About a month back, we reported that Porsche was suspending delivery of its 911 GT3 due to reported incidents of the engine bursting into flames. A few days later, Porsche told owners of the new track-ready models not to drive their cars and had their local dealers pick up the cars in question. Just a couple of days ago, we reported that Porsche was working on a fix, and now we have the official details.

Following an internal investigation prompted by two such incidents, Porsche has confirmed that is has identified the problem as resulting "from a loosened screw joint on the connecting rod." The loose connecting rod, Porsche found, damaged the crankcase, which in turn resulted in oil leaking and then – in at least two cases – igniting.

Our source is unaware of Porsche being contacted by GT3 owners concerned about the impact of a replacement engine on their car's collectibility or resale value.

In order to fix the problem, Porsche is replacing the engines entirely on all 785 affected units of the GT3, fitting these new engines (as well as new models to be built once production resumes) with "optimised screw fittings." Our source at Porsche indicates that under 200 of the affected coupes actually reached customers – most are at port (where they will be fixed prior to reaching showrooms), or at dealers.

We also inquired as to whether Porsche had fielded any calls from concerned GT3 owners regarding the replacement engine's potential impact on their car's collectibility or resale value, and our source told us that they have not heard of owners raising any questions. Should such a scenario arise, we were told that, "The company will handle the customers on a case-by-case basis. All of this will be documented in the vehicle's history file that's maintained by Porsche." Presumably, if there is clear and extensive official paper trail about the engine swap, would-be used GT3 buyers and collectors would be happier knowing their car is fitted with a correct, trouble-free engine than they are about not having a numbers-matching car.

It is not immediately clear what Porsche plans to do with the hundreds of recalled GT3 engines once it extracts them.
Show full PR text
Analyses completed:
Porsche to replace engines of current 911 GT3 models

Stuttgart. Sports car manufacturer Porsche will be replacing the engines of all 911 GT3* vehicles of model year 2014. This is the corrective action derived from intensive internal analyses that were initiated in response to two engine fires. Meanwhile, it has been confirmed that engine damage resulted from a loosened screw joint on the connecting rod. The loose connecting rod damaged the crankcase, which in both cases led to leakage of oil which then ignited.

After becoming aware of the two cases, Porsche promptly took action to avoid any risk to customers by advising them to cease using the affected 785 vehicles until further notice and have them picked up by a Porsche Centre. Now, engines with optimised screw fittings will be used in all Porsche 911 GT3 vehicles of model year 2014 – including in those that have not been delivered yet. The relevant Porsche Centres are in direct communication with customers worldwide to discuss the further course of action.

Porsche points out that no other 911 models or other model series are affected by this action.

*Porsche model series 911 GT3: Fuel consumption combined 12,4 l/100 km; CO2-emission 289 g/km; efficiency class: G


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  • 48 Comments
      ken
      • 9 Months Ago
      I wish they can use the old engines as coffee tables.
        superchan7
        • 9 Months Ago
        @ken
        The old engines must be scrapped. They can't risk you "spilling your coffee due to a broken con rod bolt," and then suing them.
          Gorgenapper
          • 9 Months Ago
          @superchan7
          The worse risk is the coffee spontaneously catching on fire.
      icemilkcoffee
      • 9 Months Ago
      "The loose connecting rod, Porsche found, damaged the crankcase, which in turn resulted in oil leaking " A loose connecting rod hitting the crank case? Wouldn't this stop the engine right then and there with a big bang?
        CarNutMike
        • 9 Months Ago
        @icemilkcoffee
        That's probably what happened, followed immediately by the fire.
      WindsWilling
      • 9 Months Ago
      What an odd "fix". But hey, hats off to them rather than putting some red locktite on the threads and calling it a day, they're putting a new engine in each one.
        rmt_1
        • 9 Months Ago
        @WindsWilling
        This would not be the first time a German automaker found replacing the entire engine was a cheaper solution to a problem than fixing the existing engine. BMW, I believe, had to replace a whole series of engines because the cylinder coating that replace metal liners in their engine blocks started to fail in some cars and could cause the engine to seize. Considering the price Porsche wants for the GT3, the damage to their reputation for not taking that extra mile could easily be more costly than taking this extra measure that protects their image.
      sloturbo
      • 9 Months Ago
      The Hamster will be very pleased with this option.
      BDO guy
      • 9 Months Ago
      "...our source told us that they have not heard of owners raising any questions." Seriously!?? - head over to Rennlist and start reading the 200+ page thread.
        Gorgenapper
        • 9 Months Ago
        @BDO guy
        If you didn't know that statement was bullsh*t, please fix your BS meter.
      healthtrekker
      • 9 Months Ago
      I find it disturbing that Porsche has not yet found a way to blame the owners for this, as is their typical fashion. They must be slipping. Or nuts. Or they've got a couple screws loose...
      AcidTonic
      • 9 Months Ago
      2500 a month and now you gotta explain this when you try to sell it.... An immediate 20-40K is lost just by the "doubt" this issue now caused. If it was listed for $100 I'm only paying $80 now.
        thequebecerinfrance
        • 9 Months Ago
        @AcidTonic
        So a recall automatically lowers the resale value? Funny, I thought not replacing the engine would lower the resale value. Getting the upgraded factory engine would should help the car keep it's value since it's Porsche approved.
      over9000
      • 9 Months Ago
      Piece of unreliable German junk
        Brandon
        • 9 Months Ago
        @over9000
        What a load of BS from someone who probably cant even afford a used Porsche let alone a new one. http://editorial.autos.msn.com/article.aspx?cp-documentid=1135149 http://www.nydailynews.com/autos/cars-reliable-lexus-porsche-top-poll-article-1.1264419 http://www.autoblog.com/2011/12/12/porsche-911-is-officially-germanys-most-reliable-car/
          Lachmund
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Brandon
          just ignore him brandon...he's a terrible troll who likes to hate on anything german on this site, if it makes him feel better...
          over9000
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Brandon
          I can't afford a Porsche? Who are you, my accountant? Germany's most reliable car is still less reliable than a Japanese econobox.
          Shiftright
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Brandon
          Let's talk about 996 and Boxters seizing their engines then shall we? Look, you can be an admirer of the marque and still admit that no manufacturer is without failure.
          thequebecerinfrance
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Brandon
          Dam autocorrect, enjoy.
          thequebecerinfrance
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Brandon
          Pfffff...
          thequebecerinfrance
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Brandon
          I heard he really envoy his powerful Nissan Versa.
      Britt Benston
      • 9 Months Ago
      Isn't there a concern for the long-term investment with these not being matching-numbers cars?
        John Hughan
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Britt Benston
        So you didn't feel the need to read the actual article before commenting, huh?
      canuckcharlie
      • 9 Months Ago
      No need to sweat about the cost of engine replacement when they are making 23k profit per car (prob more on GT3)
      Shiftright
      • 9 Months Ago
      This recalls the time when Porsche had to replace virtually every Boxster engine in its first year of production and then there was the whole thing again with the 996 seizing engines left and right. Funny, if this was an Alfa or a Fiat, there would be a deluge of boorishly passé 'Fix It Again Tony' jokes, or slams about Italian quality, reliability, etc etc. Yet somehow, the vaunted Germans' image and rep always seem to escape untarnished however, whereas none of the various Alfas I've owned have never seized an engine nor have I been admonished by the factory not to drive you lest it catch fire. I admire and quite like Porsches, but mostly, I admire their marketing department and whatever they and other German makes have put in our Kool Aid to make us think theirs are the best, infallible, highest quality, best engineered cars and all others are inferior.
      Bernard
      • 9 Months Ago
      Such a shame, that's the best 911 they make.
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