• Apr 28, 2010
2010 Aprilia Shiver 750 – Click above for high-res image gallery

Aprilia's Shiver 750 has yet to set the world on fire due to a number of reasons that include an abnormally high seat and pegs that scrap way too early when the bike is pushed anywhere near its limits. Be that as it may, the basic platform is a sound one, and Aprilia has seen fit to give the bike a series of updates that ought to make it more competitive with Ducati's standard-bearing Monster line.

Chief amongst the functional changes include rider footpegs that are placed further back and higher up than before. Coupled with a handlebar that's lower and further forward, the 2010 Shiver should put its rider in a slightly sportier stance. Seat height has been lowered by .2 inches, which isn't a lot, but since the seat is also significantly narrower, shorter riders should be able to get their feet more solidly on terra firma.

Finally, the rear wheel's width goes down half an inch to 5.5 inches, which should make the bike a wee bit snappier when making side-to-side transitions. Other than that, the only alterations are to the bike's appearance, and fortunately, everything is looking classically Italian. Will those minor changes be enough to accelerate the Shiver's sales closer to Aprilia's expectations? We'll see.



[Source: Aprilia via Hell For Leather]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 5 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Looks pretty decent. I might hive a hard time taking this over the new Monster though.
      • 4 Years Ago
      "Aprilia's Shiver 750 has yet to set the world on fire due to a number of reasons that include an abnormally high seat and pegs that scrap(e) way too early when the bike is pushed anywhere near its limits."

      Limits that 90%+ riders will never come close the reaching.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I'm not sure what kind of riders you know, but everyone I know takes their bike to the very limit of its lean angle at some time or another.

        If you are unable to achieve max lean angle on your motorcycle (not saying it should be part of every day riding nor is it a safe practice to make it part of your normal riding style) you should get the he|| off your motorcycle, as you are obviously uncomfortable with your bike.
      • 4 Years Ago
      don't ride this bike in puerto rico