2011 Chevrolet Impala
  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala
  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala

  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala
  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala

  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala
  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala

  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala
  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala

  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala
  • 2011 Chevrolet Impala

The new 2014 Chevrolet Impala is, by all accounts, a far superior vehicle to the model it replaces. In fact, it was the first American car to beat out the import competition and earn distinction from Consumer Reports as the best sedan on the market. But not everyone wants the new and improved model.

The outgoing Impala has proven a favorite among fleet buyers, and to keep those customers coming back for more, word has it that Chevy will continue producing the previous version (pictured above) until 2016.

That's two years longer than the outgoing Impala was supposed to last, but the business from rental and government fleets, among others, means that the GM plant in Oshawa, Ontario, will keep on producing the previous model as the Impala Limited. The move follows a similar path taken by previous versions of the Malibu (to say nothing of the long-lived Caprice Classic) that stayed in production for fleet use long after they'd been replaced for individual purchase.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 90 Comments
      anthony_patrick2
      • 1 Year Ago
      i have a 2012 impala LTZ i bought as a ex rental car. got a great price for it. a Passat, Camry, Accord, Avalon packaged the same way and the same amount of miles would have been $10,000 more. i just needed a car cheap and quick and was a great buy for that. with the LTZ i have the sport suspension so its not as soft and sloppy as the LS and LT. the 3.6 is the same as the CTS and Camaro. i get 30mpg highway.
      BLS
      • 1 Year Ago
      GMs fleet strategy (Caprice, Captiva, and Impala Limited) seems pretty smart. The only thing that confuses me is why you would call this one the Impala Limited instead of just the "Classic" because Impala Limited sounds like it should be a step up from the Impala not a rental special.
      R.t Voll
      • 1 Year Ago
      For the love of god please remove the impala name. Call this the lumina. Thats what it basically is anyways..
        Koushiro Izumi
        • 1 Year Ago
        @R.t Voll
        "This model is but the 2014 is not. The 2014 despite not being RWD is very nice and believe it or not its actually faster then the 90s ss models." I want to clarify what I meant in my last post. When I meant that there was only one car that deserved that nameplate....I didn't mean the 90's Impala SS. I was actually referring to what car Chevrolet sells today that's more of a true successor to the 90's Impala and more deserving of the "Impala" name than the '14 Lumina it's on now. I was actually referring to the VF Commodore based 2014 SS sedan. That's what a real Impala (as well as a true Impala SS) should be.
      SYE
      • 1 Year Ago
      I've driven everything under the sun. I'm also forced to rent cars for travel several weeks out of the year. The Impala (Limited) is not going to win a beauty pageant, but this car with leather, satellite radio, and the 3.6 L engine that delivers 302 hp is very cozy and fuel efficient. The 2012-2014 models (with the 3.6 L engine standard) is probably one of the best values on the used car market. These things are practically brand new and sell for low teens. A lot of you are showing your immaturity in this comment section. Nobody gives a %$#@ what you drive. And if you care that much, you're in for a depressing adult life.
        FuelToTheFire
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SYE
        Couldn't have said it better myself. I would take a 2012 Impala over a 2013 Camry any day of the week.
          Roger
          • 1 Year Ago
          @FuelToTheFire
          Amen. People who call the Impala 'garbage' haven't really ever driven true garbage.
          jtav2002
          • 1 Year Ago
          @FuelToTheFire
          I wouldn't even think twice about taking a 2013 Camry over 2012 Camry. Come on now. And it's not hard to get one for so cheap when they have such awful resale. Sure great for someone who wants one used, not so good for those who own them. The 2007 SS I had stickered at 32k. After TWO years it was worth $15k.
      ndcart
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wonder if this will help the residual value of the new model. Keeping the new model away from fleet sales could only be a good thing right?
        Julius
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ndcart
        That was the thinking behind keeping the Captiva (think Vue clone) fleet-only while the current Equinox gets updated.
        Dean
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ndcart
        I'm not entirely sure of this, as I have seen the new Impala in rental service. I actually look forward to driving the new one as a rental sometime.
      reattadudes
      • 1 Year Ago
      as always, many comments from the 16-18 year old Autoblog peanut gallery. some thoughts: -not everyone is too concerned with gymkhanas and drifting competitions. -90% of rental car users are only concerned with a roomy and reliable car that has good fuel economy. the Impala has all in spades. -these will do very well in the one-year-old vehicle used car market, just like they are now. -very efficient use of a platform that has been fully amortized for years. probably the highest profit car GM makes...and that's "bad", right? its also comical that most of the posters are totally unaware of how much more expensive the new Impala is. a 2014 loaded version approaches $40,000; the older, "undesirable" model topped out at about $32,000. GM did exactly the same thing in 2011, when they resurrected the Saturn Vue, and called it the (fleet-only) Chevrolet Captiva. another fully amortized, huge profit vehicle for GM, and very popular on the late model used car market.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @reattadudes
        The new version tops out more because it's THAT much better of a car. The same way the Taurus moved up market. You didn't have much to show for $32k in the old Impala.
      Arizonarelax
      • 1 Year Ago
      The real question, will GM count these rental Impalas in their sales numbers with the new model that isn't selling well?
        R.t Voll
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Arizonarelax
        The new model isn't selling well? I have been seeing them everywhere here in NY
          NightFlight
          • 1 Year Ago
          @R.t Voll
          All the new Impalas I have seen have a barcode in the window, meaning they are rentals. I'd love to see the fleet ratio for the new model, something tells me it is still pretty high.
      mlm4cam
      • 11 Months Ago
      We have several 2012 Impala LT's in our motor pool. I have driven hundreds of miles in these vehicles, which our shop maintains by the book. The 2012 engine was a huge step up from the earlier mill, and the transmission works great....I love the low RPM's in 6th gear at freeway speeds. I have executed many safe passing maneuvers on narrow two-lane country highways with it, with no problems at 90 to 95 mph---I don't need to exceed that speed on a pass, and I don't use cars as a toy or attention-getter. Both the 2012 and 2013 Impalas are thoroughly useful vehicles for engineers like me who don't want to drive something that looks like a kiddie car or a pimp-mobile. Many of the comments here appear to be written by kids.....However, I have driven 600,000 miles on three continents, have rebuilt cars, and have owned too many of them over the decades...... BTW, Our shop mechanics have told me that these have few bugs and no negative feedback from users. They are a tool that does the job...... 'nuff said.
      Quest
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wonder if they're going to keep up with the fantasy and still not break out the numbers for what are two very distinct cars selling under one nameplate? As for the Imp Ltd, well, until it got the 3.6L it was average to below in reliability with everything from rear spindle bearings (destroys rear tires in about 5k miles) to head and manifold gaskets on the "High Value" pushrod powertrains. Then again, fleet gets them well below $20k anyway so...
        Jerry
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Quest
        If you got the 3800 V6 and the 4T65 4-speed, the powertrain was bulletproof for 200,000+ miles. Cannot speak to that rear end issue. Have a 2008 Pontiac Grand Prix with 130,000 miles now. No tire wear or back end issues.
      belfagor
      • 1 Year Ago
      As everybody who's driven this older Impala knows, it is an abysmally horrendous car, one that would have finished last in a 10-car comparison in the mid-nineties, let alone in 2013 (god forbid, 2016!). The only reason to keep manufacturing it is that GM can sell it at a ridiculously low price to Hertz and Avis of this world, and still crank out a profit, or at least break even and keep the plant running. In other words, GM found the golden goose: a crappy car (btw, so much for the new GM mantra "no more crappy cars!") for which there is a volume buyer who doesn't care about the crappiness, as long as it's got 4 wheels and can be rented out. But it's not real gold, because the unfortunate renter will end up swearing off GM for life based on his/her miserable Impala experience. I am such an example, for one.
        Roger
        • 1 Year Ago
        @belfagor
        If it's a crappy car there must be a lot of morons buying it, because everywhere I go I see these older ones all over the road. There's no denying the new one's very nice. Not everyone wants a car with a ton of bells and whistles and despite the flaws of the outgoing Impala model, it sold in decent, if not great, numbers.
          GoSpeedRacerGo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Roger
          Sales volume is rarely an accurate measure of product quality or customer intelligence.
          NightFlight
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Roger
          Roger, the old one has a 70%+ fleet ratio. Actual retail customers AREN'T really buying them.
        Alfonso T. Alvarez
        • 1 Year Ago
        @belfagor
        Wrong - and it would guess that: 1. You have never driven one. 2. If you actually have, it had 350K miles on it. 3. You haven't driven more than three different cars in your life - if, and that's a big if, you are actually a licensed driver.
        Bernard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @belfagor
        It's not miserable. Boring sure. It's a toaster on wheels, but it still makes toast which is good enough for a rental.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @belfagor
        I had a 2007 SS for 2 years. Wasn't an awful car and I wouldn't sear off GM forever because of it.
      roller146
      • 1 Year Ago
      This car is beyond bland and is well known for being an absolutely terrible purchase. I instantly judge drivers of Impalas as less intelligent, less independent, and less resourceful for not spending three minutes to find a competitive vehicle in a given price range. Today, I think less of GM for continuing to build this abomination. I'm impressed with the new Impala as a car, but GM should have given it a new name to disassociate it with the bad joke known as the old Impala
      aruca2526
      • 1 Year Ago
      The only problem is that GM is already selling the new 2014 Impala to fleets. I read in Motortrend by as much as 30% of total sales. The number I see at Enterprise lots makes me believe this.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @aruca2526
        [blocked]
    • Load More Comments