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Those crazy German engineers are at it again; this time planning for the day an engine will combine gasoline and diesel technologies. Dr. Thomas Weber, board member responsible for research, technology and development at MB has this to say about the diesotto: "Step by step, the components of diesel and petrol engines are growing closer: the combustion process, common-rail direct injection, turbocharging. In the end, we believe this development will see the complete integration of the two engines into one type which combines the best of petrol and diesel." Oh, and the name? It's a mash-up of Rudolph Diesel and Nikolaus Otto, the two German inventors of the diesel and four-stroke Otto-cycle engines.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      • 10 Years Ago
      Now that MB owns Mopar, I guess it's OK to resurrect the DeSoto name.
      • 10 Years Ago
      Hooray! I knew the beautiful Desoto would make a comeback.
      • 10 Years Ago
      Good idea, dumb name.
      • 10 Years Ago
      Quote "Diesel emissions are very dirty." What about Europe, they use a clean diesel that is clear like gasoline and has much less sulfur than the dirty crap we can buy here in the U.S. And not to forget they also use particle filters thats why diesel is at almost 50% for new cars sold in Europe.
      • 10 Years Ago
      Diesel emissions are very dirty. If we could get the engine to stop at lights or in traffic, that would do a lot to curb emissions. Mileage isnt everything about hybrids, they also aid in emission reduction.
      • 10 Years Ago
      Current diesels are as good or better on fuel consumption than current hybrids. Why add another layer of complexity? Hybrids are an ugly hack...
      • 10 Years Ago
      Diesel engines aren't dirty if you feed them clean fuel and scrub the exhaust. European diesel is low in sulfur, which contributes much of the soot. Sulfur content also interferes with several otherwise-feasible types of exhaust filters. US regs will bring low-sulfur diesel here in the next couple years, so this is a market very much in flux. Biodiesel is naturally low in sulfur -- yet another of its advantages.