• Apr 18, 2011
Five years ago, if you owned a vehicle with push button start, you probably owned a luxury vehicle or high-end sports car. For 2011, there are 189 vehicles with push start technology, including many vehicles that retail for less than $20,000. But while the technology has proliferated to nearly every vehicle segment, each automaker has its own keyless ignition mechanism.

Automotive News reports that the Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE) International isn't crazy about this, and it's looking to standardize keyless ignition systems. The move can be at least partially viewed as a reaction to unintended acceleration issues faced by Toyota. Some Toyota owners who reported reported the UA phenomenon were unable to turn off the vehicle because Toyota's programmers necessitate that the star/stop button must be pressed for three or more seconds to cut off power to the engine.

According to Automotive News, the SAE proposes that drivers should be able to stop the vehicle by pressing the button for .5 to two seconds, or by briefly pressing the button two or three times.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has also reportedly added that it may propose a rule this year to standardize the systems, leading at least one automaker to consider waiting to redesign their systems until uniform standards can be agreed upon. Interestingly, a poll by AN revealed that while General Motors, Ford, Volkswagen, Honda, Nissan, Chrysler and Hyundai planned to comply with the SAE standard – only Toyota says that it won't follow the guidelines until it learns if NHTSA will chime in with its own regulations, as well.

[Source: Automotive News - sub. req. via Automobile]
Image by Chris Shunk / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 35 Comments
      Robdaemon
      • 3 Years Ago
      I have now owned two cars with keyless ignition systems - a 2007 BMW and a 2008 Nissan. I won't buy another car that doesntnhave this. I love just leaving the key in my pocket.
        Luke
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Robdaemon
        Agreed. I have a Mazda 6 with the fob...this thing locks itself as I walk away, unlocks all the doors when I open mine.... Very convenient.
      SheldonRoss
      • 3 Years Ago
      Suppose I'll point at this is talking about standardizing OPERATION of keyless ignition, Not making them standard. I doubt this will stop the torrent of "They can pry my keys from my cold dead fingers" but it's worth a shot.
      scott
      • 3 Years Ago
      My Dad has a current generation Nissan Altima which features this technology. The problem I have with it is that he has had more than one occasion where the stop/start button failed on him. This kind of technology needs to work 100% of the time.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      motordude90
      • 3 Years Ago
      i have one problem with all the keyless intry systems that are out there what if you have a dead battery then how do you get in the vehicle
        Keno Graham
        • 3 Years Ago
        @motordude90
        10,11 volts should be enough to open a door, but you can always use the key hidden inside the keyfob to open it.
      Ohso Clutch
      • 3 Years Ago
      a "good" excuse to charge more? ...Why not?
      Making11s
      • 3 Years Ago
      Am I crazy for liking keys?
        gefinley
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Making11s
        No, you aren't. I quite like having a key to turn in the ignition.
      Jonathan
      • 3 Years Ago
      I really don't like these keyless start stuff. To me it just makes it seem easier to steal the car somehow. That and you have to find somewhere to put the key.... (if you dont want a lego brick in your pocket...) Don't get me wrong, I like this option AS AN OPTION but not standard, like on the Lexus and Infinitis. Is it really that hard to put a key in an ignition and turn it?
      Brummie
      • 3 Years Ago
      Whats wrong with a key, if it ain't broke then why fix it, what next square wheels?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Brummie
        [blocked]
          Brummie
          • 3 Years Ago
          Ha! I live in a tent in a desert with my wives, neither would be much use to me! But good point no more worn out trouser pockets from keys I suppose.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      wilkegm
      • 3 Years Ago
      I fail to see where it says anything about "The Fed" in the post. The SAE may be important, but they are in no way the Gov't. Standards to follow are good. Over-zealously requiring BS on cars (TPMS, Back-up cam, child seat detection, etc) is bad and cost us all a fortune.
      htay9500
      • 3 Years Ago
      Oh please don't.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @htay9500
        [blocked]
    • Load More Comments