the US the better. The D3 are forced to produce a better product, and if they fail, there's less of an argument for another bailout.
      Duane
      • 2 Years Ago
      its a fact that for years GM and Ford have more factories in Mexico and Canada combined than in the US. Sadly that the truth. Honda Odyssey was design, built and tested here in the USA. Only the brand is Japanese. Most of the Suppliers are American companies. As long as the UAW wont play thier bully role then this trend will go on.... in the end its the jobs it create that matters....
      bassmaster7773
      • 2 Years Ago
      PARTHENON1,,,, where do you get your information from ???? you are sooo ignorant,, and jealous of envious jobs of the uaw auto workers,,,, that dont make half of what you claim,,,,get your facts straight before you try to show the public how gulliable you american back stabbers,,,of peoples occupations and our livelyhoods,,,, for your general information,,,, toyota and the canadian workers get highers wages than the u. s. workers,,,, which is about 1/2 of the wages you claim,,,, its people like you and the disgusting media ,, that bad mouth all american workers,,, and try to claim,,, everything foreign is better than made here,,,, ,, thats why our jobs are going over seas,,, you dont support your fellow countrymen,,,, i will not contract any work done around my house,,by anyone appling for work,,, driving a foreign vechile,,,, merry Christmas,,,,
        kate
        • 2 Years Ago
        @bassmaster7773
        I would imagine....that the hourly he is quoting....includes benefits. Is has been noted....in the media....$1500 of each car can be traced to the hourly and....benefits of each worker. These jobs....are too specific. If workers....are laid off or fired....they cannot easily move to a comparable....position at another company...like, say, a graphic designer....can move from company....to....company, so their training (assembly)....is nearly useless. Not envious....of autoworkers. Industry is too....volatile....risky....precarious....propped up....subsidized.......etc.
      fredbertshopping
      • 2 Years Ago
      Does the person writing this column not understand that more foreign prduction here will cut into GM and Ford production (Chrysler is foreign owned, does't count)
        techie69
        • 2 Years Ago
        @fredbertshopping
        Nope, your economics is fox newsz(Aussie owned) derived. What will effect GM and Ford is buyers who my opt for a more reliable vehicle than theirs, that's where production problems arise which my affect the two automanufacturers.
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