"It really is a sin to waste a good meat," says Montana State Sen. Larry Jent, D-Bozeman. And so he's trying to do something about such sinfully wasteful practices by introducing legislation in Montana that would make it legal to recover roadkill – be it elk, deer, antelope or moose – for food. According to reports, it's likely that the bill will be passed.

Smell funny to you? You may be interested to know that Montana is hardly the first state to allow certain individuals the right to scrape up good roadkill to be used for the harvesting of pelts and/or meat, and there are quite a few that don't have any particular laws that either allow or forbid the practice. For instance, states like Mississippi, Oklahoma, North and South Dakota, and many others have no laws one way or the other, while states like New York, Idaho and Wyoming allow collecting roadkill as long as it's reported to the state. A few states prohibit the practice under any circumstance including, surprisingly, Texas.

Want to know if your state is among the many that permits road kill collecting? Click here for an interactive map of roadkill collection laws for each state. And now, if you'll forgive us, we're going to step away for a moment for a quick snack.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      Space
      • 1 Year Ago
      Honestly I really don't see why it would be a problem. I mean, I probably wouldn't do it personally, but if someone hits a deer and then decides they want to eat it why not. If someone wants to eat a dead raccoon off the side of the road... go ahead. Silly human laws.
      Gordon Chen
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why is it illegal in the first place?
        kuntknife
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Gordon Chen
        I've heard it has to do with leaving food for the other animals in the area. I've heard of even funnier laws where if you kill and take an animal when hunting, you have to leave another dead animal in its place (ie, swap a recently killed animal for another one).
      imoore
      • 1 Year Ago
      Alabama\'s listed as N/A. Doesn\'t matter. If it\'s freshly killed, it\'s fair game. Just a few years ago, I hit a deer about a 1/4-mile away from a convenience store. Some of the folks at the store asked my why I stopped in the road. When I told them I hit the deer and it was still on the roadside, they jumped into their car and grabbed the deer before the state trooper arrived to write the accident report.
      Lab Ninja
      • 1 Year Ago
      In Utah, its ok. LOL
      John Hansen
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow, a government is passing a common sense law. However small, it's nice to see it happen from time to time.
      Circ
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good, now the 10% of idiots that leave bait on the road, hide in darkness with their headlights off, and then run over the animals when they come out to get the bait can actually have the decency to wait until deer season.
      Klep
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hawaii is listed as the 51st state. What am I missing here? No DC or Puerto Rico included in the map.
      BipDBo
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't care what the law is. If a deer jumps out in front of me and suddenly I'm faced with a big bill for body repairs, I'm eatin that deer.
        BipDBo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BipDBo
        Good news for me. In my home state of Florida, it's perfectly legal to take home a roadkill deer. More so, the chance is pretty low, so my car is pretty safe. If I want deer, I'll have to shoot it. I guess in Florida the law enforcement has much more bizarr behaviour to worry about. I'd like to know if that policy extends to other animals. Here you're probably more likely to hit a gator, which when prepared right is delicious. Seminoles, not so much.
      BC
      • 1 Year Ago
      In PA you're supposed to call the Game Commission for a free permit within 24 hr of picking up a road-killed deer, whether you hit it or just picked it up--they keep track of the number of deer in the state. You're actually suppose to call anyway so the carcass can be picked up for sanitary disposal. If the deer can be determined to be recently dead, there are volunteer butchers who will dress the carcass for food banks. Commercial fur animals can be picked up if you have a trapping license. Birds and small game are not supposed to be picked up--it's a health issue.
      Motorolabizz
      • 1 Year Ago
      I didn't realize why this needed to be a law in the first place until I watched Alaskan State Troopers...people illegally killing animals for sport out of season.
      m3laszlo
      • 1 Year Ago
      bouttime
      johnb
      • 1 Year Ago
      I never thought it was illegal to take what you hit in the road. news to me.
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