• Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
  • Image Credit: CarPix
Before Jaguar introduced the F-Pace crossover, the only way an American could get their hands on a long-roof leaper was to either move to Europe and buy an XF Sportbrake or pick up the rare X-Type Sportwagon on the used market. But now that the F-Pace is on sale, there's no need for a Jag wagon (henceforth known as the Jagon), right? Wrong.

Spotted lapping the Nürburgring, the second-generation XF sedan transitions to wagon duty as naturally as the first-gen car did, promising a boost in cargo capacity without sacrificing the good looks of Jaguar's middle child. But the sloping roofline won't do the XF's versatility too many favors – as our spies rightly state, it looks like Jag's designers are favoring style over outright cargo space.

Beyond the roofline, expect the new Sportbrake to follow its predecessor's example and adhere very closely to the XF sedan. Don't expect any changes from the firewall forward, with most of the changes above the beltline and at the tail, where Jag's designers obviously need to rethink the look to accommodate the rear hatch. The overall taillight shape should stay the same, while the lower bumper will carry over with only modest adjustments.

Under hood, our spies report the car shown here is Jaguar's potent S trim, with a 380-horsepower, 3.0-liter, supercharged V6. While it's a safe bet that Jaguar will sell the Sportbrake in Europe with all the lesser XF engines – not to mention R and RS variants – it's unlikely all three mainstream engines will arrive in the US. Oh yeah, our spies claim there's a chance the long-roof XF will hit the US market.

We're calling it a very slim chance, though. Audi and BMW deported their A6/5 Series wagons years ago, leaving the segment to the Mercedes-Benz E-Class. The Volvo V90 will add some Swedish flair to the segment, but the bottom line is that importing and federalizing a new model to compete in a segment responsible for just 20,000 units per year isn't good business. Here's hoping Jaguar makes a bad business decision.

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